books

Bold Strokes Books

When it comes to mystery novels, most books center around a murder and then solve the 'whodunit.' For local author Elizabeth Ridley's mystery/thriller book, the mystery in question is one of identity.

Spanning over the course of just 24 hours, Searching for Celia follows spy novelist Dayle Salveson’s investigation into the mysterious death of her best friend and former lover.

Loving Lardo Facebook page.

After spending 17 years living in Italy, lardo (Italian for lard) was the only thing, food or otherwise, that Wendy Olsen did not fall in love with. She recently published her first book, titled Loving Lardo, chronicling her experience in the country she loves.

In many respects, Milwaukee attorney Robert Habush's career has been incredibly successful. 

Habush has represented clients in some of the most high-profile lawsuits in Wisconsin history - from the collapse of the crane that killed workers building Miller Park to suits against Big Tobacco.

Habush’s career – and his personal story - are the subject of a new biography, titled Courtroom Avenger: The Challenges and Triumphs of Robert Habush, by Milwaukee writer Kurt Chandler.

For some reason, love stories in books and movies almost always deal with people aged 16 to 34 years old. The young and the beautiful. That 35 and up group is usually there for comedic relief.

This is not the case for writer Emma Hooper's new book. She wrote a story to challenge that stigma.

"We don't stop having desires, dreams or motivations once we turn thirty five. We don't have everything figured out either," Hooper says.

photo courtesy Cathleen Burnham

Kids and animals make for a good mix. Whether you are a parent who thwarts the constant question of "can we get a puppy?" or you see the fascination on children's faces when you go to the zoo, it's obvious that kids have and seek a connection with all kinds of animals.

"I think we're born with this love of animals," says author Cathleen Burnham. "For some reason, whether it's because we live kind of pushing nature away from us, we lose contact with that."

Michael Perry

    

Michael Perry has been known  for his non-fiction work about his life in rural Western Wisconsin. He has accumulated a mass of fans around the world drawn to stories touching on topics from raising poultry to parenting.

After writing his first children's book, Perry is making his first attempt at a novel geared towards adults with his latest book, The Jesus Cow.

The corruption in Illinois politics is often seen as such a farce that if you pitched an Illinois political scandal as the plot for a book, no one would buy it.

But Illinois politics have inspired plenty of books and movies – and probably no one has done it more convincingly in recent times than mystery writer Michael Harvey.

The name Svetlana Alliluyeva should ring a bell to those who know their 1960's history.

She was probably the most famous defector to the United States from the Soviet Union. She was especially famous because she was the daughter of Joseph Stalin, the hard-line Soviet Leader from 1924 to 1953. 

Boswell Books

For those wanting to learn more about our planet and those surrounding us, the Adler Planetarium in Chicago has been a go-to spot. The Manfred Olson Planetarium at UW-Milwaukee is a great place to go when it’s not dark enough to see the night sky, or if you’d like to learn more about what you’re seeing.

But it’s not the only planetarium in Wisconsin.  In the tiny town of Monico there’s a unique planetarium created by a unique man. It’s the Kovac Planetarium and it is the creation of  Frank Kovac, Junior.

teakrulos.com

Milwaukee writer Tea Krulos isn’t holding any ordinary launch event for his new book.  Instead, he’s holding a conference - and it’s definitely not any ordinary conference.

Joe Parks

When it comes to intelligent animals, there are a handful that get a lot of attention.

Chimpanzees and other primates are thought to do a lot of things like human beings.  Dogs are considered man's best friend, capable of doing a multitude of jobs.  And in the sea, dolphins and whales are thought of as having keen intelligence.  When you think of intelligent animals, you probably don’t think of the octopus. 

Publishing's big week is almost over. The industry's annual convention, BookExpo America, ends Friday in New York, and on Saturday the publishing world opens its doors to the public with BookCon, where avid readers will get the chance to mix and mingle with their favorite authors.

If the book is dead, nobody bothered to tell the folks at Capitol Hill Books in Washington, D.C. Books of every size, shape and genre occupy each square inch of the converted row house — including the bathroom — all arranged in an order discernible only to the mind of Jim Toole, the store's endearingly grouchy owner.

eloisajames.com

You could look at Mary Bly in two ways.

An academic with a bachelor’s degree from Harvard, a master’s from Oxford and a Ph. D from Yale. She is a Shakespearean scholar who is a tenured professor at Fordham University.

Many folks aren't inclined to choose horror as their favorite film genre, and fewer will actually admit it.

When we think of movies in the theaters now, the likes of romance, action and comedy come to the forefront. But the horror genre should not be pushed to the side. It is a billion dollar industry.

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