Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 25 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time watching baseball and his skating children, writing and looking for his reading glasses.

Ways to Connect

Technology & Teaching

Jun 2, 2010
LFT

Professor Heidi Schweizer discusses whether technology can be the answer to the achievement gap. Schweizer is an associate professor of education at Marquette University and Director of the Center for Electronic Learning there. She spoke with Mitch Teich about how she believes technology and virtual learning can play a key role in the future of urban education. Their conversation is part of our "Project Milwaukee: Barriers to Achievement in MPS" series.

Teachers for a New Era

Jun 1, 2010

As we examine how teachers are taught, a program at UWM seeks to make becoming a teacher like becoming a doctor. Marleen Pugach is a Professor and Linda Post is an Associate Professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at UW-Milwaukee, and both are co-principal investigators for the Teachers for a New Era program, a grant funded by the Carnegie Corporation to improve the quality of teacher education. They spoke with Mitch Teich as part of our "Project Milwaukee: Barriers to Achievement in MPS" series.

The Dean of Marquette University's College of Education, Bill Henk, believes the traditional schools have something to learn from the alternative certification model. Henk is also a professor of literacy there. He spoke with Mitch Teich as part of our "Project Milwaukee: Barriers to Achievement in MPS" series.

Milwaukee writer Barbara Miner questions whether Teach For America does more harm than good in urban schools. Miner is a freelance writer in Milwaukee. Her article, “Looking Past the Spin” on Teach for America, appears in the spring issue of the education journal Rethinking Schools. She spoke with Mitch Teich as part of our "Project Milwaukee: Barriers to Achievement in MPS" series.

Val Klump is a senior scientist and Director of the Great Lakes WATER Institute at UW-Milwaukee. Rebecca Klaper is a Shaw Associate Scientist at the institute. They spoke with Mitch Teich as part of the Project Milwaukee series, "The Currency of Water."

Matt Parlow is a law professor at Marquette University Law School. Peter Rofes also teaches law there, and is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. They spoke with Lake Effect's Mitch Teich in June.

Robert Glennon is the Morris K. Udall Professor of Law and Public Policy at the University of Arizona, and author of the book Unquenchable: America's Water Crisis and What to Do About It, published by Island Press. He spoke with Mitch Teich as part of our "Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water" series. Glennon was in Milwaukee this week to speak at a forum at Marquette University.

Katherine Bliss is a senior fellow of the Global Health Policy Center at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, DC. She spoke about global water and sanitation issues this fall at the Institute of World Affairs at UW-Milwaukee. You can find her report on US leadership on drinking water and sanitation here.

Rich Meeusen is the Chairman, President, and CEO of Milwaukee-based Badger Meter, a company that makes water meters. He's also Co-Chair of the M7 Water Council. He spoke with Lake Effect's Mitch Teich as part of our series, Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water.

Milwaukee-born writer and historian John Gurda is a regular Lake Effect contributor. He’s the author of nineteen books, including The Making of Milwaukee, and his latest, One People, Many Paths: A History of Jewish Milwaukee. Our interview on Milwaukee’s water history is part of our series, Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water.

WUWM's Project Milwaukee: Black and White forum took place on Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 at the Mitchell Park Horticultural Conservatory - The Domes.

The panel of experts addressed race relations and the impact of segregation in Milwaukee from a variety of perspectives: education, business, social services, and unemployment.

Afterwards, roundtable conversations focused on exploring ways to improve and build a more integrated community.

The third section of our "Project Milwaukee: Black & White" forum on race relations, returned to the panel to hear their reactions to the audience’s comments, and concluded with suggestions for specific actions to move Milwaukee toward greater racial harmony and cooperation. Mitch Teich moderated the panel discussion.

Marc Levine is a professor of history and Director of the Center for Economic Development at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He tells Mitch Teich that it is possible to quantify segregation. You can hear more from Marc Levine as part of the WUWM's forum on race relations, which will be broadcast on Lake Effect tomorrow.

Renee Booker is the President and CEO of the North Avenue Community Development Corporation. Kori Schneider-Peragine is the Senior Administrator of the Community and Economic Development program for the Metropolitan Milwaukee Fair Housing Council. They spoke with Mitch Teich, and Schneider-Peragine explains how the council looks at neighborhoods in terms of the opportunity they afford.

Mark Wade is the President of the Board of Directors for the African World Festival. Festival organizers recently announced that this summer's three-day event on Milwaukee's lakefront will not take place; they do plan to hold other events throughout the year, including tomorrow's Celebrating Shades of Black cocktail party and dance at the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts. Wade tells Mitch Teich that he's optimistic the three-day festival will take place next summer.

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