Tom Luljak

UWM Today Host

Tom Luljak is the Vice Chancellor of University Relations and Communications at the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee. In addition to directing the university's communication programs, Luljak serves as an associate lecturer in UWM's Department of Journalism and Mass Communication, teaching courses in corporate communications and sports marketing.

Luljak, who joined UW-Milwaukee in the Spring of 2000, earned his master's degree from UWM in mass communication. His bachelor's degree is from the department of Radio/TV/Film and Speech Education at the University of Wisconsin - Oshkosh.

Prior to his work at UWM, Luljak served as director of corporate communications at Blue Cross & Blue Shield United of Wisconsin, where he also served as executive director of the company's foundation. Luljak began his career as a broadcast journalist, and served as news director for WTMJ-TV, WTMJ-AM and WKTI-FM. His numerous broadcast journalism honors include the George Foster Peabody Award for Investigative Journalism.

Jon Strelecki

Finding a job that allows you to make money is one of the biggest rewards for finishing college. But, many of us spend a lifetime trying to figure out how to save and invest the money we earn.

At UW-Milwaukee, a group of students in the Lubar School of Business are getting valuable experience learning about how to do just that and they are using real money - $300,000 - that is on the line every day they come to class.

Jon Strelecki

Every year, more people die of heart disease in the U.S. than any other ailment. Recently a team of researchers discovered genetic mutations that might provide a clue to creating new treatments for heart disease.

On this edition of UWM Today, meet Paul Auer, a UWM researcher who is using his love of math to help answer some perplexing questions about why our hearts give out well before their time.

Jon Strelecki

One of the great challenges for researchers studying the health of freshwater lakes and rivers is seeing under the waves and around the mud and sand that are part of the environment. It takes a lot of hard work, ingenuity and special tools to get the job done.

On this edition of UWM Today, learn about the role that drone aircraft and aquatic robots play in gathering data under water.

One of the legacies of heavy industrial work along parts of the Lake Michigan shoreline in the 1950s is the pollution it left behind. In the waters off Green Bay, that pollution has had a profound impact on the production of flies. Why does that matter? Just ask a fisherman looking for walleyes in Green Bay.

On this edition of UWM Today, meet Jerry Kaster and Chris Groff, two UWM scientists involved in a fascinating research project that explores the world of mud and muck at the bottom of Green Bay.

Jon Strelecki

One of the benefits of UW-Milwaukee having the only school of freshwater sciences in the United States is the great expertise that exists in the school.

This edition of UWM Today focuses on one of the signature programs within the school - the developing field of aquaculture and aquaponics and doing so in an urban environment.

Jon Strelecki

On a previous edition of UWM Today, host Tom Luljak discussed UWM's Student Start Up Challenge, a program that helps students take their ideas and turn them into businesses. It is a way to give UWM students a real world experience of transforming a concept into a company.

One of the first Hollywood summer blockbuster movies is out and it is big. It is the latest version of Godzilla.

On this edition of UWM Today, take a look at the deeper meaning of this cult classic. Jason Jones, assistant professor of Foreign Languages and Literature in the Japanese program at UWM, has studied Japanese culture closely over the years and is writing a book that examines the meaning behind Godzilla - what it stands for and why this cultural icon has fascinated so many people around the world for so many years.

We often hear stories about technology getting in the way of healthy habits. Picture youngsters playing video games instead of a pickup game of baseball or basketball outside.

But a team of researchers at UWM have discovered that technology can also be the key to encouraging wellness.

Polly Ryan, associate researcher in the College of Nursing and Alice Fang Yan, assistant professor in the Zilber school of public health, are looking at ways to use smart phones and other technology to improve wellness.

Jon Strelecki

For many college students, studying abroad for a semester or two is often one of the highlights of their college experience. But, Americans are not the only ones leaving their country to go to college.

Today hundreds of thousands of students from countries around the world head to the U.S. to spend not just a semester, but years getting their entire college education here.

Crime Analysis at UWM

May 15, 2014
Jon Strelecki

If you are a fan of detective shows on TV, then you are familiar with that "A-Ha" moment. The point in the program where a clever investigator has an epiphany and suddenly piecing together a scattering of evidence, hunches and clues lead to the solving of a crime.

At UWM, there are classes being taught that help students learn how to analyze data in ways that really does solve crimes. It's all part of the field known as crime analysis. Host Tom Luljak speaks with Helen Bader School of Social Welfare Dean Stan Stojkovic.

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