art

Noel Vasquez / Stringer / Getty Images Entertainment

Rob Schrab wasn’t a Hollywood insider when he started his career in the industry, but the Emmy-winning and Oscar nominated writer and director quickly became a "go-to guy" for good work. Monster House, Parks and Recreation, and the Sarah Silverman Program are just a few of the projects he’s had a hand in shaping.

Siona Benjamin

Painter Siona Benjamin grew up in Bombay, India in a community of Jews that had been there for thousands of years. She was raised Jewish in a Hindu/Muslim India, attending a Catholic middle school and a Zoroastrian-Parsi high school, and she says India has been a very tolerant society for Jews. 

Since then, she has lived in the United States for over 30 years and has spent time in Israel. Because of her unique experiences, home and identity have become central themes of her work.

Joy Powers

If you happen to be walking by Milwaukee’s Oriental Theatre around midnight (the second Saturday of every month), you may see scantily-clad people wrapped around the lobby waiting with anticipation for a unique - yet somehow ubiquitous - experience.

A lot has happened in the last year and a half for singer-songwriter Tift Merritt.  A new baby, a new album, and a new creative outlet - textile design. 

Almost none of it has come simply or easily.

Photo: Thomas Griesel © The Museum of Modern Art

It's a daunting task to capture a life well-lived.

Shortly before her death from cancer in 2007 at age 66, New York painter Elizabeth Murray was one of only five women to have a retrospective exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art. She had “made it” much earlier than that, starting in the 1980s, but the exhibit was a crowning moment in a career that had involved some risks and a lot of pluck.

Photo courtesy of Sam Moore/MV Times

An exhibit at the Museum of Wisconsin Art showcases the clothes of six generations of an upper-middle class, Marshfield family -- The Roddis family.

Edyn Herbert

In these heightened political times, how you define yourself as an American is an important and fundamental question. Artists are always responding to difficult questions like this, and a new exhibit at the Walker’s Point Center for the Arts, Transplant Eyes, presents some answers.

Mitch Teich

For people who are dealing with trauma, mental illness, or other challenging life circumstances, sometimes traditional talk therapy isn't the best - or only - way to start the process of healing.

Art therapy and other creative therapies are on the rise as primary methods of care for people with mental illnesses. Five Milwaukee art therapists work out of a recently renovated space on South Kinnickinnic Avenue in Bay View.

Gallery 505 / Facebook

Even if you don’t know his name, you’ve probably seen the artwork of Peter Max. Max is one of the world’s most famous living pop artists. His bright, bold color palette has applied to depict everyone from rock stars to the Statue of Liberty. 

This weekend, Max will be at Gallery 505 in Whitefish Bay to kick off an exhibition of his collected works, which will feature some of his most iconic pieces.

Bonnie North

Wisconsin Avenue has become a temporary sculpture garden courtesy of galleries, artists, and curator Russell Bowman. 'Sculpture Milwaukee' is an installation of 22 pieces that line Wisconsin Avenue from Sixth Street all the way to the lakefront. After their time in the limelight, Bowman hopes the pieces will be sold to support annual 'Sculpture Milwaukee' projects.  

Bonnie North

Milwaukee’s Pfister Hotel sponsors a unique residency program for area artists. For 12 months, the selected artist sets up shop in a space off the lobby by the elevators on the first floor.

Sculpture Milwaukee

If you've been to downtown Milwaukee in the last week, you may have noticed curious shapes popping up along Wisconsin Ave. Workers are installing large sculptures, which will be on display for five months.

Local philanthropist Steve Marcus came up with the idea for the free, outdoor art gallery. He lobbied for it, for years. Marcus says people driving down the street are likely to take notice of the sculptures.

Milwaukee Museum Mile / Facebook

Visitors to Milwaukee's East Side might notice many painters outside over the next week. They're not commercial house painters; rather, they're artists.

Santos Zingdale / Courtesy of Racine Art Museum

When President Franklin Roosevelt debuted the Second New Deal plan in 1935, it was the peak of unemployment in the United States. One fourth of the country was out of work, and the president was tasked with creating new ways to aid his struggling nation.

The Second New Deal was even more ambitious and controversial than the first, and one of the standout initiatives was the creation of the Works Progress Administration, or WPA. The agency funded public works projects like building roads and bridges, but it also gave money to artists to create works for the public.

John Glembin

Normally, the temporary exhibition space houses in the Calatrava Wing of the Milwaukee Art Museum showcases artworks from well beyond Milwaukee’s borders. We’ve seen furniture from early 19th century Vienna, films from 1930s Germany and Impressionist paintings from mid to late 19th century France. But since March, the space has been home to a cornucopia of art that usually lives elsewhere in town.

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