The World

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  • Hosted by Marco Werman

The World is your world revealed. It's about the events, trends and personal tales that connect us around the globe. Marco Werman hosts an hour of surprising angles, unexpected insights and engaging voices to illuminate what's going on in the world, and why it matters to you.

Distributed by: PRI

Ways to Connect

At first glance, the tactics appear as different as the geography.

In Ukraine, the Kremlin has denied — repeatedly — the presence of Russian armed forces. The war is cast as an internal conflict between a fascist Ukrainian government in Kiev and Russian-speaking separatists in the country’s east. Yet the Kremlin sides with the separatists politically while tacitly endorsing incursions by patriotic Russian “volunteers” to aid the separatists militarily. Many of these “volunteers” were once members of the armed forces. Others, it appears, still are.

Sometime after midnight in mid-May of 2017, 27-year-old JeanCarlo Jimenez Joseph fashioned a noose from a bed sheet and hanged himself in his solitary confinement cell at the Stewart Detention Center, located in the pine woods of southwest Georgia. Stewart’s low-slung complex lies behind two tall chain-linked fences, each crowned with huge spirals of glinting barbed wire. Beginning in 2006, the facility began to house undocumented immigrants detained by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement.​

On Tuesday, US President Donald Trump fired Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, and said current CIA Director Mike Pompeo would replace him. Trump then tapped Gina Haspel the CIA's deputy director to take Pompeo's job. 

Related: 'It's like starting over': What Pompeo means for diplomacy

How a soldier gets ready for deployment

Mar 14, 2018

First Lt. Erica MacSwan was just 7 years old when 9/11 happened. Yet, she has vivid memories of it.

Her family lived in New Hampshire at the time. Her dad, who worked for IBM, commuted to New York City for work. On that morning, he was running late for a meeting.

"He didn't get far before a black blanket covered him," MacSwan recalls, "and he just crouched down, and then he couldn't see anything. The city went absolutely silent, which is obviously so unusual for New York City."

Nearly 2 million Muslims take part in the pilgrimage to Mecca each year.  

Egyptian journalist and author Mona Eltahawy first participated in the five-day pilgrimage when she was a teenager and something happened that still haunts her today — she was sexually abused.  

Following the momentum of the #MeToo campaign, Eltahawy set in motion #MosqueMeToo, to tell her story and to encourage other Muslim women to step forward and share their experiences of sexual abuse while on the Muslim pilgrimage.

One of the most visible ways that cultures mingle in America is through food. So it’s no wonder that when PRI's The World asked, as part of our Global Nation coverage, why Filipino cuisine hasn't spread like Thai or Chinese in this country, the reaction was strong.

A guide to Russian ‘demotivator’ memes

Mar 12, 2018

Long before Russia ever launched social media campaigns in the US, Kremlin-backed trolling was alive and well at home. In this online underworld of paid seeders, twitterati and trolls, “demotivators” — Russian internet picture memes — play a special bottom-feeder role.

In Russia, a ‘ghost empire’ rises

Mar 12, 2018

In July of 2016, I wrangled a rare invitation to the Baltic Factory, a legendary shipyard in Saint Petersburg, for the maiden voyage of the Arktika. 

This was no ordinary ship. The first of a series of next-generation Russian nuclear icebreakers, the Arktika was and is touted as the biggest and most powerful ship of its kind — a mammoth football field-sized vessel that could cut through ice almost 10 feet deep on ostensibly endless journeys through the most desolate areas of the globe. And while it’s doing that, Arktika is also securing Russia’s economic future. 

Yoo In-sik slides open the front door of his repair shop, and a man on a mobility scooter pulls in. Yoo grabs an air hose, he fills his tires and backs out onto the street of this neighborhood in northern Seoul.

Yoo’s office is filled with parts of motorized wheel chairs and other adaptive equipment for persons with disabilities. Resting against the wall is a pair of skis and next to those is a device he made himself called an outrigger — it has ski blades which attach to his legs and helps Yoo stay balanced whenever he hits the slopes.

My dad, Danilo, got a contract at White Memorial Hospital in Los Angeles, California just after my brother Chris was born. My two younger brothers and I didn't see him again for almost 10 years.

During the school year, we lived in a small, two-bedroom apartment in Quezon City in Metro Manila, sharing the space with my uncle, an accountant for an American company, and two aunts, a librarian and a nursing student.

In the summer, they shipped my brothers and I to my grandparents’ home in the rural province of Isabela.

Inside the student union at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP), members of the campus College Republicans club are holding their monthly meeting, brainstorming questions for a congressional candidate debate they are hosting on campus.

One student suggests a question on border security, “If not a wall, how do you suggest we secure our border?”

California is often called a “sanctuary” state, a place that is attempting to defy the Trump administration’s get-tough approach on immigration and protecting undocumented people in the state. But Jesús Ruiz sees things differently.

“There is a lot of chaos, a lot of confusion,” he said this week, following a recent burst of federal immigration operation throughout California.

Lyudmila Pavlichenko, history’s deadliest female sniper, is considered to be a Soviet propaganda myth by some, including some people in Russia. The divorced teenage mother from the tiny Ukrainian town of Bila Tserkva is credited with killing at least 309 Nazis — she simply sounds too good to be true.

Pavlichenko was certainly used in the Soviet propaganda effort to get the United States involved in the war effort in Europe in 1942. While on a tour of the States, she frequently surprised American reporters by not attempting to be traditionally feminine or smartly dressed.

For the first time, North Korea has sent athletes to compete in the Winter Paralympics.  


The North’s team received a warm welcome as they entered Pyeongchang’s Olympic stadium on Friday. Thousands of LEDs placed throughout the stands glowed red, blue and white to form the shape of the country’s flag — a display that if for any other occasion, would be illegal in South Korea. 

Related: Ice Warriors: USA sled hockey team prepares for the 2014 Paralympics

After sexual assault, this former aid worker found little help from UN

Mar 8, 2018

Editor's note: This piece's author, Amy Costello, is reporting on aid workers' experiences with sexual harassment and abuse. She would like to hear from you. Call us at 857-285-4157 and leave a confidential message. 

Shannon Mouillesseaux was violently assaulted a decade ago in Sri Lanka while working for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

The attack itself was deeply traumatic. But Mouillesseaux says the way she was treated by UNHCR in the aftermath was even more damaging.