Rachel Morello

Education Reporter

Rachel joined WUWM in January 2016 as the station's first education reporter.

A graduate of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism, Morello previously covered the education beat for StateImpact Indiana, a collaborative public radio/public television reporting project focused on explaining the effects of school-related state policy on people's lives. Her own academic background includes experiences in alternative, public and private schools, as well as homeschooling. 

Rachel is a Milwaukee native and considers herself a proud cheesehead (Go Pack!) She likes to spend her weekends taking advantage of the city's lakefront, as well as its breweries and arts scene. 

Rachel Morello

Update, 3:45p.m.: In a joint statement Friday afternoon, County Executive Abele and Commissioner Means expressed their disappointment about MPS' decision regarding the duo's OSPP proposal -- and offered district leaders another chance to join them. 

Rachel Morello

On Wednesday night, the voices behind WUWM’s collaborative series Precious Lives took to the stage at the Pabst Theater. Precious Lives: The Live Show featured two dozen kids and adults from the Milwaukee area whose lives have been affected by gun violence. For most of the young people involved, this was the first time they shared their stories onstage in front of a large audience.

Kristine Hinrichs

Even if you’ve spent only a little time in Milwaukee, you’ve likely noticed some unusual figures lurking on city sidewalks. They’re big and blue, dotting street corners across Milwaukee. 

One sits right outside Kristine Hinrichs’ condo downtown, on the corner of 3rd Street and St. Paul Avenue.

“I’ve lived downtown almost 25 years, and they’re everywhere,” Hinrichs remarks.

Rachel Morello

Milwaukee Public Schools' Board of Directors voted to pass a 2017 budget plan at their monthly meeting Thursday night. 

We know what you might be thinking: budgets are dense. Lots of numbers, figures and heavy education-related jargon. 

Rachel Morello

When school budgets are tight, arts programming is typically the first thing to go. That's not been the case lately in Milwaukee Public Schools.

Since 2012, the district has put an emphasis on music, dance, theater and visual arts, adding teachers and class time when possible.

And the powers that be are taking notice. MPS will soon receive some more federal funding to help bring art into other parts of the school building.

Rachel Morello

Many things happening on Milwaukee’s education scene are ripe for debate – school vouchers, testing and budgets, to name a few.

Rafael Ben-Ari, Fotolia

The Obama administration is taking a stance in the debate over rights for transgender people.   ­

On Friday, the federal departments of Education and Justice released guidance to public schools. They say transgender students should be allowed to use the bathroom aligned with their gender identity.

Rachel Morello

This week, WUWM’s “Getting There” series is looking at the issue of truancy in Milwaukee’s public schools. Today, we look to the end of the school year with parents and school leaders.

Rachel Morello

This week, WUWM’s “Getting There” series is looking into the issue of truancy in Milwaukee’s public schools. Today, we visit another group working to improve attendance rates in MPS buildings.

It’s just after seven o’clock on a Thursday morning at Milwaukee’s Rogers Street Academy.

Eight young adults, ranging in age from 18 to 24, line the hallways. Their cheers welcome students for another day of class.

“G-O-O-D-M-O-R-N-I-N-G, good morning! Good morning!” they chant.

Rachel Morello

It’s day three of our WUWM’s “Getting There” series exploring the issue of truancy in Milwaukee’s public schools. Yesterday, we heard what other cities are trying to get kids to school. Today, we learn more about what’s happening in MPS.

digital_3rd_eye, Flickr

Update: Since UW-Madison's faculty senate passed its no-confidence vote last week, campus leaders at UW-Milwaukee, UW-River Falls and UW-La Crosse have approved similar measures of their own.

Original post, May 2: Faculty leaders at the University of Wisconsin System's flagship campus approved a no-confidence vote Monday. 

Martha Dalton/WABE

This week, WUWM's "Getting There" series explores school attendance around Milwaukee. Today, we examine what other cities have tried to get students in their seats. 

The year was 2011. The truancy rate in New York City public schools had hit 20 percent

District leaders decided to try something new and simple: calling the kids who weren’t showing up.

Don Harder, Flickr

The word ‘truancy’ has one, clear definition: "the act or condition of being absent without permission." Some refer to it as ‘playing hooky.’ It’s also called absenteeism. Whichever way you spin it, it means you’re not showing up for classes.

When Dexter Weaver was a kid, as far as school was concerned, truancy was a four-letter-word.

“I had to go to school unless I was bleeding, or vomiting - a lot!” Weaver jokes. “Other than that, I was in school.”

YouTube/The Tab

Here's a story that defines "modern romance."

A social media storm rained down on the UW-Madison campus last week, as two students used the Snapchat app to make a romantic connection.

The students – identified as “Vikings Fan” and “Mystery Girl” – noticed each other on Snapchat’s location-based story, and began sending video messages back and forth. They had never met before. After communicating throughout the day, they began trying to track each other down. 

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