Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 25 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball and his skating children, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

Ways to Connect

Milwaukee-born writer and historian John Gurda is a regular Lake Effect contributor. He’s the author of nineteen books, including The Making of Milwaukee, and his latest, One People, Many Paths: A History of Jewish Milwaukee. Our interview on Milwaukee’s water history is part of our series, Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water.

WUWM's Project Milwaukee: Black and White forum took place on Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 at the Mitchell Park Horticultural Conservatory - The Domes.

The panel of experts addressed race relations and the impact of segregation in Milwaukee from a variety of perspectives: education, business, social services, and unemployment.

Afterwards, roundtable conversations focused on exploring ways to improve and build a more integrated community.

The third section of our "Project Milwaukee: Black & White" forum on race relations, returned to the panel to hear their reactions to the audience’s comments, and concluded with suggestions for specific actions to move Milwaukee toward greater racial harmony and cooperation. Mitch Teich moderated the panel discussion.

Marc Levine is a professor of history and Director of the Center for Economic Development at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He tells Mitch Teich that it is possible to quantify segregation. You can hear more from Marc Levine as part of the WUWM's forum on race relations, which will be broadcast on Lake Effect tomorrow.

Renee Booker is the President and CEO of the North Avenue Community Development Corporation. Kori Schneider-Peragine is the Senior Administrator of the Community and Economic Development program for the Metropolitan Milwaukee Fair Housing Council. They spoke with Mitch Teich, and Schneider-Peragine explains how the council looks at neighborhoods in terms of the opportunity they afford.

Mark Wade is the President of the Board of Directors for the African World Festival. Festival organizers recently announced that this summer's three-day event on Milwaukee's lakefront will not take place; they do plan to hold other events throughout the year, including tomorrow's Celebrating Shades of Black cocktail party and dance at the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts. Wade tells Mitch Teich that he's optimistic the three-day festival will take place next summer.

Robert Miranda is the editor and publisher of the Spanish Journal; he’s also the Executive Director of Esperanza Unida, Inc. in Milwaukee. Troy Shaw is President and CEO of TDS Management, which produces diversity-themed television programming. They spoke with Mitch Teich about their frustrations about the state of relations between Milwaukee’s African-American and Hispanic communities and the white community.

Jill Florence-Lackey is the Executive Director of the Milwaukee-based firm, Urban Anthropology, Incorporated. The group has studied Milwaukee’s cultural groups for more than a decade. It also takes people on tours of Milwaukee's ethnic communities, including the area which was once Bronzeville. Florence-Lackey explained to Mitch Teich what the factors were that led to the creation of Bronzeville.

Race & Baseball

Jun 16, 2009

Jerry Poling is the Assistant City Editor of the Eau Claire Leader-Telegram. He's author of the book A Summer Up North: Henry Aaron and the Legend of Eau Claire Baseball, about Hank Aaron's year playing minor league baseball in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, published by The University of Wisconsin Press. He spoke with Mitch Teich from Eau Claire.

Rob Henken is the Executive Director of the Milwaukee-based Public Policy Forum, a non-partisan policy research organization. He spoke with Mitch Teich. The Forum has studied race relations in Milwaukee with several comprehensive reports in the past; you can find links here. Henken tells Mitch Teich what the forum's interest is in something as all-encompassing as race relations.

Lois Quinn is a senior scientist for the Employment and Training Institute at the UW-Milwaukee School of Continuing Education. She spoke with Mitch Teich as part of our Project Milwaukee: Black and White series on disparities in jobless rates and barriers to employment.

Margaret “Peggy” Rozga is a professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Waukesha. She was married to the late civil rights leader James Groppi from the time he left the priesthood in 1976 until his death in 1985. Patrick Jones is Assistant Professor of History and Ethnic Studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and author of The Selma of the North: Civil Rights Insurgency in Milwaukee, published by Harvard University Press. Margaret Rozga continues to be involved in issues of social inequity; she's also published a collection of poems about the fight for open housing.

Milwaukee-born writer and historian John Gurda is a Lake Effect contributor. He’s been studying the history of Milwaukee since 1972, and has authored 18 books, including The Making of Milwaukee. He gives Mitch Teich a brief overview of race relations in Milwaukee from the early 19th century through the 1950s.

Dr. Edith Burns is an associate professor of medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin in the Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology. She is also the Director of Ambulatory Geriatrics at the Zablocki Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Milwaukee, as well as the Program Director for the Medicine-Geriatrics Combined Residency Program in partnership with the Reynolds Foundation Initiatives in Geriatrics Education. Her research interests include immunology and aging.

Lori Kuban is an inspirational speaker, educator, and consultant. She is also a brain cancer survivor, which she was diagnosed with in December 2006. Kuban lives in Waukesha with her husband and two children. You can read her story here.

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