Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin announced on Monday that it would keep its abortion clinic in Appleton closed. The reason for this, the organization says, is domestic terrorism. While some abortion opponents denounce threats of violence, they’re glad the clinic won’t reopen.

There are two abortion providers in the state - Planned Parenthood and Affiliated Medical Services, which only operates in Milwaukee.

Pete Marovich/Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court has told the State of Wisconsin that justices won't weigh in on Wisconsin's law, requiring doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals.

In a decision striking down key aspects of a Texas abortion law Monday, the Supreme Court cast doubt on similar laws in nearly two-dozen states.

The Supreme Court has overturned a Texas law requiring clinics that provide abortions to have surgical facilities and doctors to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital. The law was predicted to close many clinics and further reduce availability of abortion in Texas; the court has ruled the law violated the Constitution.

Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images

Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel met Tuesday's deadline for asking the U.S. Supreme Court to review a state abortion law, insisting the state should be able to enforce it.  

The law Wisconsin Republicans passed in 2013 requires abortion providers to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital.

Two federal courts have declared the law unconstitutional.

sudok1, fotolia

The rule requires abortion providers to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital, but a federal appeals court on Monday declared the law unconstitutional.

Supporters of the law claimed it would ensure the safety of women undergoing abortion in the event complications developed.

Opponents, including Planned Parenthood, challenged the law insisting it could force some clinics to close and thereby restrict women's abortion rights.

Monday's ruling by a three-judge panel upholds the decision a federal judge in Madison issued this spring.


It would become a felony in Wisconsin to sell or experiment with remains of fetuses aborted after 2014 under a bill an Assembly committee approved Wednesday morning. Researchers could still use cell lines and tissue obtained before this year in their quest to treat diseases.

Andrew Burton/Getty Images

(UPDATE: On Thursday, Sept. 24, the state Assembly approved the bill on a 60-35 vote, with all Republicans voting in favor, and all Democrats against.  The item now heads to the state Senate.)

Under a Republican bill, the state of Wisconsin would apply for federal Title X funding and direct it away from Planned Parenthood. Title X covers the cost of reproductive health care for low-income people, including contraception and treatment for sexually-transmitted diseases.

Wisconsin's State Capitol

Two Republican state lawmakers want to ban the sale of fetal tissue and create rules for its disposal.

The proposal comes on the heels of a controversial hidden camera video that a California group shot. It shows a conversation between a Planned Parenthood medical director in California and people who are, unbeknownst to her, abortion opponents. They pretend they’re interested in purchasing fetal specimens, and discuss prices.

The video outraged abortion opponents, such as Matt Sande, director of legislation for Pro-Life Wisconsin.


Wisconsin is one signature away from having a new abortion law – Gov. Walker’s signature.

In June, the state Senate advanced an abortion bill. On Thursday, the Assembly approved it. All 61 Republicans voted in favor; all 34 Democrats, against.

The measure would ban non-emergency abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. The bill does not provide exceptions for pregnancies resulting from sexual assault or incest. And, doctors who perform a non-emergency abortion after 20 weeks could get up to 3.5 years in prison.

Wisconsin's State Capitol
Ann Althouse, Flickr

Republican lawmakers believe a fetus can feel pain 20 weeks after fertilization. They say they base their point of view on the opinions of doctors they trust.  

So the legislators are considering prohibiting most abortions after 20 weeks.

Right now, Wisconsin bans most abortions after viability – about 24 weeks.

Democratic critics of the ban say scientific research concludes fetuses cannot feel pain until later in a pregnancy.

The rules would would ban abortions in Wisconsin after 20 weeks. If a medical emergency arises later, physicians must try to keep the fetus alive. Doctors would face criminal charges for violating the rules and could be sued both the woman and the father.

The Senate Committee on Health and Human Services approved the bill on a party line, 3-2 vote Thursday, with Republicans voting in favor and Democrats against. The item now moves to the full state Senate.

Wisconsin's State Capitol
Ann Althouse, Flickr

The spotlight at the state Capitol was not on the next state budget Tuesday, but rather on abortion.

Legislators listened to hours of testimony on a fast-tracked abortion bill. It would ban the procedure, in almost all cases, after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Any doctors who violate the law could be charged with a felony and sent to prison.

The bill would ban abortions in Wisconsin after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Proponents say, at that point, an unborn child may be capable of experiencing pain. Gov. Walker said Monday he would sign the ban into law, whether or not it includes exceptions for cases of rape or incest. The bill does not include exemptions.

When asked about the legislation during an appearance in Delavan, Walker called the proposed ban "rational and reasonable."

Republicans, Sen. Mary Lazich of New Berlin and Rep. Jesse Kremer of Kewaskum introduced their bill on Thursday, saying they want to prevent unborn children from feeling pain.

Under their proposal, the state would charge doctors with a felony for performing an abortion on a woman more than 20 weeks pregnant, if the case is not an emergency. Penalties could include a three-year prison term or a $10,000 fine.

Gov. Walker says he would sign the bill, if it reaches his desk.