books

Macmillan Publishers

When we study classic literature in school, it’s generally the literature itself that we study and not what was happening in the lives of the authors who wrote the books.

However, a recent book drills down very deeply into what was going on in the lives of four major writers - Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, D.H. Lawrence, and E.M. Forster - for whom one year was immensely important.

Random House

 

In the great unknown, there was one constant: everything would be all right.” That’s the basic belief of the main character in Elizabeth Berg’s new novel, The Story of Arthur Truluv.

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Knopf Books for Young Readers

A few weeks ago, Lake Effect introduced you to Kathy Sullivan, a pioneer among women astronauts.  Sullivan flew on three Space Shuttle missions and was the first woman to walk in space. She was in town earlier this year to talk about her book for young readers, To the Stars! The First American Woman to Walk in Space.

AWST Press

Vida Cross teaches English literature and creative writing at Milwaukee Area Technical College. But the Chicago native practices what she teaches at MATC and has just published her first book of poetry.

feathercollector / Fotolia

Just over a quarter-century ago, Milwaukee native Steve Wallace started Omanhene Cocoa Bean Company.  It is not one of the huge players on the scene, nor is it a small boutique that makes truffles.  Its greater significance is that it makes chocolate bars in the African nation of Ghana, where the cocoa beans are grown.

For a long time, the “Montaigne” most mentioned on public radio has been former Morning Edition host Renee Montagne. But long before Renee Montagne started appearing on the airwaves, there was another Montaigne making waves. 

Michel de Montaigne was a 16th century French philosopher, whose collection Essais​ is credited as containing some of the most influential essays ever written, including Of Cannibals.

Rawf8 / Fotolia

Whether you talk about Pabst, Leinenkugel's or Schlitz (the beer that made Milwaukee famous), beer is central to Wisconsin heritage and identity. So, it is fitting that local, craft breweries are popping up across the state.

Wikimedia Commons

Today is the first Tuesday in November, which is typically the fall election day in this country. A year ago, Donald Trump was elected president, and a year from today, people will go to the polls in Wisconsin to vote in the gubernatorial, Congressional, Senate, and state legislative races.

Photo courtesy of Buck Blodgett

In the summer of 2013, 19-year-old Jessie Blodgett was a student at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s Arts Music Education Program. Like any young adult, her life plan was beginning to take shape and those who knew Jessie would say that she wanted to change the world through music. Jessie developed a keen social conscience early on, and it was her last and final cause - working to end male violence against women - that ended her life.

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Virginia Lee Burton wrote and illustrated picture books during the first half of the 20th century. From Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel to Katy and the Big Snow, her books are still staples of classroom and home libraries around the world today.

But it’s Burton herself who is at the center of a new picture book, by contemporary writer Sherry Rinker and illustrator John Rocco, called, Big Machines: The Story of Virginia Lee Burton.

In 1953, Denis Dubis was born at St. Luke’s Hospital in Milwaukee. After decades of struggling with his identity, Denis was reborn as Denise Chanterelle DuBois and is the author of the new memoir Self-Made Woman.

The book explores her life growing up in suburban Greendale, struggling with her identity, an unstable home life, and ultimately, drug and alcohol abuse.

Penguin Random House

Writer David Barclay Moore worked for eight years for the New York-based anti-poverty nonprofit, Harlem Children’s Zone. His work involved shooting short-form videos that told stories about the people the group was seeking to help. This experience helped him to understand, first hand, the challenges faced by many of the people living in concentrated pockets of public housing.

Could the answer to the tone of discourse in this country lie in a series of picture books for children? It might be putting a lot of pressure on a publication, but Brad Meltzer is up for the challenge.

Meltzer is the author of numerous thrillers for adult audiences and has hosted a couple of series on the History Channel, most recently Brad Meltzer’s Decoded.

Simon & Schuster

If the new middle-grade novel, The Explorer, feels like a product of another era, maybe that makes sense, because its author Katherine Rundell could be from another era as well.  Despite her fairly young age, Rundell has four novels under her belt, writes screenplays and plays, not to mention proficiency at walking a tightrope, has experience as a bush pilot, and is a fello

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