Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 25 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball and his skating children, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

Ways to Connect

Michelle Maternowski

It’s widely understood that Milwaukee is a segregated metropolitan area. But what’s less-appreciated is how segregation connects to other social issues the area faces.

Soon-to-be-released research by UW-Milwaukee professor Marc Levine links segregation to a key factor that overlays it – poverty. Levine is the director of UWM’s Center for Economic Development.

Mitch Teich

Writer Kwame Alexander has penned more than a dozen books for young readers. His novel-in-verse, The Crossover, won the Newbery Medal in 2015. It tells the story of two basketball playing twin brothers, and was followed up by another novel-in-verse, Booked, which has a soccer theme. 

Louisa Thomson / Flickr

Segregation is connected to issues ranging from education to housing to health. So, it’s no coincidence that evictions disproportionately affects certain neighborhoods in Milwaukee.

Writer and researcher Matthew Desmond chronicled the issue of eviction and its impact in Milwaukee last year in the landmark book, Evicted.

LISTEN: 'Evicted' Book Paints a Heartbreaking Picture of a Milwaukee Under Stress

Michael / Fotolia

The issues facing the Great Lakes are often referred to in chronological terms. From the cryptosporidium outbreak that affected Milwaukee water in 1993 to the suffocating invasions of - first, zebra mussels, then quagga mussels. Plus the decline of the lake trout and perch population, and the fall in water levels are key problems we face today.

erikaslezak.com

The United Performing Arts Fund, or UPAF, supports arts organizations of various types across Milwaukee, from music to the visual and performing arts.  The organization began in 1967 as a way to stabilize the finances of Milwaukee's prominent performing arts groups, including the Milwaukee Repertory Theater.

Mike Magione

Milwaukee-area musician Mike Mangione's podcast, called Time & The Mystery, is described as a series of artist-to-artist conversations with musicians, actors, comedians and others about the philosophy behind what they do and how they connect with their audience.

There are a lot of people who spend decades trying to figure out what to do with their lives, reinventing themselves as they go.  And that may well be the case for Gabe Burdulis and Thea Grace, but that's not their plan at the moment.

Wolfgang Gauch

Cellist Robert Cohen joins Lake Effect every month to talk about the life of a working professional musician in a segment called On That Note. Cohen, who is a member of the Milwaukee-based Fine Arts Quartet, plays at venues around the world, and often speaks with Lake Effect's Bonnie North about his travels. 

Growing Power Facebook

Many people garden in the warmer months, growing anything from berries to beans. But beyond plants, how many of those people would also be interested in a year-round endeavor of producing their own fish?

Adam Ryan Morris / Milwaukee Magazine

For many people in Milwaukee, their fish consumption increases exponentially during the season of lent.  But for others, the Friday fish fry is simply part of the year-round culture.

Regardless of how you come down on the issue, our dining contributor Ann Christenson tips the scales towards some of the top fish frys in town in the current issue of Milwaukee Magazine.

Courtesy of Dr. Fran Kaplan, Coordinator, America’s Black Holocaust Virtual Museum

Lynchings of African-Americans were not uncommon in the United States, well into the last century. But like much of the history of racial tensions in America, the common notion is that these extrajudicial murders just happened south of the Mason-Dixon. 

Gidzy / Flickr

Major national publications, from the Washington Post to Politico, reported this week that the Trump Administration is likely to work to repeal, or drastically scale back the Clean Power Plan enacted during the Obama Administration.

The Milwaukee Rep

Veterans of conflicts like Korea and Vietnam might scarcely recognize how wars are being fought today, and how they’ll be fought in the future.  For one, women represent a larger portion of our armed forces than ever before.  Secondly, the people doing the fighting need not always be on the battlefield or in the air above it.

Mitch Teich

Heather Terhune knows a lot about ice. The executive chef at Tre Rivali has a lot of opinions about the ice used at the restaurant, a fact she let slip at the first MilMag Live! event on the influence of insiders and outsiders in Milwaukee. 

Esther Nisenthal Krinitz / Art and Remembrance

The current refugee crisis is by no means the first the world has confronted.  Over the years, waves of refugees have come from places as varied as Bosnia, Somalia, Vietnam and, 70 years ago, World War II caused mass displacement in Eastern Europe.

Esther Nisenthal Krinitz was one of those refugees.  She escaped Poland as a teenager during the Nazi occupation, and eventually settled in the United States. It was years after she came to the U.S. that she took the story of her childhood and turned it into unique artwork made from fabric.

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