Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson

International correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is based in Berlin and covers Central Europe for NPR. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning programs including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

She was previously based in Cairo and covered the Arab World for NPR from the Middle East to North Africa. Nelson returns to Egypt on occasion to cover the tumultuous transition to democracy there.

In 2006, Nelson opened the NPR Kabul Bureau. During the following three and a half years, she gave listeners in an in-depth sense of life inside Afghanistan, from the increase in suicide among women in a country that treats them as second class citizens to the growing interference of Iran and Pakistan in Afghan affairs. For her coverage of Afghanistan, she won a Peabody Award, Overseas Press Club Award and the Gracie in 2010. She received the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award from Colby College in 2011 for her coverage in the Middle East and Afghanistan.

Nelson spent 20 years as newspaper reporter, including as Knight Ridder's Middle East Bureau Chief. While at the Los Angeles Times, she was sent on extended assignment to Iran and Afghanistan following the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. She spent three years an editor and reporter for Newsday and was part of the team that won the 1997 Pulitzer Prize for covering the crash of TWA Flight 800.

A graduate of the University of Maryland, Nelson speaks Farsi, Dari and German.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: We've been spending some time this morning listening to people who are following the U.S. presidential election from afar, from other countries. And let's go now to Germany, where there is more interest than usual, especially in one leading candidate with German roots. Here's NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson. SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, BYLINE: The presidential candidate Germans want to talk about is Donald...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: The country that has opened its arms to so many of the migrants flowing into Europe is becoming noticeably less welcoming. Germany packed onto a plane last week Afghans it judged to be economic migrants and sent them back to Kabul. Germany's Parliament has also passed new laws making deportation easier. And one thing that didn't help, the German government admitted it did not know the whereabouts of 130,000 of...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kr9SsshX2EA Like many European countries, Germany wants to send more asylum seekers back home. The German parliament passed several laws on Thursday that make it easier to deport migrants. The day before, Chancellor Angela Merkel's government sent a charter plane filled with Afghan migrants back to Kabul. Many asylum seekers say they've gotten the message — and aren't waiting to be shown the door. They're going home voluntarily, rather than being forced back. On...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST: British Prime Minister David Cameron says a deal he made last night with other European leaders in Brussels will protect the U.K. from being taken over by Europe's ever-closer union. But as NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports, the British leader still has to persuade his cabinet, the parliament and British voters that the new agreement is enough reason for them to stay in the EU. SORAYA SARHADDI...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: European leaders have reached a deal to help keep Britain in the 28-member European Union. The agreement follows a series of meetings between British Prime Minister David Cameron and other European leaders. NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson has been monitoring the summit from Berlin and joins us now. And Soraya, first, tell us about this deal. SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, BYLINE: Well, it's interesting because I think it's...

Donald Trump wrote in his 1987 book, The Art of the Deal, that his grandfather came from Sweden. These days, the Republican presidential hopeful and real estate mogul embraces different paternal roots. The teetotaler's grandfather actually comes from a medieval wine-making village called Kallstadt, in the southwestern German state of Rhineland Palatinate. Like many Americans of German descent, the Trumps apparently stopped referring to their German heritage during the World Wars. Trump brags...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: A 94-year-old man who served as a guard at the Auschwitz concentration camp more than seven decades ago goes on trial today in Germany. The charges - 170,000 counts of accessory to murder. He is one of several elderly Germans who will be on trial this year for Nazi war crimes. Let's turn to NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson, who is on the line from Berlin. Soraya, good morning. SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, BYLINE...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Are refugees still welcome in Denmark? Many Danes say yes, despite a new, controversial law requiring police to seize cash and other valuables from asylum seekers arriving in the Nordic country. There's widespread criticism in Denmark of the new law, even as many Danes are nervous about the rising number of asylum seekers. The pretty Baltic port town of Sonderborg is one of many Danish communities sending mixed signals to asylum seekers these days. It hosts scores of migrants at an asylum...

Denmark is expected to adopt a law on Tuesday requiring police to seize cash and other valuables from some asylum seekers as they enter the country.
The seizures, which would go toward defraying the cost of refugee care, are being widely criticized as a violation of human rights. In Elsinore, the eastern Danish city where Shakespeare's Hamlet is set, asylum seekers at a Red Cross center learn rudimentary Danish as they wait to hear whether they will be allowed to stay in Denmark. But...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Let's travel to a country whose leaders want migrants to go elsewhere. Denmark's parliament is scheduled to vote tomorrow on a bill aimed at migrants. Among other things, it calls for ceasing cash and valuables from asylum-seekers as they enter the country. The bill sponsors say it's to defray the costs of accommodating them. NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is covering this story. And, Soraya, where are...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: We're heading to Europe now where the welcome for asylum seekers is wearing thin. More than a million people sought refuge in the European Union last year, and people continue to try to make their way from the Middle East and Africa. Many in the 28-nation bloc are taking steps to try to keep more people from coming. In Denmark, a controversial bill calling on police to confiscate cash and valuables...

German ire about illegal immigration is focused on North African asylum seekers these days, as police investigate dozens of suspects from that region in mass incidents of groping and theft and several cases of rape that occurred on New Year's Eve in Cologne and other cities. Members of Germany's ruling coalition have vowed to speed up the review of North Africans' asylum applications, especially since the number of migrants from that region is rising. North African countries account for a...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Leaders of the European Union have begun wondering just what some of the union's newest members are up to. Consider Poland, which has a new government. The actions of that government are now the subject of a formal inquiry by the European Union. The European Commission, to be specific, is asking if Poland is violating the rule of law in ways that could lead to Poland losing its vote in the EU. It's the first time...

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