Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 25 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball and his skating children, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

Ways to Connect

Amy Lombard

Lane Moore appreciates dating app blunders so much that she decided to make them happen live in her comedy show, Tinder LIVE! Ahead of Moore’s Friday Turner Hall show in Milwaukee, she joins Lake Effect to discuss how swiping left and right in real-time went from an inside joke to a comedy she says everyone can relate to.

Australian writer Graeme Simsion knows his latest novel isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, but he’s OK with the conversations that will come out of it.

The Best of Adam Sharp explores subjects from marriage to infidelity to lost love, while working in some classic rock as well.

“One of the questions I was asking was how far will someone go to save a marriage? And I was also asking about the difference between romantic love and what you might call companionate love,” Simsion says.

HMHBooks / Twitter

Paul Theroux is widely regarded as one of the finest living American writers. But really, he’s a writer of the world. His fifty-year career encompasses travelogues such as The Old Patagonian Express and Deep South, and novels ranging from The Mosquito Coast to Hotel Honolulu.

f11photo / Fotolia

Don’t look now, but we’re already into June and into that fleeting period in Wisconsin known as summer. Maybe you have big plans for the summer - but even the busiest among us have those summer days, or nights, where we’re considering how to spend our time.

"The best part of summer is that it always revives that child-part in us, and here in Milwaukee I think it really does that," says Milwaukee Magazine editor-in-chief Carole Nicksin. 

David Haynes, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

WUWM and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel hosted Across the Divide: New Realities for Immigrants, an event at Carroll University in Waukesha. On Monday, May 22, panelists shared their thoughts and experiences with community members about an issue that is as complicated as ever.

Meet the panelists:

Mitch Teich

At the end of another intense news week, Lake Effect news analyst Charlie Sykes marvels at a fast pace cycle, which doesn't seem to slow down.

"We're living in an era," he says, "in which every day, there's a story - a revelation - that in a different world would have dominated the news for weeks in and of itself.  And yet, these are one news-cycle stories."

On Friday's Lake Effect, Sykes offered his take on several key issues that dominated the news (for a while, anyway) this week:

Forbes / Forbes Magazine

Institutions in the U.S. were generally spared the worst of the recent ransomware attack called WannaCry. But there's no guarantee the U.S. won’t bear the brunt of the next cyber-attack that comes along.

DFM Collection / Centre numérique des manuscrits orientaux

The continued depletion of religious diversity in the Middle East could be contributing to the death of one of the oldest living languages, known as Syriac.

The language holds both religious and historical significance, but as political turmoil wreaks havoc in the region, Syriac and its native speakers face an uncertain future. A group of scholars meeting this week at Marquette University is working to preserve both the language and the cultural traditions that accompany it.

Communist Daughter / Facebook.com

"It's the new album until tomorrow." On the last day of their tour, husband and wife musical team Molly and Johnny Solomon of Communist Daughter share exhausted breaths of post-tour pants-less desires and insight into their next project. 

edseloh / Wikimedia

True Swiss-style cheese that is made in Wisconsin may seem unlikely. While the Dairy State has produced quality cheese for over a century, mastering Swiss-style cheese-making requires near-perfect conditions. Fresh off a trip to Schuman's Cheeses near northern Wisconsin’s Turtle Lake, Jeanette Hurt found that Wisconsin cheese makers are creating products similar to the highly sought-after Alpine cheeses of Switzerland.

Courtesy of Milwaukee Public Library

Tuesday night, an organization whose work is tied specifically toward civil discourse, honors the legacy of its namesake.  The Zeidler Legacy event highlights not just the power of facilitated dialogue, but Milwaukee's mayor who served from 1948 to 1960. Frank Zeidler was the last Socialist mayor of a major American city and spent much of his life after leaving office as a mediator of disputes. 

Michael Vadon / Wikimedia

Developments in Washington have been coming at a breakneck pace in recent weeks, from the firing of FBI director James Comey to the changing explanations for it, to allegations that President Trump shared classified intelligence with Russian diplomats, to the appointment of a Justice Department special counsel to continue the probe into Russian influence in US electoral politics.

Bobby Tanzilo

WUWM's Bubbler Talk receives a lot questions from a lot of people about Milwaukee's streets. So, to end this season of Bubbler Talk, we found two 'road' scholars - historian Carl Baehr and OnMilwaukee's Bobby Tanzilo - to answer your questions in a lightning round.

Here we go:

Before jumping into the remnants, here's a bit of history on Milwaukee's Bridge War of 1845 - from John Gurda's book, The Making of Milwaukee:

lenetsnikolai / Fotolia

Last month, the House passed legislation intended to repeal and replace one of the Obama Administration's signature legacies: the Affordable Care Act, or ACA. Most analysts believe the bill, called the American Health Care Act, or AHCA, faces a very uncertain future in the Senate, which hasn't formally begun debate on the bill. 

Mitch Teich

The old maxim goes that looks can be deceiving.  In the case of singer-songwriter Carmel Mikol's new album, sounds can be deceiving as well.

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