The Art of Foreign Policy: Jerusalem, Political Rumor Mill, North Korean Threats

Dec 12, 2017

A pro-Islamic State group sought to tie a bomb explosion in New York City to last week’s announcement that the United States would recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. The announcement from the Trump Administration set off protests around the globe, many targeting U.S. embassies in Muslim-majority nations. 

So far, no other country has joined the United States in its decision, which was later countered by a European Union statement that the nations in the EU would not follow suit. Foreign policy contributor Art Cyr says this decision is a major move by the Trump Administration, and one he hopes they will use as a bargaining chip when dealing with Israel. 

"[Recognizing Jerusalem as the capitol of Israel is] a 'big chip,' as we might say if we were in one of the president's casinos, and I do hope we press to get something significant."

Cyr says, "There are things we can get after the fact, as well. It's a major move by the U.S. It's a 'big chip,' as we might say if we were in one of the president's casinos, and I do hope we press to get something significant."

As that situation continues to develop, rumors are once again swirling around Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. Sources say Tillerson has become increasingly alienated by the Trump Administration, but Cyr says it may just be gossip. 

"Washington is a nonstop rumor mill and that's been true since it became the nation's capitol. I can say that with great confidence," he explains. 

"Washington is a nonstop rumor mill and that's been true since it became the nation's capitol. I can say that with great confidence."

While the speculation on Tillerson's position may be gossip, Cyr believes there is one person in the administration who so far seems relatively untouched by the D.C. rumor mill and the turmoil impacting much of Trump's cabinet. 

"I think the Vice President might turn out to be the shrewdest player at the poker table, ultimately. Politically, because he and President Trump apparently are not close, by more reliable reports. And that’s fine - he has his own influence base, it may be to his advantage. But there’s a good chance that he’ll succeed," says Cyr.