The World

Airs Weekdays at 7 pm
  • Hosted by Marco Werman

The World is your world revealed. It's about the events, trends and personal tales that connect us around the globe. Marco Werman hosts an hour of surprising angles, unexpected insights and engaging voices to illuminate what's going on in the world, and why it matters to you.

Distributed by: PRI

Ways to Connect

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Courtesy of Major League Baseball

A Pittsburgh Pirates rookie named Gift Ngoepe has become the first African-born player to appear in a Major League Baseball game.

On Wednesday, the 27-year-old South African stepped up to the plate in a game against the Chicago Cubs and hit a single up the middle in his first at-bat.

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Courtesy of the Daum School

History class at the Daum School in Seoul looks pretty typical: Some students take notes intently, others take a nap. You can't tell that most of these students have risked their lives to be here. 

This is a high school for North Korean refugees in Seoul.

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Marie Arago/Reuters

The Oscar-winning director Jonathan Demme was one of the great artistic innocents. This doesn’t mean he was unsophisticated — far from it, just look at his work. But he was open to the world and thought the world had something to teach him; he was an eager and even a hungry learner.

Each week on The World, we feature a unique selection of music, and every week, we put together the highlights for you here. 

Reggae star Jah9 

Jamaican reggae artist Jah9 is a woman who embodies the title of a track on her latest CD, "Unafraid." Women have long been eclipsed on the reggae scene by men. But Jah9 is unafraid to be in that space.

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Courtesy <a href="http://www.armcomedy.com/category/english/">ArmComedy</a>

Narek Margaryan and Sergey Sargsyan want their fellow Armenians to know that it's OK to make a joke. It's not personal.

The two academics-turned-comedians are the creators, writers and co-anchors of ArmComedy, Armenia's first satirical news program — and yes, it's compared to The Daily Show, like, all the time. Sargsyan says the format took a while to find an audience in Armenia.

In slashing $32 million of funding to the United Nations Populations Fund, also known as the UNFPA, earlier this month, the Trump administration slung a decade-old nefarious charge: The agency supports the coercive abortion of Chinese female fetuses.

To many in China, this came as a surprise.

So we slash US foreign aid. But why?

Apr 28, 2017
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Joshua Roberts/Reuters

President Donald Trump's plan to make dramatic cuts in foreign aid and abolish an independent US Agency for International Development has few fans on Capitol Hill and powerful detractors at the Pentagon.

Still, the proposal, or some version of it, could become a reality. 

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Brian Snyder/Reuters

Texas State Rep. Gene Wu was visibly emotional on Wednesday as he spoke about a controversial immigration enforcement bill before the Texas House of Representatives.

"This topic is painful for me," said Wu, a Democrat who represents a district in Houston. "I am an immigrant. My parents are immigrants. I represent a district filled with immigrants."

He spoke about the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, which restricted the immigration of Chinese immigrants into the United States. And he called attention to the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II.

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Courtesy of NRK

The annual migration of reindeer across Norway is a spectacle of nature. The majestic animals are currently moving from their southern winter grazing grounds to greener spring pastures.

This year you can watch it happen in real time — all of it.

The Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK) is following a herd of almost 1,500 reindeer on its Slow TV channel. Tune in and you’ll see reindeer, reindeer, and more reindeer. 

 

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Marco Werman

When you’ve got a great car mechanic and he leaves the neighborhood, it almost feels like your doctor has moved. Guang Lin is that mechanic. And with his departure goes much more than a mechanic and friend I trust, which is no small thing itself.

In my own neighborhood of Cambridge — Cambridgeport — just on the other side of the Charles River from our studios, change has been pretty striking.

Astronauts are baffled by Trump's space travel plans

Apr 27, 2017
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Kevin Lamarque

American astronauts may be walking on Mars in the next eight years, or ideally the next four, if President Donald Trump has his way. But the new timetable has baffled experts in space travel. 

The surprise announcement — or rather instruction — took place this week during a live video conference between President Trump and veteran astronaut Peggy Whitson, who is currently aboard the International Space Station.

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Anita Elash

Amy Wright doesn’t use drugs anymore but when she did, she’d sometimes come to a narrow back alley in Toronto’s downtown core to shoot up heroin and morphine.

The alley is lined with enormous dumpsters and littered with trash. In Wright’s words, “It’s dark, it’s gray, it’s dim, it’s dirty. In the summer, you’ll really start to smell it because of the garbage, and you’ll smell the urine and, as you can see, there’s crap on the door.”

The March for Science, happening Saturday in Washington, DC, started as a reaction to the Trump administration’s attitudes toward science. But since it was dreamed up in late January, the movement has spread well beyond the Beltway.

As of Friday afternoon, organizers say there are more than 600 demonstrations planned, including roughly 200 outside of the United States.  

Science events — not all of them actual marches — are happening from the North Pole to Cape Town, from Bhutan to Greenland.

Maria Soria Castañeda grew up in North Carolina but was born in Mexico. She moved to the US with her family when she was 3. She’s also undocumented and, now, a junior at Swarthmore College, where she feels like a bit of a pioneer.

"We don’t really know what undocumented students they had before, but we were under the impression there weren't that many," says Castañeda. "Once we got here, we had to be the ones to sort of bring up what we would like to have here."

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Carlos Barria/Reuters

“It’s going to be the biggest tax cut in the history of the country!” That’s how US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin touted the Trump administration’s just-revealed tax plan. But huge cuts mean the government will need to make up the revenue somehow.

James Hines, an economics professor at the University of Michigan, says the United States might want to adopt a value-added tax or VAT.

“More than 170 countries have value-added taxes," Hines says. "Really, the United States is the only country that doesn’t.”

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