Stephanie Lecci

Lake Effect Web Producer

Stephanie joined WUWM in September 2008 as the Coordinating Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Stephanie began her career as an editorial assistant at her hometown newspaper, The Oyster Bay Guardian, on Long Island, NY. She fell in love with radio while working in the news department of Northwestern University’s campus radio station, WNUR. Later Stephanie interned at WALK-FM on Long Island, NY, the Daily Herald in Elgin, IL, WGN Radio in Chicago, IL, and at WBEZ Chicago Public Radio.

Prior to joining WUWM, she worked as a freelance reporter and news producer at WBEZ Chicago Public Radio where she reported on religion and arts stories and helped prepare the local newscasts during Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Stephanie also held the position of associate producer of the nationally syndicated political radio show, Beyond the Beltway with Bruce DuMont.

Stephanie holds a bachelors degree in journalism from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, Evanston, IL.

Stephanie lives on the East Side and loves oldies music, movies and anything by Aaron Sorkin.

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Civil War
2:24 pm
Sun September 16, 2012

Web Exclusive: The Father of Battlefield Medicine

Jonathan Letterman, the "father of Battlefield Medicine"

One hundred fifty years ago on September 17th, Union and Confederate soldiers met up near Sharpsburg, Maryland by Antietam Creek. The ensuing battle would become known as the bloodiest single day of fighting in American history, claiming 23,000 casualties. It would also mark a turning point in the American Civil War, committing the country to a prolonged and deadly conflict.

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Civil War
2:18 pm
Sun September 16, 2012

Web Exclusive: Rare Images of Antietam Offer Veterans' Look at Battle

Battlefield guide and author Stephen Recker's new book is "Rare Images of Antietam"

By the end of the day on September 17th, 1865, more than 23,000 Union and Confederate soldiers had been killed or wounded. The Battle of Antietam, near Sharpsburg, Maryland, was the bloodiest single day of the American Civil War - and in American history.

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Civil War
2:00 pm
Sun September 16, 2012

Web Exclusive: Clara Barton Transforms Role of Nurse on the Battlefield

The famous Civil War nurse and founder of the American Red Cross Clara Barton
Credit Photo courtesy of the National Park Service

One hundred fifty years later, it's hard to place enough significance on how the American Civil War would go on to shape our country and its people - or to overestimate the extreme loss of life it caused. Beyond the battlefields, however, the War Between the states also brought forth many firsts, such as the first Army ambulance corps, the first use of conscription of soldiers, the first black U.S. Army officer - the list goes on and on.

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Civil War
2:29 pm
Tue September 4, 2012

Iron Brigade & Beyond: The Black Hats Earns Their Better Alias at South Mountain

"Fighting" Joe Hooker, who was in command of the I Corps during the Battle of South Mountain, a precurser fight to Antietam.
Credit Photo courtesy of Library of Congress

In a couple of weeks, the United States will commemorate the 150th anniversary of one of the bloodiest battles of the Civil War – the Battle of Antietam. But just a few days before that well-known fight came another significant clash between Union and Confederate forces that would come to solidify the reputation of the Wisconsin soldiers in the Iron Brigade.

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Civil War
2:46 pm
Fri August 24, 2012

Iron Brigade and Beyond: Wisconsin in the Civil War - Groveton Begins Second Bull Run

It was the so-called "Black Hats" of Gen. Rufus King's division that battled at Brawner Farm. King himself was a prominent Wisconsinite and three Wisconsin regiments fought there.

Next Tuesday marks the 150th anniversary of the start of one of the biggest battles of the American Civil War: the Second Battle of Bull Run, otherwise known as Second Manassas. Many know of this enormous battle, but few know the story about the fight that started it - or the prominent role Wisconsinites played in it.

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Regional
10:34 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Why did Frontier Airlines Pull Out of Milwaukee?

Frontier Airlines now has only 7 daily flights into Milwaukee, and until now has been silent about why it downsized.
Credit Konstantin von Wedelstaedt

Lake Effect's Stephanie Lecci interviews Editor Mark Kass.

Just as recently summer last year, all was well between Frontier Airlines and Milwaukee. The airline had been touted as the new major player in the Milwaukee market since it was bought by its parent company Republic Airways Holdings in 2009. Frontier’s hub at General Mitchell airport was bustling with more than 80 departures a day. And it seemed that most of the hard feelings had dissipated after Republic folded hometown favorite Midwest Airlines into Frontier’s operations and brand.

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Regional
2:35 pm
Wed August 8, 2012

Magazine's List of Mass Shootings Prompts Recollection of Past Events

A chart included among Mother Jones' "Guide to Mass Shootings in America" depicts the number of weapons used that were bought legally vs. illegally.
Credit Mother Jones

In the aftermath of Sunday's tragic and deadly shooting at the Sikh temple in Oak Creek, a question many of us have is, "How could this happen in our own backyard?" And as the mass shootings in Aurora, Colorado occurred not even three weeks before those in Oak Creek, we also likely to be asking how such a violent act happened yet again.

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Arts & Culture
2:32 pm
Tue August 7, 2012

Expert: Sikhs Have Long Been Targets of Discrimination, Violence

Dr. Vijay Prashad discusses the discrimination Sikhs have felt acutely since 9/11.
Credit Trinity College

Sikhs have a rich history in and contributed greatly to the Milwaukee area - as they have had around the country.

But several sources have told us over the last couple of days that Sikhs have long been targets of discrimination and even violence, very much like the shootings at the Oak Creek temple. And while police maintain that they do not yet know of a motive behind Sunday's violence, it is hard for many in the community not to feel targeted once again.

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Civil War
2:58 pm
Fri August 3, 2012

Iron Brigade and Beyond: Wisconsin in the Civil War - Groveton Begins Second Bull Run

A monument to the soldiers lost at the fight at Groveton, also known as Brawner's Farm, that began Second Bull Run.
Credit Courtesy of Library of Congress

The end of this month marks the 150th anniversary of the start of one of the biggest battles of the American Civil War: the Second Battle of Bull Run, otherwise known as Second Manassas. Many know of this enormous battle, but few know the story about the fight that started it - or the prominent role Wisconsinites played in it.

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Wisconsin Economic Scorecard
3:34 pm
Thu July 19, 2012

Survey: Majority of Wisconsinites Feel State Headed in 'Right Direction'

It's been a little more than a month since Wisconsin's historic gubernatorial recall election. And while the state’s political rhetoric has finally begun to die down, even if the partisanship hasn't, national politics are just heating up. The country is still processing the landmark Supreme Court ruling upholding the Affordable Care Act, President Obama's signature health care reform law, although Governor Scott Walker has said he will not implement any health care changes until after the November election.

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