AIDS

Eric Baillies / nikijohnson.com

It is World AIDS Day, and the devastation the disease has caused around the globe is sobering and grim. But there is cause for quite a lot of hope as education and new advancements in medicine help those infected live healthier lives.

aidswalkwis.org

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that more than 1.1 million people in this country over age 13 are living with an HIV infection, including as many as 207,000 who are living with it but have not yet been diagnosed.

The diagnosis of AIDS today is no longer necessarily the death sentence that it was when the disease emerged on a wide scale in the 1980s, but that does not mean it is not a personal and public health challenge.

Erin Toner

There is not much that politicians in Wisconsin have agreed on in the past few years – few issues enjoy bipartisan support. But a key exception has been the fight against AIDS.

John Paradowski

Dozens of Performers will take the stage Friday night at the Sharon Lynne Wilson Center for the Arts, in Brookfield.

ttfnrob, flickr

Earlier this week, we heard about the effectiveness of one Milwaukee-based organization in helping the quality of life for AIDS patients.  The strength of the work of the AIDS Resource Center of Wisconsin lies in its so-called “medical home” model, in which a variety of services, from medical care to pharmacy to mental health support, are provided under one roof. But reaching and helping people with HIV and AIDS can be especially challenging, when we’re talking about the homeless population.

The U.S. has not allowed gay men to donate blood since the 1980s - when HIV and AIDS cases grew, because gay men had a higher rate of infection than the general population.

Erin Toner

Wisconsin recently reported a sharp increase in new HIV infections. They rose nearly 20 percent from 2010 to 2011, with the most new cases in Milwaukee County. While the numbers are alarming and the population sometimes difficult to reach, those who connect early with the AIDS Resource Center of Wisconsin are in good hands. As WUWM’s Erin Toner reports, it has become a one-stop-shop for the many services patients may need and is considered a national model.

There’s been a significant increase in Milwaukee County in the number of young, African-American gay men infected with HIV. The state Division of Public Health puts the increase at 144 percent over eight years. On Monday, there was a daylong conference in town about ways of reducing infection rates among young, black men. WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson reports on efforts already underway to educate a demographic that can be difficult to reach.