Here and Now

Airs Weekdays at noon
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

This midday newsmagazine combines updates on the top national and international news stories of the day with intelligent, broad-ranging conversations. This daily conversation about news, arts and culture is hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson.

Distributed by: NPR, Produced at: WBUR

As part of a series of listening sessions across the country, representatives from the Bureau of Land Management recently came to Gillette, Wyoming, to meet with residents about the agency’s federal coal program.

The BLM says it wants to modernize the program to ensure American taxpayers receive a fair return on mining on federal lands. A reformed program will be an additional blow to the coal industry, already struggling with declining production and restrictive regulations.

Daniel James Brown‘s book about the University of Washington’s eight-oar rowing team, “The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics” was a bestseller for months when it was published in 2013.

The U.S. open gets underway today, and there’s a buzz in the air as Serena Williams tries to complete her first Grand Slam – winning all four major tennis competitions in one season.

For what is believed to be the first time in history, tickets for the women’s final sold out before tickets for the men’s final. Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins speaks with Jill Schlesinger of CBS News for a look at the U.S. Open and women’s tennis through a business lens.

Gyms and personal trainers across the country are watching new regulations coming from the Board of Physical Therapy in Washington, D.C. The board is preparing new guidelines that would make a registry of personal trainers and place further requirements on the industry.

Gyms fear Washington will be a testing ground for other states. Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Phillip Godfrey, a medical exercise specialist in Washington, D.C. who opposes the regulations.

As the nation marks 10 years since Hurricane Katrina, Here & Now has a special New Orleans edition of the DJ Sessions. Host Jeremy Hobson sits down with Nick Spitzer, a New Orleans resident and host of “American Routes,” from Tulane University and WWNO in New Orleans, distributed by PRX. He talks about the music that has resonated in the city since the storm, and how the music scene has changed.

A ruling yesterday from the National Labor Relations Board gave contract workers and employees of franchises a lot more leverage to unionize.

The NLRB’s decision gives those employees the right to negotiate a union contract not only with a franchise owner, but also with the larger parent company. It has implications in the fast food industry, which is locked in a national debate about worker pay and benefits.

Michael Regan of Bloomberg News discusses this with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

This week, students arriving at Old Dominion University could see banners hanging from a Sigma Nu fraternity house. “Rowdy and fun, hope your baby girl is ready for a good time,” and “freshman daughter drop off.” The signs were criticized for mocking sexual violence against women, and sparked national outrage.

A former student at St. Paul’s School, an elite New Hampshire prep school, is on trial for allegedly raping a freshman girl two days before graduation in 2014. The alleged assault is suspected to be part of a longstanding hook-up tradition at the Concord, New Hampshire, boarding school. Paige Sutherland from Here & Now contributor New Hampshire Public Radio reports.

Chinese Action Musical Comes To Denver

Aug 27, 2015

A new Chinese action musical is holding its U.S. premiere on a stage in Denver. “Terracotta Warriors 3D” is a live performance piece centered around the story of China’s first emperor, who was buried with an army of clay soldiers. It’s part of an effort to spread Chinese culture around the world. Corey Jones from Here & Now contributor Colorado Public Radio reports.

Update 2:23 p.m.: Franklin County Sheriff Bill Overton says the suspect in the shooting has died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Virginia State Police say that as they were pursuing the suspect in an on-air fatal shooting, he ran off the road and crashed, and was found suffering from a gunshot wound.

Virginia State Police spokeswoman Corinne Geller said Wednesday that the suspect is being treated for life-threatening injuries.

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