Here and Now

Airs Weekdays at noon
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

This midday newsmagazine combines updates on the top national and international news stories of the day with intelligent, broad-ranging conversations. This daily conversation about news, arts and culture is hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson.

Distributed by: NPR, Produced at: WBUR

To Ellen Stofan, the chief scientist of NASA, all of the space agency’s various research initiatives from roving the craters of Mars to photographing the icy surface of Enceladus are in pursuit of one basic question: Are we alone?

Short of finding life on other planets, however, NASA scientists are advancing the fields of astrophysics, astronomy and planetary science every day. Stofan joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson for a look at scientific research at NASA.

Senate Republicans have agreed to allow votes on two potential gun control measures, following a 15-hour filibuster led by Democratic Senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut.

Twenty years ago, after a mass shooting in Australia that killed 35 people, the government there enacted strict gun laws. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks to the former Deputy Prime Minister of Australia, Tim Fischer, about the challenges they faced and the lessons the U.S. government could learn.

Connecticut Democrat Chris Murphy ended a nearly 15-hour filibuster early this morning, saying Republican leaders had promised him they will hold votes on amendments to expand gun sale background checks and ban gun sales to people placed on security watch lists.

But NPR’s Sue Davis tells Here & Now‘s Robin Young that Republicans are expected to have enough votes to defeat the measures, even though polling this week shows support is growing for gun control.

Do Americans Know Enough About Science?

Jun 16, 2016

Here & Now‘s weeklong series on the state of science in America continues with a look at science literacy, and how much the general public knows about science.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Chad Orzel, associate professor at Union College, about Americans’ basic science understanding, and how much it matters.

Take the Pew Research quiz “How much do you know about science topics?”

Remembering Orlando Victim 'Top Hat Eddie'

Jun 15, 2016

Eddie Sotomayor was 34 when he died at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando on Sunday. Travel company owner Al Ferguson remembers his employee as a trailblazer in the gay travel industry, organizing the first gay cruise to Cuba this year.

Sotomayor became known in LGBT circles nationally as #tophateddie because he always wore a top hat at travel company events.

Hear more of our Orlando shooting coverage

Newtown Parents Reflect On Orlando Attack

Jun 15, 2016

President Barack Obama will visit Orlando tomorrow to mourn the victims of Sunday’s attack on a gay nightclub that left at least 49 people dead. In December 2012, the president visited another American community to honor the dead in another mass shooting: Newtown, Connecticut.

Twenty children and six adult staff members at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown were killed by Adam Lanza on Dec. 14, 2012. Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Nicole Hockley and Mark Barden, who each lost children in the Newtown attack.

In the aftermath of the Orlando shooting, questions remain about how Omar Mateen slipped through an FBI watch. As NPR’s Dina Temple-Raston tells Here & Now‘s Robin Young, a grand jury is meeting to decide whether Mateen’s wife should be charged for failing to alert authorities that her husband was planning an attack.

Hear more of our Orlando shooting coverage

Jobs in the so-called STEM fields – science, technology, engineering and math – are growing faster than any other sector of the U.S. economy, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. But the U.S. continues to lag other countries in STEM education. Furthermore, new hires in science and tech overwhelmingly tend to be white and Asian men.

There have never been a lot of scientists in Congress, but currently there’s just one: Bill Foster, a Democrat from Illinois, who has a Ph.D. in physics. As part of a week long series about science, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks to Foster about science policy, funding, and why it’s important for America to be the leader in scientific innovation.

View other stories in our series, “Science In America.” 

As America wrestles to understand the deadliest mass shooting in recent U.S. history, details of Omar Mateen’s life are beginning to emerge. NPR’s Hansi Lo Wang talks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the shooter’s possible presence on gay dating apps and in gay clubs and bars.

View all our coverage on the Orlando nightclub shooting.

The Anti-Defamation League has added the Echo symbol — a series of three brackets placed before and after a Jewish name — to its database of hate speech. The symbol has emerged on social media on sites used by white supremacist and other anti-Semitic groups who aim to identify and target Jews, particularly journalists, politicians and celebrities.

President Barack Obama, during remarks at the Treasury Department, pushed back against criticism for not using the term “radical Islamic terrorism” and touched on gun control and the fight against ISIS.

Obama did not use Trump’s, but said, “”Are we going to start treating all Muslim-Americans differently? Are we going to start subjecting them to special surveillance? Are we going to start discriminating them because of their faith? We’ve heard these suggestions during the course of this campaign.”

All this week, Here & Now is speaking with scientists about their research and looking at issues such as science funding, education and innovation.

In part one, Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with France Cordova, an astrophysicist and the director of the National Science Foundation.

Interview Highlights: France Cordova

On sustainability of funding to keep the US as a scientific leader:

The Supreme Court handed down several decisions today, though not in any of the three most prominent cases still pending this term. The three outstanding cases are all out of Texas: on abortion, affirmative action, and immigration.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Dahlia Lithwick, who covers the Supreme Court for Slate, about today’s decisions and what’s left at the court this term.

When you get home from work, you should be relieved and relaxed, right? Instead, a lot of people end up arguing with their partners. Experts say it’s because different people need different things after a stressful day on the job, some want to talk about what happened, others need quiet time.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Curt Nickisch of the Harvard Business Review about what the research tells us about the best way to navigate those differences.

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