BadgerCare

Gov. Scott Walker wants Wisconsin to set new rules for childless adults taking part BadgerCare - the state's Medicaid program for people living at or below the poverty line. They would have to undergo screenings for drug use, pay $8 for every visit to an emergency room and take part in 80 hours of job training per month, among other new requirements.

According to the Legislative Fiscal Bureau, Wisconsin would have saved $206 M, if Gov. Walker had expanded Medicaid or BadgerCare coverage.

The Walker administration released a couple sets of numbers on Wednesday – about residents and health insurance.

People in Wisconsin without health insurance have less than a week to buy a plan on the new federal exchange in order for coverage to begin in January.

Lawmakers Spar Over Medicaid Reform Delay

Dec 2, 2013

The Legislature’s budget committee has voted to delay Medicaid changes in Wisconsin for three months.

Wisconsin lawmakers will convene in a special session Monday to consider putting state Medicaid reform on a three-month delay.

Gov. Walker will call legislators into special session Dec. 2, to give people losing BadgerCare three more months to enroll in the federal exchange.

Alex E. Proimos, Flickr

Gov. Walker is asking the Legislature for three more months. He wants to extend the state’s timeline for moving people off BadgerCare and into the federal government’s new private marketplace.

Gov. Walker's initial plan was to withdraw coverage from adults earning more than the poverty level and to refer them to the new federal exchange to buy private coverage.

Wisconsin plans to drop 77,000 people from BadgerCare on Dec. 31, but problems plague the new federal exchange, where they're supposed to go for health insurance.

President Obama has promised a “tech surge” to fix the problems with the online healthcare exchange. Time to enroll in the exchange is shrinking for thousands of Wisconsin adults who will lose their Medicaid coverage in January. Gov. Walker rejected federal money to expand Medicaid here, so in 2014, the state program will drop all adults living above the poverty level. Instead, his administration will refer them to the exchange. Claire Smith is a spokesperson for the state Department of Health Services.

The Wisconsin Dept. of Health Services will begin mailing letters Monday to 92,000 people it may drop from BadgerCare, because their income exceeds the poverty level.

State Medicaid Director Brett Davis says a letter will go out Sept. 23, to adult participants with incomes exceeding 100% of the federal poverty level.

With big health care changes looming on the state and federal levels, Milwaukee's free clinics are bracing for confusion and to be needed, like never before, even though supporters of each change say it's designed to serve the most vulnerable.

Photos.com

Wisconsin has asked for permission from the federal government to change its health care program for the poor – BadgerCare Plus. Wednesday, leaders will hold the first of three town hall meetings to explain the changes.

Pages