Marti Mikkelson

News Reporter

Marti, a Waukesha native, joined the WUWM news team in February of 1999. Previously, she was an anchor and reporter at WTMJ in Milwaukee, WIBA in Madison, and WLIP in Kenosha.

Marti’s work has been recognized by RTNDA, the Wisconsin Broadcasters Association, the Northwest Broadcast News Association, Associated Press, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, and the Milwaukee Press Club.

Marti earned a bachelor’s degree in Mass Communications from the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse. Marti currently lives on her favorite side of town – Milwaukee’s east side.

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Marti Mikkelson

As the Trump administration considers tightening the rules over which immigrants and refugees can be in the country, one local church is preparing itself to serve as a sanctuary, if needed. Members of the Casa de Restauracion church in New Berlin say they can transform the building on a moment’s notice.

Marti Mikkelson

The lines have been non-stop at the Milwaukee City Clerk’s office – of people applying for the new Municipal ID card. They cannot use it for voting, but can use it for such things as opening a bank account or accessing prescriptions, if they don’t have any other kind of government ID.

Marti Mikkelson

Not long after violence broke out in Milwaukee’s Sherman Park neighborhood in August, Gov. Walker dispatched mobile job banks to the central city. He was responding to the calls for state help, to address the lack of job opportunities in the area. Now, a half-year later, phase two has begun.  On Tuesday, the state announced it was providing several hundred thousand dollars to help train residents for jobs.

Marti Mikkelson

It has been six months since a Milwaukee police officer shot and killed an armed suspect in the Sherman Park neighborhood, sparking two nights of unrest. Protesters destroyed or damaged several businesses in the area of Sherman and Burleigh, particularly the gas station located at the foot of the park. WUWM visited the epicenter of the unrest to ask neighbors how things are going, a half-year later.

Have you noticed that you’re not seeing many ads for the upcoming Wisconsin Supreme Court election? That’s because only one person is running – the incumbent. 

Conservative-leaning Justice Annette Ziegler has no challenger this spring – it means she’s virtually assured of another ten year term on the court.

Ann Althouse, flickr

There’s disagreement among state Republicans over some items that Gov. Walker will likely propose in his budget Wednesday. Gov. Walker has indicated that he will call for more funding for K-12 schools, particularly in rural areas. 

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos is pleased. He says many public schools have seen declining enrollment and it affects the amount of money the state sends them.

Micaela Martin

Milwaukee Democrats have unveiled their wish list for the next state budget as Gov. Walker prepares to deliver his Wednesday. The governor is expected to propose a fix for the transportation deficit and allocate more money for schools. Democrats say they hope to work with Republicans on some issues.

Yet, Dems are not happy with much of what Walker has already revealed about his proposed budget. Number one on Milwaukee Democrats’ list of priorities for the next state budget: jobs.

Marti Mikkelson

The Milwaukee County Board held a contentious debate Thursday over refugees and undocumented immigrants. When it ended, the board voted 12-6 to affirm its commitment to protecting immigrants who live here. 

The issue arose in response to President Trump’s order to temporarily bar people from seven mostly Muslim countries and his talk of deporting at least some undocumented immigrants.

Michelle Maternowski

This week’s Bubbler Talk question comes from Jeanne Pehoski, who wanted to know: When is the Grand Avenue going to be a go-to destination again and get some viable anchor stores and better offerings in the food court?

I met Jeanne at the mall in the heart of downtown Milwaukee, where she shops a couple times a month. She says she visits TJ Maxx and Walgreens - a couple of the stores that have survived for years.

Marti Mikkelson

There have been a lot of different reactions to President Trump’s first two weeks in office. He’s been issuing executive orders almost daily. 

Among them, a repeal of President Obama’s signature health care plan and a temporary ban on immigrants and refugees from seven Muslim countries.

William Welch is eating breakfast at the El Greco diner on Milwaukee’s north side. The retired bus driver calls the first ten days of Trump’s tenure, terrible and believes the president has abused his executive power.

Marti Mikkelson

Tuesday is the deadline for people to enroll in former President Obama’s signature health care plan, the Affordable Care Act. UW-Milwaukee has been urging students to enroll while they still can – if they are uninsured. We spoke with several who attended a recent sign-up session on campus.

Jacqueline Howell is a junior at UWM, majoring in global studies. She says she turned 26 this month and that meant she could no longer remain on her parents’ health insurance. The Affordable Care Act sets the limit at 26. So now, Howell has to sign up for her own plan.

Marti Mikkelson

Milwaukee Public Schools announced a huge partnership Wednesday, in hopes of dramatically increasing student retention and graduation rates. It involves UW-Milwaukee and the Milwaukee Area Technical College.

It was a packed house at MATC in downtown Milwaukee as leaders from the three institutions unveiled their initiative. MPS Superintendent Darienne Driver said it has been in the works for 18 months.

Ron Sachs - Pool/Getty Images

Business and labor leaders across Wisconsin have different feelings about a move President Trump made. This week, he ordered the U.S. to withdraw from the Trans Pacific Partnership, or TPP. The Obama administration had been negotiating the huge trade agreement, involving the United States and Pacific Rim nations.

Michael Rosen calls the TPP flawed from Wisconsin’s vantage point. He teaches economics at Milwaukee Area Technical College and leads the faculty union there.

Marti Mikkelson

People were cheering and clinking champagne glasses Friday morning in Waukesha County, as Donald Trump was sworn-in as the nation’s 45th president. We caught up with Republicans in Delafield as they watched the inauguration ceremony unfold.

About 25 Trump supporters gathered for a watch party at the Delafield Brewhaus. They let out a holler when the oath of office ended. After the inaugural address, the partygoers helped themselves to a buffet.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Some Republicans from Wisconsin are excited that they will get to witness Donald Trump being sworn-in today as the nation’s 45th president. We caught up with several local GOP activists who have arrived in Washington.

It’s not the first presidential Inauguration for Mary Buestrin of Mequon. In fact, she’s travelled to Washington for three others.

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