Power Switch

Cynthia Hoffman

All week we’ve been airing a special series, Project Milwaukee: Power Switch, which has been exploring the promise and reality of green energy in Wisconsin.

Ann-Elise Henzl

A few years back, some people in Wisconsin banked big time on corn.

Homeowners have asked how they can reduce their carbon footprint. So we visited a few people who’ve taken a deep give into green living, and they shared their experiences.


Green building is picking up energy.

Sister Janet Weyker has more than a peripheral interest in renewable energy. The Racine Dominican nun runs a facility dedicated to “eco-justice”.

Michelle Maternowski

Wisconsin has been a leader in some aspects of the green energy movement.

courtesy Jamie Fletcher

Jamie Lynn Fletcher's voice is perhaps an unlikely addition to our Project Milwaukee series on clean energy.

As we’ve heard on our Project Milwaukee series this week, Wisconsin utilities are required to generate 10 percent of their electrical power by renewable sources – such biomass, wind – and solar.  That last source has been harnessed for decades.  But only recently have its costs come down enough to make wider-spread use more appealing. 

Milwaukee Home to Green Energy Producers

Jun 12, 2013

According to a national study, the solar and wind industries account for 12,000 jobs in Wisconsin, including hundreds in Milwaukee.

WEP photo

The Doomsday Clock measures the likelihood the world will end from nuclear war, global warming or biosecurity problems. So, it might be ironic that many climate scientists think a key to protecting the planet … is nuclear energy. It’s a dichotomy that is getting a hard look from at least one Wisconsin researcher.