Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 20 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

Ways to Connect

courtesy Chris Cleave/Simon & Schuster

When novelist Chris Cleave starts a new project - before he writes a word - he tries to immerse himself in the world his characters will inhabit.

Four years ago, that meant learning to track bicycles for his novel, Gold, about two Olympic-caliber cyclists.  But it was a more complex prospect for his latest novel, Everyone Brave is Forgiven, which is set in World War II London and Malta.  But Cleave found a way.

Ailments like carpal tunnel syndrome and premenstrual syndrome may seem completely different from penis theft, also known as koro, but they actually have a lot in common. All three can be classified as "culture-bound syndromes," perceived maladies informed by the cultures where they appear. 

Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

Primary voters in five more states brought the primary season closer to its conclusion yesterday.  Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump are still the most likely nominees of their parties for the presidency. 

The popularity of Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump this spring is an indication that retail politics are still important, according to contributor Art Cyr.

JohnPickenPhoto / Flickr

When catastrophes happen, we tend to look at them as stunning events that shock the places they hit and the world at large. Think of the collapse of the housing bubble, or the massive outbreak of Ebola in West African nations. But writer Michele Wucker says that there are far fewer complete surprises that we might think, and in many cases, catastrophe is something that can be foreseen and acted upon before it happens.

Maayan Silver

Birds of Chicago seek to harness the power of music and words to reassert their place in a world filled with insignificant online communication.

The term that sometimes gets used to describe their music is “secular gospel,” but there’s really a lot more in evidence from the music cooked up by husband-and-wife JT Nero and Allison Russell.  They came together in Chicago from different parts of the continent and different musical projects and pulled together a band that is figuratively (and literally) family.

WUWM has launched a new series and is inviting YOU to participate. We want to know what's got you scratching your head about the Milwaukee area.

Trapper Schoepp

Singer-songwriter Christopher the Conquered (a.k.a. Christopher Ford) was setting up for a Lake Effect interview and performance in WUWM's Studio C1 on Thursday afternoon when the news came out that Prince had passed away at age 57 at his Paisley Park compound in Minnesota.

The news first stunned him, and then inspired him to dust off a cover of the Prince-penned "Nothing Compares 2U." The song written and recorded in 1985, but was made famous in 1990 by Irish singer Sinéad O'Connor.

www.jackspann.com

Musician Jack Spann is not a musical newcomer. The St. Louis native has lived in New York for years and put his keyboard – and other musical talents to work with any number of other musicians. But the last couple of years have been big ones for Spann.

Sefton Ipock / Milwaukee Area Technical College

Tavis Smiley is something of a renaissance man. From modest beginnings in Indiana, Smiley worked briefly in politics for Los Angeles mayor Tom Bradley. Before long, he found a calling in broadcast media - first at the local level, then for a time at the cable channel Black Entertainment Television. 

Ballantine Books

The gulf between science and football might seem like a large one, but scientist and author Ainissa Ramirez would say they're more alike than you might imagine. Her latest book, Newton’s Football: The Science Behind America’s Gamelooks at the similarities between scientists and football fans.

l.madhavan / Flickr

As Earth Day approaches, Stacy Tornio of the Destination Nature has some suggestions for getting outside this week.  

1. Find Flowers

In early springtime, you can see daffodils, pacifica, tulips and lilacs. "Even though it's kind of bare out there, the flowers you do see are so bright and fresh and its makes you happy," says Tornio.

2. Earth Day of Service

Blue Rider Press

Baseball’s major league season is long, which is a good thing for some, annoying to others and a real grind to the people involved in it.

The Milwaukee Brewers enter this week with twelve games already in the books. If they were a football team that would represent three-quarters of their schedule. But this is baseball, so the Brewers are less than a tenth of the way to the finish line.

Victor / Flickr

About ten years ago, the name Frank Jude Jr. was a fixture in local news here. Jude won a substantial award after being the victim of a police beating outside a party thrown by a police officer in 2004.

And though Jude is no longer the high profile name that it once was, he has never faded entirely from the public scene. Nor have the controversy or legal issues around him.

CannonDesign

The Milwaukee Bucks agreed yesterday to a 30-year lease on the new arena, which they hope to begin construction on this summer. They’ll pay a minimum of a million dollars a year to the Wisconsin Center District. Meanwhile, another nearby project the Bucks are partnered with also took a step forward this week.

(Photo by Allen Kee / ESPN Images)

You can call ESPN2's "His & Hers" a lot of things: Distinctive. Fun. Boundary-pushing. But there's one term the hosts, Michael Smith and Jemele Hill, would prefer you don't use.

"It's not that 'debate' is necessarily a dirty word," Hill says, "but we like to think that we really pay attention to the nuance of discussions."

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