budget

Wisconsin Department of Transportation

If there’s one state issue that riles a lot of Wisconsin leaders these days, it’s transportation. Wisconsin could face a $1 billion shortfall in its next transportation budget. Should lawmakers scale back projects or find more money?

An Assembly committee held the first hearing Tuesday on the Department of Transportation's spending plan. Legislators from both political parties questioned the administration’s priorities.

iQoncept, fotolia

Wisconsin turned a deeper shade of red, following last week's elections for the Legislature. Republicans gained a seat in the Assembly and picked up another vote in the Senate.

One big task facing state lawmakers in 2017 is to pass a new two-year state budget, and that includes addressing Wisconsin's $1 billion deficit in the transportation fund.

The Milwaukee Common Council meets Friday to adopt a budget for the city for 2017. Among the issues that top the list - public safety and lead abatement. Mayor Tom Barrett’s proposal boosts police spending, but does not include hiring more officers. The plan also contains additional money to address lead issues both in paint and pipes.

Susan Bence

Last week, Governor Walker floated his proposal for the future of the state’s transportation budget. The plan includes a two-year delay on the Zoo Interchange work and no additional taxes. It’s just the beginning to the biennial budget cycle.

MILWAUKEE POLICE/RIEMANN

Aldermen tried to use the city budget Tuesday to get their arms around this year's spike in violent crime.

Several put forth measures to add police officers. Ald. Bob Donovan submitted one proposal. He made the case for a bigger police force, pointing out that crime surged from 2011 to 2014.

"Milwaukee has seen a 49 percent increase in violent crime, a 19 percent increase in robberies, a 78 percent increase in aggravated assaults," Donovan said.

And 2015 has been a tough year, with a high homicide rate and other crimes.

frankieleon / Flickr

The budgeting process has begun for the coming fiscal year for both the City of Milwaukee and Milwaukee County.  The Common Council and Board of Supervisors, respectively, will consider the budgets proposed by the Mayor and the County Executive.

Ian Freimuth / Flickr

The past few years have been challenging budget times for municipalities around Wisconsin – and, it should be said, many places around the country.

But as Milwaukee’s city and county leaders consider proposed budgets from the mayor, and county executive, respectively, an independent analysis gives those budgets largely positive reviews. 

The analysis comes from the non-partisan Milwaukee-based Public Policy Forum, and forum president Rob Henken spoke with Lake Effect's Mitch Teich about them.

Chris Abele

Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele's proposed 2015 budget holds the line on taxes, but at a cost for some employees.

bcdixit

Wisconsin’s candidates for governor are trading barbs, over new budget projections.

Flickr.com/pinchof

The non-partisan Legislative Fiscal Bureau released new figures Monday, regarding a projected deficit in Wisconsin’s structural budget.

Casey Eisenreich, Flickr

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett on Tuesday will outline the budget planning process for 2015 while also taking suggestions from residents.

Philip Taylor PT, Flickr

Mayor Tom Barrett and County Executive Chris Abele have both issued their proposed budgets for the coming fiscal year, and debate on those documents is underway.

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett introduced a budget Tuesday that would modestly raises taxes. The typical homeowner would pay about $18 more in 2014.

Waukesha County Executive Dan Vrakas' five year capital improvment plan includes major upgrades to the courthouse as well as heavily traveled roadways.

Milwaukee Mayor's Budget Adds 100 Police Officers

Aug 20, 2013

Milwaukee’s recent violent crime wave is on the mayor’s mind as he plans the city budget for 2014.

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