Susan Bence

Environmental Reporter

Susan Bence entered broadcasting in an untraditional way. After years of avid public radio listening, Susan returned to school and earned a bachelor's degree in Journalism from the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee. She interned for WUWM News and worked with the Lake Effect team, before being hired full-time as a WUWM News reporter / producer.

Susan is now WUWM's Environmental Reporter, the station's first. Her work has been recognized by the Milwaukee Press Club, the Northwest Broadcast News Association, and the Wisconsin Broadcasters Association.

Susan worked with Prevent Blindness Wisconsin for 20 years, studied foreign languages at UWM, and loves to travel.

» Twitter: @WUWMenviron

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Environment
6:00 am
Thu January 30, 2014

Odor Concerns Follow Milwaukee Wastewater Treatment Company

Mark Kijek logs in his delivery. He has worked with AWS for nearly 15 years.

A cloud seems to be following a company that treats industrial wastewater. Advanced Waste Services wants to relocate from Milwaukee to Menomonee Falls, but is facing opposition.

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Environment
5:30 am
Mon January 27, 2014

Artist's Yearlong Subject: Milwaukee's Evolving Menomonee Valley

Grain elevator in the valley
E Daniel

Inside a former gasification plant in the Menomonee Valley, people will have a year to view Eddee Daniel’s evolving images of the valley – where years of neglect and today’s rebirth intertwine.

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Environment
11:54 am
Wed January 22, 2014

Milwaukee River Basin Gets C- On Its Report Card

The lower reaches of Milwaukee River ranked lowest in the watershed's water quality grades - earning a C- compared to B for its East and West branches

The health of Milwaukee’s rivers is improving, slightly, according to the 3rd annual report card from the Milwaukee Riverkeeper group.

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Environment
12:00 am
Wed January 15, 2014

State's Ferrous Mine Permitting - Streamlined or Bogged Down?

Credit S Bence

Wisconsin's new iron mining law is being put to the test. A recent announcement from the Army Corps of Engineers casts doubt on whether permitting will roll out as smoothly as planned.

The proposed iron ore mine would need state and federal approval because of potential impacts to the environment. Under the law passed last year, the company that has set out to develop the mine, Gogebic Taconite, could coordinate both governments’ requirements jointly. That should provide the company with a cheaper and easier process.

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Environment
4:07 pm
Mon January 13, 2014

Army Corps: Keeping Great Lakes Free of Asian Carp Could Cost Up to $18 Billion

Asian carp "flying" on the Illinois River overwhelm a boat of onlookers. (Courtesy of University of Wisconsin Sea Grant/Water Resources)
Credit Nerissa Michaels, Illinois River Biological Station

WUWM Environmental Reporter Susan Bence interviews Joel Brammeier, the President & CEO of the Alliance for the Great Lakes.

Milwaukeeans had their chance to voice opinions  on a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers report on preventing Asian carp from slipping into the Great Lakes; Thursday the Corps heads to Traverse City.

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