Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 20 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

Ways to Connect

The Johnson Controls name is one of the most iconic brands in Milwaukee today. Their products, high-tech batteries and temperature regulators like thermostats, are leaders in their industries. But if things had gone differently, the company could have been just as well-known in a different industry.

Today employees at Johnson Controls headquarters in Glendale pass a little piece of that history every day as they walk one of the corridors on the campus: a 1910 Johnson Empress sedan. 

courtesy Chris Cleave/Simon & Schuster

When novelist Chris Cleave starts a new project - before he writes a word - he tries to immerse himself in the world his characters will inhabit.

Four years ago, that meant learning to track bicycles for his novel, Gold, about two Olympic-caliber cyclists.  But it was a more complex prospect for his latest novel, Everyone Brave is Forgiven, which is set in World War II London and Malta.  But Cleave found a way.

Stacy Tornio

Sometimes all we need to rejuvenate our minds, bodies and spirits is a bit of fresh air. Fortunately our outdoor adventure contributor, Stacy Tornio, has created a concept that utilizes the nature that surrounds us.

Phil Bernhagen

Turn on the TV just about any time of day, and you’ll likely to find a TV show about people doing home improvement projects. Many of them are trying to increase a home's resale value, and some of them are known as "house flippers," people who buy a home at a low price with the intent to turn a large profit on the property.

While it might seem like local home remodeling team John Kannenberg and Dave Jacob might fall into that latter camp, they believe their work in Milwaukee's North Shore is worlds away from "flipping." 

Macmillan Publishers

Many novels begin by setting the protagonist in a brand new world. Something fundamental changes in their lives and everything that character once knew is suddenly ripped away. It happens in real life too.

Oleg Doroshin, Fotolia

The weather was beautiful over the weekend around most of southeastern Wisconsin. It was especially welcome because during April, it felt like it would never warm up and spring would never arrive. However, April was actually tremendously warm month across the globe and set a temperature record. 

George Stone is professor emeritus of natural science at Milwaukee Area Technical College and the now-retired organizer of the annual Sustainability Summit in Milwaukee.

Al / Flickr

Many of us have dreams of someday moving out of the city or the suburbs and settling down in a quiet place. The simplicity of rural America and small-town life is an appealing thought. But, as anyone who has actually lived in one of those places knows well, there's a difference between spending a week in a small town and actually living there.  

Cliff / Flickr

It probably comes as no surprise to hear that the Latino population in the Milwaukee area is skyrocketing. As with many cities around the country, people of Latino descent represent a much larger proportion of the population at large than at any other time in the nation’s history.

Claire Moseley

"Noise is part of our everyday life.," says Brendan Farrell, founder of HowLoud, Inc., a web-based service that maps noise levels in places around the country. HowLoud has multiple uses surrounding the noise level in any given area. Want to know which hotel is the quietest or if you'll hear airplanes in that new neighborhood? They will bring the information to you.

There are two factors that determine how loud an area is: the Soundscore (with adjectives to describe the noise source) and the map display.

Albert Lichtblau

Update: The paperback edition of "Born Survivors" has recently been published, and Wendy Holden will speak Monday (5/16/16) evening in Madison, along with Wisconsin physician Mark Olsky, one of the people her book profiles. 

Seventy years ago, three babies were born into desperate circumstances. Their mothers had been sent to almost certain death at the Mauthausen Concentration Camp in German-occupied Austria. Against unlikely odds, they were born and survived the camps along with their mothers.

Jerry Huddleston / Flickr

The Waffle House may seem an unlikely source of inspiration for chefs in a northern city like Milwaukee, especially when you consider there are no Waffle Houses in the state of Wisconsin. But the folks from Milwaukee Chefs for Homeless Vets are hoping the Southern-style fare will entice even the cheesiest of Cheeseheads to come out and support their cause. 

Kristopher Volkman / Flickr

Although rideshare apps like Uber and Lyft have continued to make headlines for various controversies, it's rare that we get an inside look at how they work. Milwaukee Magazine's article Driving Through Time: Confessions of an Uber Driver is a firsthand account of what it's like to be an Uber driver in Milwaukee.

Sean Hagen / Flickr

Some cities around the country have found a way to connect unemployed and underemployed people with work by requiring a certain number of them be hired for public works projects and other developments made possible through public dollars.

Milwaukee has one of those programs, called the Residents Preference Program, or RPP.

Milwaukee's program has been around for more than two decades. But in recent years, criticism has been leveled that RPP has not had the level of success many had hoped for it.

Fotolia

If you work for a big enough employer, it's likely that you've been urged to participate in the company's wellness program. It could be an educational seminar or an office-wide weight loss competition, something that incentivizes healthier lifestyle choices. The idea is healthy employees increase productivity and save a company money. 

Mitch Teich / WUWM

A lot happened in the life of a young duck named Phillip before he ended up at the Autumn Farm Sanctuary in Cedarburg.

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