art

Edyn Herbert

In these heightened political times, how you define yourself as an American is an important and fundamental question. Artists are always responding to difficult questions like this, and a new exhibit at the Walker’s Point Center for the Arts, Transplant Eyes, presents some answers.

Mitch Teich

For people who are dealing with trauma, mental illness, or other challenging life circumstances, sometimes traditional talk therapy isn't the best - or only - way to start the process of healing.

Art therapy and other creative therapies are on the rise as primary methods of care for people with mental illnesses. Five Milwaukee art therapists work out of a recently renovated space on South Kinnickinnic Avenue in Bay View.

Photo courtesy of Sam Moore/MV Times

A new exhibit at the Museum of Wisconsin Art showcases the clothes of six generations of an upper-middle class, Marshfield family -- The Roddis family.

Gallery 505 / Facebook

Even if you don’t know his name, you’ve probably seen the artwork of Peter Max. Max is one of the world’s most famous living pop artists. His bright, bold color palette has applied to depict everyone from rock stars to the Statue of Liberty. 

This weekend, Max will be at Gallery 505 in Whitefish Bay to kick off an exhibition of his collected works, which will feature some of his most iconic pieces.

Bonnie North

Wisconsin Avenue has become a temporary sculpture garden courtesy of galleries, artists, and curator Russell Bowman. 'Sculpture Milwaukee' is an installation of 22 pieces that line Wisconsin Avenue from Sixth Street all the way to the lakefront. After their time in the limelight, Bowman hopes the pieces will be sold to support annual 'Sculpture Milwaukee' projects.  

Bonnie North

Milwaukee’s Pfister Hotel sponsors a unique residency program for area artists. For 12 months, the selected artist sets up shop in a space off the lobby by the elevators on the first floor.

Sculpture Milwaukee

If you've been to downtown Milwaukee in the last week, you may have noticed curious shapes popping up along Wisconsin Ave. Workers are installing large sculptures, which will be on display for five months.

Local philanthropist Steve Marcus came up with the idea for the free, outdoor art gallery. He lobbied for it, for years. Marcus says people driving down the street are likely to take notice of the sculptures.

Milwaukee Museum Mile / Facebook

Visitors to Milwaukee's East Side might notice many painters outside over the next week. They're not commercial house painters; rather, they're artists.

Santos Zingdale / Courtesy of Racine Art Museum

When President Franklin Roosevelt debuted the Second New Deal plan in 1935, it was the peak of unemployment in the United States. One fourth of the country was out of work, and the president was tasked with creating new ways to aid his struggling nation.

The Second New Deal was even more ambitious and controversial than the first, and one of the standout initiatives was the creation of the Works Progress Administration, or WPA. The agency funded public works projects like building roads and bridges, but it also gave money to artists to create works for the public.

John Glembin

Normally, the temporary exhibition space houses in the Calatrava Wing of the Milwaukee Art Museum showcases artworks from well beyond Milwaukee’s borders. We’ve seen furniture from early 19th century Vienna, films from 1930s Germany and Impressionist paintings from mid to late 19th century France. But since March, the space has been home to a cornucopia of art that usually lives elsewhere in town.

Jordan Acker Anderson

Artists often teach others to paint, sculpt or draw. They might do it because they love it or because they need to supplement their income, or a combination of both. But as anyone who teaches knows - skill, dedication, and a significant time commitment are required to do it well. That often means artists don’t have enough time or energy to devote to creating their own work.

art by Emily Nolan

An exhibit of fabric tapestries currently on display at Jewish Museum Milwaukee amounts to a rare public opportunity to see art therapy in action.

Downtown Milwaukee Utility Boxes To Get A Makeover

Apr 3, 2017
Micaela Martin

If you've never noticed those gray utility boxes sitting on many downtown Milwaukee blocks, you will later this summer.  The local business improvement district has asked several local artists to submit designs for turning the boxes into three-dimensional works of art.

Beth Weirick, Milwaukee Downtown CEO, says as part of 2017 being "the year of Wisconsin Avenue," property owners suggested it do something creative with the boxes.

Kelly Bone / Flickr

Milwaukee’s Riverwest neighborhood is something of a mecca for people in creative fields.  And so it only makes sense that it would be the headquarters to an artists’ collective which strives to engage the community at-large in areas like films, non-traditional exhibits, workshops and other events.

Esther Nisenthal Krinitz / Art and Remembrance

The current refugee crisis is by no means the first the world has confronted.  Over the years, waves of refugees have come from places as varied as Bosnia, Somalia, Vietnam and, 70 years ago, World War II caused mass displacement in Eastern Europe.

Esther Nisenthal Krinitz was one of those refugees.  She escaped Poland as a teenager during the Nazi occupation, and eventually settled in the United States. It was years after she came to the U.S. that she took the story of her childhood and turned it into unique artwork made from fabric.

Pages