Susan Bence

Environmental Reporter

Susan Bence entered broadcasting in an untraditional way. After years of avid public radio listening, Susan returned to school and earned a bachelor's degree in Journalism from the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee. She interned for WUWM News and worked with the Lake Effect team, before being hired full-time as a WUWM News reporter / producer.

Susan is now WUWM's environmental reporter, the station's first. Her work has been recognized by the Milwaukee Press Club, the Northwest Broadcast News Association, and the Wisconsin Broadcasters Association.

Susan worked with Prevent Blindness Wisconsin for 20 years, studied foreign languages at UWM, and loves to travel.

Ways to Connect

A state lawmaker revealed a much-anticipated iron mining bill Monday. It’s still in draft form.
Senator Neal Kedzie of Elkhorn wants the Select Committee on Mining Jobs, which he heads - along with the public - to comment on both the preliminary document as well as a mining bill the Assembly passed last month.

We conclude our year-end tradition, Life’s Voices. WUWM shares the stories and perspectives of people making a difference, often without public fanfare. Today, our installment takes a green turn, as we meet a man dedicating his life to preserving open and wild spaces.

WUWM's Environmental Reporter Susan Bence spoke with Cherrie Nolden, who is researching how goats can be better used in managing land. Nolden lives in Prairie du Sac.

We continue our week-long series Project Milwaukee: State of Upheaval.

This first year of the Walker Administration may be remembered as one of Wisconsin’s most tumultuous political eras.

Early on, the governor created environmental waves by putting the brakes on much-anticipated wind turbine siting rules – stifling a fledgling industry.

Weeks have passed since Wisconsin Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald named a seven-member committee to suggest ways of streamlining the state’s mining rules. Momentum for change stems from an untouched stash of iron ore in northern Wisconsin. Proponents of the project say it promises employment in a job-starved region.Critics fear an intricate web of streams and wetlands that feed into Lake Superior would suffer irreparable impact.

Today, in honor of Veterans Day, we take you to an out-of-the-way story. WUWM discovered a group quietly trying to help homeless veterans find grounding in an urban garden.

WUWM Environmental Reporter Susan Bence visited the MillerCoors plant to find out how deeply “sustainability” runs through the 156-year-old brewery's veins – both in terms of building employee loyalty and in its drive to evolve into a more environmentally-friendly operation.

WUWM’s environmental reporter Susan Bence takes us to western Wisconsin when she visits Mark Shepard at his 106-acre perennial producing forest in Richland County. This weekend Shepard will travel to Milwaukee to teach the nuances of permaculture in an urban setting.

Gallery created by very hungery ash borer larva

We learn more about a new tool in the fight against the invasive emerald ash borer. Susan Bence is WUWM’s environmental reporter – she spoke with research intern Todd Johnson and Mary Holleback at the Riveredge Nature Center near Newburg, Wisconsin.

Restoring the KK River

Jul 25, 2011

WUWM’s Susan Bence talks with people working to restore the Kinnickinnic River. Bence is WUWM’s environmental reporter. The organizations working to repair and restore the Kinnickinnic River hope concrete removal will begin by 2013.

Buzz Surrounds Beepods

Jul 9, 2011

Advocates of living a green life, as well as making money doing it, are gathering this weekend at the Walworth County Fairgrounds, in Elkhorn Wisconsin. Organizers of EcoFair360 hope to lure attendees to workshops ranging from building an electric motorcycle to designing a green roof. A local businessman is “buzzing” out there to share his creation.

WUWM's environmental reporter, Susan Bence, spoke with people in Oak Creek who are looking to begin a new chapter in that community’s history books by transforming the lakefront from its current state of industrial blight.

This week WUWM is reporting on the potential of regional development within the corridor spanning from Milwaukee south to the greater Chicago area.

Today we poke into the health of the region's environment. We hear alerts when the air quality is poor because of exhaust and the particular air flow here – and air pollution can thwart the development of new factories. And we've been hearing plenty about the threat of Asian carp to Lake Michigan, coming via Chicago's link with the Mississippi River.

But WUWM Environmental Reporter Susan Bence learned about two projects in the region having healing affects on their surroundings.

According to a We Energies spokesman, the utility is in the early stages of determining whether its Valley Power Plant will be converted to natural gas burning from coal. Currently We Energies is carrying out a feasibility study, after which it must submit an application to the state’s Public Service Commission.

Susan Bence is WUWM's environmental reporter. She spoke Cleaner Valley Coaltion members Virginia Zerpa and Cheryl Nenn about the plan.

Wormy Work

Apr 22, 2011
Susan Bence

We mark Earth Day with a profile of a vermicomposter from Wauwatosa. WUWM environmental reporter Susan Bence spoke with Wauwatosa resident Heather Zydek. An Earth Day celebration will be held today at the Harley Davidson Museum. Learn about the beginnings of Earth Day.

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