Marti Mikkelson

News Reporter

Marti, a Waukesha native, joined the WUWM news team in February of 1999. Previously, she was an anchor and reporter at WTMJ in Milwaukee, WIBA in Madison, and WLIP in Kenosha.

Marti’s work has been recognized by RTNDA, the Wisconsin Broadcasters Association, the Northwest Broadcast News Association, Associated Press, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, and the Milwaukee Press Club.

Marti earned a bachelor’s degree in Mass Communications from the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse. Marti currently lives on her favorite side of town – Milwaukee’s east side.

» Contact WUWM News

The national spotlight will shine on Milwaukee this week, as the city hosts the fourth debate among the Republican presidential hopefuls Tuesday night.

The site will be the Milwaukee Theatre downtown. The hosts will be Fox Business and the Wall Street Journal.

While Gov. Walker was testing the waters when the GOP selected Milwaukee, the choice may still indicate that the state could play a pivotal role in the 2016 presidential race.

alumroot

    

The Milwaukee County District Attorney’s office will make room for two new prosecutors from the state Justice Department. The new officers will focus solely on prosecuting gun crimes in Milwaukee.

The legislature’s Joint Finance committee voted unanimously Wednesday to allow the Justice Department to spend more than $350,000 on the new hires.

Jenni Konrad, flickr

Milwaukee County supervisors anticipate a packed house at the Mitchell Park Domes Monday night as they hold their annual public hearing on the budget. Supervisors are considering a $1.3 billion spending plan for 2016.

Board member Pat Jursik says many topics stir passion among county residents and bring them to the full board's public hearing each year. Topics including parks and transit.

Ann-Elise Henzl

A new study has turned up challenges for Milwaukee County as it tries to better serve residents with mental health needs.

A report from the Public Policy Forum shows low income residents, in particular, face several barriers to accessing care. The county has spent the past few years redesigning its behavioral health care system after a study exposed large scale problems providing for the neediest residents at the Mental Health Complex.

TheMilwaukeeStreetcar.jpg

Mayor Tom Barrett announced Monday that the U.S. Department of Transportation has awarded the city a $14.2 million grant to enable construction of the Milwaukee Streetcar's Lakefront Line.  

The Common Council approved the extension in February, along with phase 1 of the streetcar project.

The Lakefront Line will connect Cathedral Square to the lakefront, and will include a stop along the planned Couture development.  Groundbreaking on phase 1 of the project is scheduled for spring of 2016.

Marti Mikkelson

Dozens of homeless people in Milwaukee flocked to Marquette University on Thursday. The campus hosted a fair for people needing basic services - from haircuts to vision screenings.

Demetrius Harper hasn’t had a place to call home in four years. The 45-year-old admits his homelessness has been the result of poor choices.

“Bad decision here, bad decision there, I decided to live with a lot of people and not saving any money. It’s hard to save money when you have a lot of habits, alcohol and drug, smoking, everything pretty much,” Harper says.

Althouse

It could be a long, contentious week in the Wisconsin legislature. Lawmakers are expected to take up bills that could affect them as elected politicians.

Jimmy Emerson, flickr

It could be a lively spring election season in the city of Milwaukee. All 15 Common Council seats are up for another term in April and so is Mayor Tom Barrett's. 

There are rumblings of voter dissatisfaction on a myriad of issues. It appears enough challenges are being mounted to potentially turn over the entire council.

Tory Lowe is walking through a north side neighborhood he hopes to represent next year. He plans to challenge Ald. Milele Coggs in April’s election. Lowe says the district is struggling with many issues, including a soaring homicide rate.

Haydn Blackey, flickr

The Republican candidates for president will head to Milwaukee in less than a month. The city will be the site of one of their debates.

This week, the Republican National Committee unveiled the details; the event will take place Nov. 10 at the Milwaukee Theatre downtown. The hosts will be Fox Business and the Wall Street Journal. The plans are causing locals to prepare.

    

It was a packed house at the State Capitol on Tuesday, as lawmakers heard testimony on a bill that would dissolve the nonpartisan board that oversees elections in Wisconsin.

Under the Republican plan, the Government Accountability Board would be replaced with a pair of commissions headed by partisan appointees.

Emotions ran high as the hearing stretched into the late afternoon.

A prominent Democratic lawmaker wants to shake up the Milwaukee County Executive’s office.

State Sen. Chris Larson of Milwaukee announced Monday that he will challenge incumbent Chris Abele in April.

The election promises to be competitive.

Larson announced his bid outside his childhood home in Greenfield. Flanked by his parents, wife and two small children, Larson said he’s been mulling his decision for months.

Justin W Kern

The GOP continues to exercise total control over Wisconsin government. And, Republican leaders are using their majority to advance party priorities.

Just late last week, Gov. Walker appointed conservative Appeals Judge Rebecca Bradley to the state Supreme Court. She’ll finish the term of the late Justice Patrick Crooks, who was viewed as the court’s lone swing vote.

Marti Mikkelson

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett wants to equip police officers with body cameras by the end of next year. 

Police say the devices provide the most accurate account of interactions between officers and suspects.

It's expected to cost nearly $1 million to purchase 1,200 cameras.

Nearly 100 people turned out at the Hillside Family Resource Tuesday night for a public hearing. Speakers voiced a myriad of concerns.

Marti Mikkelson

Last year, the number of people who lost their lives to domestic violence in Wisconsin fell -  from 55 to 43. Yet those involved in fighting the problem vow to remain vigilant.

People gathered at Milwaukee City Hall Monday to show solidarity with people still suffering. Each marcher wore an orange t-shirt reading “say no to violence against women.”

They staged a walk for peace downtown and then gathered inside Milwaukee City Hall to remember last year’s victims of domestic violence.  While men’s names are on the list, much of Monday’s gathering focused on women.

Scott Olson/Getty Images

Gov. Walker returned to work this week at the State Capitol following his exit from the presidential race.

Walker faces the lowest approval ratings of his career as he settles back in to this duties. The latest Marquette Law School poll indicates that only 39 percent of state voters approve of the job he’s doing as governor.

One of the biggest issues people had with Gov. Walker’s presidential run: he just wasn’t around very much, according to JR Ross. He’s editor of wispolitics.com.

Pages