Here and Now

Airs Weekdays at noon
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

This midday newsmagazine combines updates on the top national and international news stories of the day with intelligent, broad-ranging conversations. This daily conversation about news, arts and culture is hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson.

Distributed by: NPR, Produced at: WBUR

The 2005 video of an offensive and lewd conversation between Donald Trump and Access Hollywood’s then-host Billy Bush stirred outrage and several endorsement reversals.

It has also presented some tricky questions for NBC, which announced it is suspending Billy Bush from his current position as anchor on the “Today” show.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik about how the scandal is playing out for the media company and its staff.

U.S. employers added 156,000 jobs in September, less than expected, and unemployment rose to 5 percent, from 4.9 percent, according to today’s Labor Department report.

Jobs growth has averaged 178,000 a month so far this year, down from last year’s pace of 229,000.

But there was positive news in wages — the average hourly earnings increased 0.2 percent over August, and were up 2.6 percent over September 2015.

Hurricane Matthew lashed Haiti, leaving the country with damaged infrastructure and hundreds dead.

In addition to physical damage, the island now faces health risks, the displacement of thousands and a logistical nightmare as its people try to rebuild their lives.

The 1831 Southampton Insurrection, or Nat Turner’s Rebellion, is the subject of the new film “The Birth of a Nation.”

The film tells the story of Turner, an African-American born into slavery. He was taught to read and eventually became a preacher to fellow slaves. In August 1831 he led an uprising of slaves against their white oppressors. While some view Turner as a hero, others question his heroism because of the number of women and children who were victims of the deadly rebellion.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is calling the city council’s approval of his plan to revamp police oversight a big step forward.

The plan creates a new agency to investigate police shootings and misconduct, and includes a civilian board. This comes in the wake of outrage after the release of a video showing an officer fatally shooting African-American teenager Laquan McDonald.

Chip Mitchell of WBEZ reports.

Who Is The New U.N. Secretary-General?

Oct 6, 2016

The United Nations Security Council today approved Portugal’s former prime minister Antonio Guterres as the next U.N. secretary-general, replacing Ban Ki Moon.

Guterres served 10 years as the U.N. high commissioner for refugees, a role he believes has prepared him to serves as secretary general.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Michael Doyle, a former U.N. assistant secretary-general, about Guterres and the role he will play on the world stage.

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A segment that aired on “The O’Reilly Factor” this week is drawing criticism for the way it stereotyped Asian Americans.

Fox News Correspondent Jesse Watters went to Chinatown in New York City to ask people on the street their opinion of Donald Trump and China-U.S. relations. He starts out by asking two women if he is supposed to bow to say hello, and goes on to incorporate a number of other stereotypes about Asian Americans.

The Benefits Of A Good, Long Yawn

Oct 5, 2016

A new study says that the size of a yawn can be used to predict to the size of one’s brain.

Researchers at the State University of New York at Oneonta studied 19 species, including humans, and found yawning to be a stimulant for brain growth.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson is joined by Sharon Begley, senior science writer for STAT news, for more on the study.

Looking for a new piece of art to display in your home? You could visit a local gallery. Or you could do what lots of galleries are doing these days: check out Instagram.

Hady Mawajdeh of KERA in Dallas takes a look at how the photo sharing app is seriously expanding the art world.

Supporters of Donald Trump have been defending the Republican presidential nominee, saying that Trump’s business genius was revealed by a New York Times story this weekend that found that Trump may have avoided paying federal income taxes for 18 years.

Journalist and author David Cay Johnston joins Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti to discuss his reporting today, which took a closer look at Trump’s taxes.

Uber is expanding its food delivery service, UberEats, planning to expand to at least 22 more countries in the next few months.

The delivery service launched in London and a few U.S. cities in the spring and summer, and this week began operating in Amsterdam, Dubai, Johannesburg and Tokyo. UberEats plans to be up and running in Stockholm, Jakarta, Bangkok and other cities within months.

Ash Vs. Evil Dead,” the television spin-off of the cult classic 1980s films, makes its return to Starz for season two on Sunday.

Bruce Campbell plays Ash Williams, a comical-yet-flawed character who returns to his hometown to fight evil. The series includes violent scenes that have no shortage of blood and gore for viewers, but how far is too far?

NPR’s Eric Deggans joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss the series’s return.

The United States owes African Americans reparations for its history of “racial terrorism,” according to a new report from a United Nations working group based in Geneva.

The team was invited by the U.S. government to conduct a fact-finding mission that explored the many ways in which racial discrimination has taken form, including police violence, mass incarceration and housing segregation; it also looks back in detail at slavery and the brutal practice of lynching.

This summer one of the largest birds in North America suddenly showed up in Washington state’s Puget Sound.

Squadrons of white pelicans have set area birders atwitter. They’re trying to figure out where the birds came from and what their arrival means.

While this rare sighting has been fun for bird watchers, Katie Campbell from Here & Now contributor Earthfix reports on why it may not be a good thing for the pelicans.

The newest Doritos have little flavor, no flashy color, minimal crunch and dull gray packaging. The kind of snack, essentially, that no one would choose.

And that, according to executives at Frito-Lay, is exactly the point.

The new chips are part of a campaign with Rock the Vote to boost voter registration among college students. Special vending machines placed on college campuses will be asking snackers whether they’ve registered to vote.