budget

Rachel Morello

Imagine someone hands you a bonus -- a few hundred extra dollars. How would you spend the money? That’s a question facing Wisconsin school districts.

Walker
WHITNEY CURTIS/GETTY IMAGES

During his budget address Wednesday, Governor Walker said his budget prioritizes student success and accountable government, and rewards work. The governor also tucked nearly $600 million in tax cuts over the next two years into his plan. 

READ: Gov. Walker's 2017-19 Proposed Budget

Ann Althouse, flickr

There’s disagreement among state Republicans over some items that Gov. Walker will likely propose in his budget Wednesday. Gov. Walker has indicated that he will call for more funding for K-12 schools, particularly in rural areas. 

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos is pleased. He says many public schools have seen declining enrollment and it affects the amount of money the state sends them.

Micaela Martin

Milwaukee Democrats have unveiled their wish list for the next state budget as Gov. Walker prepares to deliver his Wednesday. The governor is expected to propose a fix for the transportation deficit and allocate more money for schools. Democrats say they hope to work with Republicans on some issues.

Yet, Dems are not happy with much of what Walker has already revealed about his proposed budget. Number one on Milwaukee Democrats’ list of priorities for the next state budget: jobs.

LaToya Dennis

During a stop in Wauwatosa Wednesday, Governor Walker revealed more about his upcoming two-year budget proposal. He said he's ready to put forth money to help keep families intact, while revamping the welfare system.

Walker said he wants to adjust the Earned Income Tax Credit - a program he trimmed in 2011. The governor told the audience at the Wauwatosa Rotary Club that he plans to eliminate the EITC's marriage penalty.

SCOTT OLSON/GETTY IMAGES

Gov. Scott Walker revealed part of his upcoming budget Wednesday morning, as he announced increased funding for rural schools. 

Wisconsin Department of Transportation

If there’s one state issue that riles a lot of Wisconsin leaders these days, it’s transportation. Wisconsin could face a $1 billion shortfall in its next transportation budget. Should lawmakers scale back projects or find more money?

An Assembly committee held the first hearing Tuesday on the Department of Transportation's spending plan. Legislators from both political parties questioned the administration’s priorities.

iQoncept, fotolia

Wisconsin turned a deeper shade of red, following last week's elections for the Legislature. Republicans gained a seat in the Assembly and picked up another vote in the Senate.

One big task facing state lawmakers in 2017 is to pass a new two-year state budget, and that includes addressing Wisconsin's $1 billion deficit in the transportation fund.

The Milwaukee Common Council meets Friday to adopt a budget for the city for 2017. Among the issues that top the list - public safety and lead abatement. Mayor Tom Barrett’s proposal boosts police spending, but does not include hiring more officers. The plan also contains additional money to address lead issues both in paint and pipes.

Susan Bence

Last week, Governor Walker floated his proposal for the future of the state’s transportation budget. The plan includes a two-year delay on the Zoo Interchange work and no additional taxes. It’s just the beginning to the biennial budget cycle.

MILWAUKEE POLICE/RIEMANN

Aldermen tried to use the city budget Tuesday to get their arms around this year's spike in violent crime.

Several put forth measures to add police officers. Ald. Bob Donovan submitted one proposal. He made the case for a bigger police force, pointing out that crime surged from 2011 to 2014.

"Milwaukee has seen a 49 percent increase in violent crime, a 19 percent increase in robberies, a 78 percent increase in aggravated assaults," Donovan said.

And 2015 has been a tough year, with a high homicide rate and other crimes.

frankieleon / Flickr

The budgeting process has begun for the coming fiscal year for both the City of Milwaukee and Milwaukee County.  The Common Council and Board of Supervisors, respectively, will consider the budgets proposed by the Mayor and the County Executive.

Ian Freimuth / Flickr

The past few years have been challenging budget times for municipalities around Wisconsin – and, it should be said, many places around the country.

But as Milwaukee’s city and county leaders consider proposed budgets from the mayor, and county executive, respectively, an independent analysis gives those budgets largely positive reviews. 

The analysis comes from the non-partisan Milwaukee-based Public Policy Forum, and forum president Rob Henken spoke with Lake Effect's Mitch Teich about them.

Chris Abele

Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele's proposed 2015 budget holds the line on taxes, but at a cost for some employees.

bcdixit

Wisconsin’s candidates for governor are trading barbs, over new budget projections.

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