Books

HarperCollins Publishers / harpercollins.com

Author and Milwaukee native Cynthia Swanson's novel,  The Bookseller, was sparked by her own realization that the life she was living was not the one she had pictured for herself.

Swanson says, "One day I was at the gym... and I just had this moment for a second where I just thought, 'what in the world am I doing in this life? What happened to life I used to have?'"

Desert Agama / Flickr

When Ann O’Farrell first entered the workplace, she was a drama therapist, a theater set and costume designer and helped run a children’s theater in Ireland. 

Macmillan Publishers

Major changes happened in the world of baseball just after World War II, representing a unique period in the sport's history. Seasons were tenuous during the war. Hundreds of ballplayers left their teams to join the military and were replaced by players who were ineligible to fight, or whose better playing days were behind them.

stevenkotler.com

It’s probably safe to say that fans of science fiction are fans of technology. From Star Trek or Doctor Who to the novels of Isaac Azimov or Ernest Cline, technology plays a major role. Usually the capabilities described in those books or TV series are far more advanced than anything we currently use or could even imagine.

However, reality has been rapidly catching up with fiction over the past 20 years, and along with it have come ethical and moral questions only confronted in fictional worlds.

Author Uses Midlife Crisis To Change Her Life

Jul 22, 2015
Eileen Flanagan / eileenflanagan.com

Midlife is loosely defined in our culture as usually sometime in your 40s. It is often a time many of us take stock of who we have become and what goals we have reached or have yet to attain.

Many people react to this existential angst by making extravagant purchases, others decide to travel around the world.

Bold Strokes Books

When it comes to mystery novels, most books center around a murder and then solve the 'whodunit.' For local author Elizabeth Ridley's mystery/thriller book, the mystery in question is one of identity.

Spanning over the course of just 24 hours, Searching for Celia follows spy novelist Dayle Salveson’s investigation into the mysterious death of her best friend and former lover.

In many respects, Milwaukee attorney Robert Habush's career has been incredibly successful. 

Habush has represented clients in some of the most high-profile lawsuits in Wisconsin history - from the collapse of the crane that killed workers building Miller Park to suits against Big Tobacco.

Habush’s career – and his personal story - are the subject of a new biography, titled Courtroom Avenger: The Challenges and Triumphs of Robert Habush, by Milwaukee writer Kurt Chandler.

For some reason, love stories in books and movies almost always deal with people aged 16 to 34 years old. The young and the beautiful. That 35 and up group is usually there for comedic relief.

This is not the case for writer Emma Hooper's new book. She wrote a story to challenge that stigma.

"We don't stop having desires, dreams or motivations once we turn thirty five. We don't have everything figured out either," Hooper says.

photo courtesy Cathleen Burnham

Kids and animals make for a good mix. Whether you are a parent who thwarts the constant question of "can we get a puppy?" or you see the fascination on children's faces when you go to the zoo, it's obvious that kids have and seek a connection with all kinds of animals.

"I think we're born with this love of animals," says author Cathleen Burnham. "For some reason, whether it's because we live kind of pushing nature away from us, we lose contact with that."

Michael Perry

    

Michael Perry has been known  for his non-fiction work about his life in rural Western Wisconsin. He has accumulated a mass of fans around the world drawn to stories touching on topics from raising poultry to parenting.

After writing his first children's book, Perry is making his first attempt at a novel geared towards adults with his latest book, The Jesus Cow.

The corruption in Illinois politics is often seen as such a farce that if you pitched an Illinois political scandal as the plot for a book, no one would buy it.

But Illinois politics have inspired plenty of books and movies – and probably no one has done it more convincingly in recent times than mystery writer Michael Harvey.

The name Svetlana Alliluyeva should ring a bell to those who know their 1960's history.

She was probably the most famous defector to the United States from the Soviet Union. She was especially famous because she was the daughter of Joseph Stalin, the hard-line Soviet Leader from 1924 to 1953. 

Boswell Books

For those wanting to learn more about our planet and those surrounding us, the Adler Planetarium in Chicago has been a go-to spot. The Manfred Olson Planetarium at UW-Milwaukee is a great place to go when it’s not dark enough to see the night sky, or if you’d like to learn more about what you’re seeing.

But it’s not the only planetarium in Wisconsin.  In the tiny town of Monico there’s a unique planetarium created by a unique man. It’s the Kovac Planetarium and it is the creation of  Frank Kovac, Junior.

teakrulos.com

Milwaukee writer Tea Krulos isn’t holding any ordinary launch event for his new book.  Instead, he’s holding a conference - and it’s definitely not any ordinary conference.

Joe Parks

When it comes to intelligent animals, there are a handful that get a lot of attention.

Chimpanzees and other primates are thought to do a lot of things like human beings.  Dogs are considered man's best friend, capable of doing a multitude of jobs.  And in the sea, dolphins and whales are thought of as having keen intelligence.  When you think of intelligent animals, you probably don’t think of the octopus. 

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