Marti Mikkelson

News Reporter

Marti, a Waukesha native, joined the WUWM news team in February of 1999. Previously, she was an anchor and reporter at WTMJ in Milwaukee, WIBA in Madison, and WLIP in Kenosha.

Marti’s work has been recognized by RTNDA, the Wisconsin Broadcasters Association, the Northwest Broadcast News Association, Associated Press, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, and the Milwaukee Press Club.

Marti earned a bachelor’s degree in Mass Communications from the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse. Marti currently lives on her favorite side of town – Milwaukee’s east side.

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This week, Wisconsin state agencies will submit their spending requests for the next two years. Many eyes may focus on the state’s transportation budget. It faces a $1 billion deficit, and at a time when Wisconsin’s roads are rated as among the worst in the nation. There’s no shortage of opinions as to where the state could get more money.

Michelle Maternowski

Milwaukee County Circuit Judge David Hansher on Wednesday extended his order that Sherman Park remain open during its regular hours. However, another hearing has been set to consider the bigger issue - what's the legal protocol for deciding when an emergency exists and expires. For now, anyway, the orange fencing is gone.

Original Story from Wednesday Morning:

Marti Mikkelson

    

What is America’s place in the world? It’s the question NPR and its member stations are asking Americans this week, as voters get close to picking the next U.S. president. Today, we speak with people who patronize a huge local company: Harley-Davidson.

Some motorcycle owners seem comfortable with where the company stands globally, but say it will take effort to remain in a strong position.

Artur Marciniec, fotolia

Wisconsin election commissioners were busy Tuesday. They voted to mail postcards to more than 1 million unregistered voters, urging them to join the system and also agreed to place seven presidential candidates on the ballot in November.

Michelle Maternowski

Monday marked the deadline for the Milwaukee Common Council to place a referendum on the November ballot. It would have asked voters if they wanted to pay more property taxes in order to hire 150 additional police officers. The deadline for action came and went.

The City of Milwaukee could face a huge shortage of police officers. Estimates are that well over 300 could retire by the end of next year.

Marti Mikkelson

About two dozen churches in Milwaukee will hold events Saturday to bring neighbors together and assess their needs. 

It’s called “All Things In Common.” North side Common Council members launched it in June.

Wisconsin’s two candidates for U.S. Senate have been crisscrossing the state this summer, talking about issues that matter to voters. In Milwaukee lately, people have been concerned about a fatal police shooting and violence in the Sherman Park neighborhood. Republican Sen. Ron Johnson and Democratic challenger Russ Feingold have weighed in on Milwaukee’s struggles. The two have differing solutions.

While speaking to the Kiwanis Club in Milwaukee, incumbent Sen. Ron Johnson says the violence that broke out near Sherman Park is understandable.

Marti Mikkelson

Elected officials and community activists gathered in Milwaukee on Tuesday to criticize Gov. Walker’s job creation agency. They insist it has not done enough to fuel economic development in the Sherman Park neighborhood. 

Violence broke out there this month, after an officer fatally shot a man who police say was armed and fleeing a traffic stop. But, activists did not limit their criticism to just the state.

Darren Hauck/Getty Images

The police shooting and violence Milwaukee has experienced since the weekend topped Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's visit to the region Tuesday.

At a campaign rally in West Bend, Trump told the crowd that Democratic policies and attitudes have brought many central city neighborhoods, including in Milwaukee, to their knees.

Marti Mikkelson

In the midst of unrest in Milwaukee, several dozen young recruits entered the police academy on Monday. They’ll undergo training for six months; when they graduate, they’ll begin walking the beat as Milwaukee police officers. City leaders acknowledged during the swearing-in ceremony that the cadets would be entering the police force at a difficult time.

The cadets entered the room to applause from friends and family members. They took the oath of office at the Milwaukee Safety Academy on the north side.

Marti Mikkelson

People who live near Sherman Park on Milwaukee’s north side spent Sunday cleaning up, after violence erupted Saturday night. Demonstrators damaged property and started fires, after a police officer shot and killed a man. Police say 23-year-old Sylville Smith was holding a gun when fleeing a traffic stop.

Some neighbors brought brooms and garbage bags while others gaped at the building that used to house the BP station. It was incinerated with glass everywhere and the smell of smoke permeating the air.

A federal judge in Milwaukee on Friday overturned the conviction of Brendan Dassey, the nephew of Steven Avery, in a case profiled in the popular Netflix documentary "Making a Murderer."  Judge William Duffin ordered that Dassey be freed within 90 days unless the case is appealed.  

Dassey was 16 when he confessed to helping Avery rape and kill Theresa Halbach in 2005, when Halbach went to the Avery family salvage yard in Mishicot to photograph some vehicles.  But, attorneys argued the confession was coerced.

S Bence

Many Milwaukee County residents who attended a hearing Wednesday night at the Washington Park Senior Center don't like the thought of having to pay to park along the lakefront or a wheel tax, in order to help plug a $56 million budget shortfall.

Democratic state Sen. Lena Taylor easily turned back a challenge from another lawmaker, state Rep. Mandela Barnes. Taylor has held the north side Milwaukee seat for 12 years and garnered 61 percent of the vote in Tuesday’s primary.

The results came in quickly – at the Big Easy restaurant north of downtown. Then the crowd cheered as state Sen. Lena Taylor took the podium to claim victory.

“The people said honesty matters. The people said someone who is visible and serves the people, that matters,” Taylor says.

House Speaker Paul Ryan of Janesville has been spending the summer fending off a challenge from a political newcomer in Tuesday’s primary election. Ryan has held Wisconsin’s 1st district congressional seat since 1999 and has never had a problem getting re-elected. But this year, outside money is pouring in for Ryan’s opponent Paul Nehlen, a business executive from Delavan. While Nehlen is viewed as a long shot, Ryan isn’t taking anything for granted.

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