Currency of Water

Why Do We Use Drinking Water to Flush Our Toilets?

Jul 24, 2013
eutrophication&hypoxia/Flickr

The Johnson Foundation is taking a detailed look at how we can transform the nation's water infrastructure.

Val Klump is a senior scientist and Director of the Great Lakes WATER Institute at UW-Milwaukee. Rebecca Klaper is a Shaw Associate Scientist at the institute. They spoke with Mitch Teich as part of the Project Milwaukee series, "The Currency of Water."

Matt Parlow is a law professor at Marquette University Law School. Peter Rofes also teaches law there, and is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. They spoke with Lake Effect's Mitch Teich in June.

Israel's Water Plan

Dec 11, 2009

Eilon Adar is the director of the Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. He spoke with Stephanie Lecci from his home in Israel.

Water Efforts Criticized as Misguided

Dec 11, 2009

All week, we’ve been reporting on local efforts to position Milwaukee as the world’s hub for water technology and research. We visited companies already here, and reported on incentives to grow the industry, such as tax breaks. But there’s been limited criticism. Today, we delve into a report that calls the initiative financially risky and unlikely to succeed. WUWM’s Erin Toner has today’s installment of Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water.

Robert Glennon is the Morris K. Udall Professor of Law and Public Policy at the University of Arizona, and author of the book Unquenchable: America's Water Crisis and What to Do About It, published by Island Press. He spoke with Mitch Teich as part of our "Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water" series. Glennon was in Milwaukee this week to speak at a forum at Marquette University.

If you have an idea for conserving or cleaning water -- or even using it -- Milwaukee could one day be the place to develop your invention.

That's the dream. A coalition of community leaders is pushing the city to become a global hub for water research and technology.

But is it really possible for a region to make itself the headquarters of an industry? And is there competition? We seek answers to those questions, in today's installment of Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water. WUWM's Ann-Elise Henzl reports.

Richard Longworth is a senior fellow at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs and Distinguished Visiting Scholar at DePaul University. He spoke with Bonnie North as part of our series, Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water. You can also read the policy brief he authored calling for a Midwestern Marshall Plan.

Katherine Bliss is a senior fellow of the Global Health Policy Center at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, DC. She spoke about global water and sanitation issues this fall at the Institute of World Affairs at UW-Milwaukee. You can find her report on US leadership on drinking water and sanitation here.

Our series Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water continues this morning. We’re reporting on Milwaukee’s efforts to become a global hub for water research and technology. In the past few years, companies already in the water business here have been expanding. But as WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson reports, leaders are now working to kick the effort into high gear. The ultimate prize would be jobs and economic development, along with a good dose of prestige.

Rich Meeusen is the Chairman, President, and CEO of Milwaukee-based Badger Meter, a company that makes water meters. He's also Co-Chair of the M7 Water Council. He spoke with Lake Effect's Mitch Teich as part of our series, Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water.

Not too long ago, Milwaukee was thought of as a beer town. After all, the city was home to four large breweries, and they used plenty of water. So did other industries that took root here, such as tanneries. Milwaukee was perfect, sitting in around one-fifth of the world’s fresh water supply. All the related companies that developed are now prompting Milwaukee to forge ahead with a plan to become a global water hub. In this installment of our Project Milwaukee series, The Currency of Water, WUWM’s LaToya Dennis introduces us to some of the players. It’s a little after four on a weekday afternoon and second shifters at Badger Meter are busy.

Milwaukee-born writer and historian John Gurda is a regular Lake Effect contributor. He’s the author of nineteen books, including The Making of Milwaukee, and his latest, One People, Many Paths: A History of Jewish Milwaukee. Our interview on Milwaukee’s water history is part of our series, Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water.

Today, WUWM begins a week-long series called “Project Milwaukee: The Currency of Water.”

We will explore southeastern Wisconsin’s prospects of becoming an international hub for water technology.

WUWM environmental reporter Susan Bence starts with a look at the history of water use in Milwaukee and what’s contributing to the water hub dream.