Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 25 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball and his skating children, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

Ways to Connect

Mitch Teich

Wisconsin-based band Dead Horses' last album, Cartoon Moon, garnered national praise and earned the band three Wisconsin Area Music Industry awards this spring, including album of the year.

denisismagilov / Fotolia

Wisconsin's Senate is expected to take up legislation this fall requiring high school students to receive financial literacy education before they graduate.

Currently, only a minority of states require such education.

That squares with new data collected by Milwaukee-based organization, SecureFutures. The group commissioned a study of some 500 teens around the country about their own finances and how they learn about money management.

Mitch Teich

Despite the politically polarized climate, the U.S. Senate this week held bipartisan hearings on proposed changes to the Affordable Care Act.  The hearings come in the wake of a failed effort by the White House and GOP Congressional leaders to repeal and replace the law known as Obamacare over the summer.

The bipartisanship has been greeted by many as a welcome change, and some analysts are optimistic that it could lead to legislation that would make the AC work more smoothly.

The neighborhood known as Silver City is located on Milwaukee’s south side, running from Layton Boulevard to Miller Park Way, with the Menomonee Valley along its north border and Greenfield Avenue to the south.  It’s one of the city’s most ethnically diverse places.  But for years, it suffered from an image problem as nearby factory jobs dried up.

Mitch Teich

Political analyst Charlie Sykes joins Lake Effect in studio to discuss the ramifications of the Trump administration's decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, the rocky road ahead for President Trump, and more locally, the resignation of former Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke.

Trump administration announces end to the DACA program. 

"Unsolved" / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

The second season of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel’s Unsolved podcast begins with the following clip:

The real-life challenges surrounding sex, power, and consent on college campuses are the inspiration for a new novel by author Tom Perrotta. Mrs. Fletcher tells the story of Eve, a divorced mom who suddenly finds herself an empty nester after dropping her son off at college.

Brendan is her son, and he gets to school with a certain attitude towards women and sex that he finds challenged when he gets there. Meanwhile, Eve is having, perhaps the opposite awakening. It’s a novel that is both uncomfortable and humorous.

Monkey Business / Fotolia

For the most part, college students are back on campus and in class. For freshmen, it’s often their first real taste of freedom, a time when they’re becoming adults and breaking free of limitations they’ve had at home.

It’s also a time of experimentation for many - with alcohol, street drugs and with sex. Sex and how it fits into university life is a complex one, with hook-ups co-existing with greater awareness of sexual assault and the importance of consent.

Depending on where you live in the United States, you might might describe your weekend getaway differently. Here in Wisconsin, you might head up to your cottage. Or maybe it’s your cabin - that’s how people in Minnesota generally refer to it. In the northeast - places like Maine and the Adirondacks - people talk about going to their “camp.”

Kimpton Journeyman Hotel

Many of us might be thinking of a getaway for the upcoming Labor Day weekend, but for people from elsewhere, Milwaukee is a destination.  And when they get here, they’ll be coming to a place that has seen a dramatic increase in the number of hotels and hotel rooms available.

the_lightwriter / Fotolia

Think about all the things you have that connect to the internet. Your smartphone and your computer, obviously. But then there’s the fitness tracker on your wrist. Or the app in your car that lets you check whether you’ve locked the doors. Or maybe it’s your TV set.

It’s the Internet of Things, or IoT, and it’s changed the way many of us live. But it’s also exposed us in new ways to hackers and other people who might seek to do us harm. How safe are we in the IoT landscape?

Back in January, we featured an interview with the leaders of an ambitious effort to improve the health of people living in Dodge County (see below).  The Blue Zones Project takes a page from the examples set by people who live in places with the longest life expectancy and looks at how those practices can be put into place.

courtesy Valerie Stull/MIGHTi

At the Wisconsin State Fair this month, among the extreme food offerings - like, say, the deep-fried bacon-wrapped olives on a stick - was one menu option you might have missed: cricket nachos

aerogondo / Fotolia

A murder on Milwaukee’s north side two years ago is the jumping off point for a week-long series the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel launched Sunday on the issue of witness intimidation.

The series, The Intimidator, was produced by reporter Ashley Luthern and John Diedrich. It explores some of the common and sometimes brutal tactics employed by those trying to keep witnesses from coming forward. 

Safe House Milwaukee

For a half-century, the Milwaukee restaurant - the Safe House has served a helping of Cold War history alongside burgers, fries, and drinks.  The restaurant was founded by Dave Baldwin, a connoisseur of the Cold War and espionage.  The ownership changed hands more recently, but the walls of the Safe House are still adorned with memorabilia from the Cold War era.

And while its day-to-day missions are food and entertainment, the restaurant not long ago hosted two people with strong connections to the Cold War.

Pages