Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 20 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

» Twitter: @mcteich

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paukrus / Flickr

This spring is the 100th anniversary of one of the most notorious maritime tragedies in history – but there is probably a lot you didn’t know about the sinking of the Lusitania.

Stephen Brashear / Getty Images

Last week, the Starbucks coffee chain announced its initiative to get people to talk about the sensitive issue of race.  The plan was pretty straightforward – have its baristas write #RaceTogether on coffee cups and initiative conversations. 

But the idea almost immediately became the source of ridicule on social media, criticized as heavy-handed or quixotic.

But take Starbucks out of the equation, and how do you initiate a dialogue about race relations and inequality?

Mike Wright, Flickr

In a mix of sports metaphors, Tuesday's Reading Blitz represents a full-court press for organizations trying to improve reading skills among Milwaukee kids.

The day's effort, sponsored by the United Way of Greater Milwaukee and Waukesha County, is the culmination of a concerted effort to increase the number of volunteer reading tutors in the community.  Community engagement specialist Karissa Gretebeck says the effort is aimed particularly at the youngest readers.

antoniamurphy.com

In the modern day rat race of our constant and busy lives, few people actually act on the common thought of leaving the city behind and heading out in search of a simpler lifestyle.

Antonia Murphy was brave enough to actually do it. Murphy is an American whose primary experience with farm life came from an ill-fated effort to care for her father's chicken.

mpessaris - Fotolia.com

There are a lot of factors, scientists say, that feed into climate change. Carbon emissions are high on the list, of course. But another culprit is increasingly sharing the blame. 

Even if you drive an electric car, even if you have solar panels on your house, even if you compost, recycle and reuse, your food consumption habits play into the climate change dynamic.

katie wheeler / Flickr

This month, the leaders of a task force studying arts, culture and recreation funding in Milwaukee County said a regional approach – including a limited-term sales tax – was the ideal way to build support for public and some private cultural assets.

These are places like the Milwaukee Public Museum, the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Marcus Center and others.

fotomek - Fotolia.com

The courtroom can be a contentious place. Things like the high-profile lawsuits and divorce cases you read about or see on television can drag on for days, weeks, or months.  And they can get nasty and leave a bad taste in everyone’s mouth when all is said and done.

Divorce law is one area where people have historically turned to mediation as an alternative to litigation.  But increasingly, mediation is being used in other areas, like estate and probate cases, where there are disputes over inheritances.

Milwaukee Public Schools

It’s probably not stretching things to point to a parallel in the decline of the manufacturing sector in Milwaukee, and the academic decline in a high school that has traditionally placed graduates into manufacturing jobs.  

Bradley Tech High School, by most measures, is struggling – so much so that Milwaukee Public Schools named it as one of just over a dozen schools worthy of extra intervention.

Milwaukee Police / Riemann

From Ferguson to New York to Milwaukee's Red Arrow Park, a lot has happened during the past year that's caused the relationship between the police and citizens to erode.

d76/Flickr

The Milwaukee County Board of Supervisors is expected next week to consider final approval of a program that would provide free bus rides to an estimated 30,000 disabled and senior riders a year on Milwaukee County Transit.

If it’s approved, the GO Pass program would go into effect at the beginning of April. The County’s Transportation director, however, has recommended a three-month delay in implementing the program to allow for broader distribution of passes.

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