Marti Mikkelson

News Reporter

Marti, a Waukesha native, joined the WUWM news team in February of 1999. Previously, she was an anchor and reporter at WTMJ in Milwaukee, WIBA in Madison, and WLIP in Kenosha.

Marti’s work has been recognized by RTNDA, the Wisconsin Broadcasters Association, the Northwest Broadcast News Association, Associated Press, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, and the Milwaukee Press Club.

Marti earned a bachelor’s degree in Mass Communications from the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse. Marti currently lives on her favorite side of town – Milwaukee’s east side.

» Contact WUWM News

Micaela Martin

Repeated threats have been made this year against the Jewish Community Center in Whitefish Bay. The latest scare happened Sunday, and the JCC isn’t alone. Other Jewish organizations across the country have been targeted, so have mosques. What impact do these threats have on the people directly affected? WUWM stopped by the JCC to ask.

Micaela Martin

Gov. Walker says his administration will aid the Jewish Community Center in Whitefish Bay to make sure that it remains a safe place. The center has been the target of three bomb threats since the start of the year, including one this week. Similar threats have been made against other Jewish organizations nationwide.

Marti Mikkelson

There are more fears now, among immigrants who are in the U. S. illegally that they could be arrested and deported.  The Mexican consulate in Milwaukee says it's served more than 10,000 people since opening last summer.  

And, it's found that many clients don't have basic documentation such as passports.  The consulate held workshops over the weekend, they stressed the urgency of obtaining key papers.

Reggie Jackson -- America's Black Holocaust Museum

Milwaukee is one of the most segregated metro areas in America, according to the latest census figures. 90 percent of African-American households in the region live in Milwaukee. The numbers also point to huge economic disparities smothering African-Americans who live in the central city.

Milwaukee County supervisors are not holding regular office hours the way they did in the past. A new state law took effect nearly a year ago; it cut supervisors’ salaries in half, eliminated their health care benefits and reduced their terms from four years to two. WUWM spoke with some board members about how they’re adjusting to part-time status.

Marti Mikkelson

Members of Milwaukee’s immigrant communities gathered at City Hall on Wednesday to denounce the Trump administration’s updated deportation strategy. He has ordered federal authorities to enforce immigration laws more aggressively, including deporting people arrested for minor offenses.

One person standing with unauthorized immigrants is Elana Kahn of the Milwaukee Jewish Federation. She says her relatives could have easily been subjected to an immigration crackdown nearly 100 years ago.

Marti Mikkelson

As the Trump administration considers tightening the rules over which immigrants and refugees can be in the country, one local church is preparing itself to serve as a sanctuary, if needed. Members of the Casa de Restauracion church in New Berlin say they can transform the building on a moment’s notice.

Marti Mikkelson

The lines have been non-stop at the Milwaukee City Clerk’s office – of people applying for the new Municipal ID card. They cannot use it for voting, but can use it for such things as opening a bank account or accessing prescriptions, if they don’t have any other kind of government ID.

Marti Mikkelson

Not long after violence broke out in Milwaukee’s Sherman Park neighborhood in August, Gov. Walker dispatched mobile job banks to the central city. He was responding to the calls for state help, to address the lack of job opportunities in the area. Now, a half-year later, phase two has begun.  On Tuesday, the state announced it was providing several hundred thousand dollars to help train residents for jobs.

Marti Mikkelson

It has been six months since a Milwaukee police officer shot and killed an armed suspect in the Sherman Park neighborhood, sparking two nights of unrest. Protesters destroyed or damaged several businesses in the area of Sherman and Burleigh, particularly the gas station located at the foot of the park. WUWM visited the epicenter of the unrest to ask neighbors how things are going, a half-year later.

Have you noticed that you’re not seeing many ads for the upcoming Wisconsin Supreme Court election? That’s because only one person is running – the incumbent. 

Conservative-leaning Justice Annette Ziegler has no challenger this spring – it means she’s virtually assured of another ten year term on the court.

Ann Althouse, flickr

There’s disagreement among state Republicans over some items that Gov. Walker will likely propose in his budget Wednesday. Gov. Walker has indicated that he will call for more funding for K-12 schools, particularly in rural areas. 

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos is pleased. He says many public schools have seen declining enrollment and it affects the amount of money the state sends them.

Micaela Martin

Milwaukee Democrats have unveiled their wish list for the next state budget as Gov. Walker prepares to deliver his Wednesday. The governor is expected to propose a fix for the transportation deficit and allocate more money for schools. Democrats say they hope to work with Republicans on some issues.

Yet, Dems are not happy with much of what Walker has already revealed about his proposed budget. Number one on Milwaukee Democrats’ list of priorities for the next state budget: jobs.

Marti Mikkelson

The Milwaukee County Board held a contentious debate Thursday over refugees and undocumented immigrants. When it ended, the board voted 12-6 to affirm its commitment to protecting immigrants who live here. 

The issue arose in response to President Trump’s order to temporarily bar people from seven mostly Muslim countries and his talk of deporting at least some undocumented immigrants.

Michelle Maternowski

This week’s Bubbler Talk question comes from Jeanne Pehoski, who wanted to know: When is the Grand Avenue going to be a go-to destination again and get some viable anchor stores and better offerings in the food court?

I met Jeanne at the mall in the heart of downtown Milwaukee, where she shops a couple times a month. She says she visits TJ Maxx and Walgreens - a couple of the stores that have survived for years.

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