Marti Mikkelson

News Reporter

Marti, a Waukesha native, joined the WUWM news team in February of 1999. Previously, she was an anchor and reporter at WTMJ in Milwaukee, WIBA in Madison, and WLIP in Kenosha.

Marti’s work has been recognized by RTNDA, the Wisconsin Broadcasters Association, the Northwest Broadcast News Association, Associated Press, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, and the Milwaukee Press Club.

Marti earned a bachelor’s degree in Mass Communications from the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse. Marti currently lives on her favorite side of town – Milwaukee’s east side.

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Southeastern Wisconsin has long been a leader in the world of manufacturing. That reputation might conjure images of machinery and tools. But nine percent of the items manufactured here are food products.

There are more than 250 food and beverage factories in southeastern Wisconsin, and the economic development group, the M7, estimates that those companies employ more than 14,000 workers and generate nearly $600 million in annual salaries. In this installment of “Project Milwaukee: What’s on our Plate?” WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson takes us to several operations that have been growing.

We now continue out Project Milwaukee series, exploring the barriers that confront thousands of Milwaukee Public School students. Today, WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson takes us to one of the lowest performing schools in the state: Bay View High School on the city’s south side. She spoke with teachers and other adult leaders there about educating a relatively large number of students who are struggling academically or personally.

Our series Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water continues this morning. We’re reporting on Milwaukee’s efforts to become a global hub for water research and technology. In the past few years, companies already in the water business here have been expanding. But as WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson reports, leaders are now working to kick the effort into high gear. The ultimate prize would be jobs and economic development, along with a good dose of prestige.

Today, we conclude our series about race relations. Projects Milwaukee culminated in a forum on the topic Wednesday evening at the Mitchell Park Domes. As part of the discussion, audience members brainstormed at their tables about barriers to racial harmony and who's responsible for change. Here are some conclusions reached, conveyed by Yvette Mitchell, Paul Schneider, Steven Hunter, Gina Green Harris, Kori Schneider, Omar Barbarana and Mary DeNoble.

Our series about race relations concludes today on WUWM. Project Milwaukee: Black and White culminated in a panel discussion earlier this week at the Mitchell Park Domes. Here's a snapshot of the comments our panel members offered. Our panelists were: Mark Levine of UW-Milwaukee, Tim Sheehy, head of the Metropolitan Milwaukee Association of Commerce, Enrique Figueroa, Director of the Roberto Hernandez Center at UWM, Howard Fuller of Marquette University and Paula Penebaker, President and CEO of the YWCA of Greater Milwaukee.

Our Project Milwaukee series about race relations continues now on WUWM. Today, we talk about a newer wave of immigrants to the city: Latinos. They now comprise 12 percent of the population of Milwaukee County, or more than 114,000 residents. WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson reports on the Latino movement here and how it compares with the black and white experiences.

Milwaukee has long held a reputation of being segregated: with blacks living primarily on the north side and whites on the south.

In today’s installment of Project Milwaukee: Black and White, WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson visited establishments on both sides of town, to ask blacks and whites about their interactions with each other.

For the past few years, Milwaukee has grappled with a triple digit homicide rate, and among the victims have been children. Some have been involved in gangs and criminal activity; others were innocent bystanders caught in the crossfire. WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson talked to one young gunshot survivor, as part of our series, Project Milwaukee: Youth Violence.

Last year, Milwaukee’s public schools became a testing ground for a national program designed to reduce school violence. Under the Violence Free Zone Initiative, specially-trained youth mentors from the neighborhood walk the halls of local high schools, breaking up fights and diffusing potentially violent situations. It appears the strategy has been working in the six Milwaukee high schools that have implemented the program.

Yesterday, we visited part of a Milwaukee aldermanic district that's thriving. Today, we tour another section that's struggling to develop - Riverwest. WUWM's Marti Mikkelson reports on Milwaukee's Riverwest neighborhood. She spoke with Alderman Mike D'Amato and members of the community.

This month, WUWM is exploring the subject of economic development in metro Milwaukee. As part of the Project Milwaukee series, Marti Mikkelson is profiling one aldermanic district that has seen success in one section, and challenges in another.

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