civil rights

Eric Draper / Wikimedia

Dr. Bernice King was just 5-years-old when her father, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., was assassinated. A lot changed for her that day, but much more would change in the following years. By the time she was 11-years-old, King had lost her father, her grandmother, and her uncle - a surrogate father who shaped her early childhood. 

In a conversation on stage at the Pabst Theatre, presented by the Jewish Community Center Milwaukee and the Milwaukee Urban League, King talked about her father’s legacy, her work, and what life was like after that harrowing day in 1968.

American Jewish Historical Society, New York, NY and Boston, MA

More than 50 years removed from the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s, a new Milwaukee exhibit is shining a light on the collaborative efforts of two groups in the struggle.

The Jewish Museum Milwaukee’s exhibit Allied in the Fight: Jews, Blacks and the Struggle for Civil Rights examines the relationship between Jewish and African-American people - both nationally and in Milwaukee itself.

Courtesy of Mark Speltz

There are many images associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement: crowds of people holding signs, policemen attacking children with dogs and fire hoses, or students sitting at lunch counters with jeering crowds behind them.

But nearly all of the photos in popular culture depict incidents that happened in southern states. For many Americans these images form our view of that time period, and frame the fight for civil rights as a largely southern issue.

topshelfcomix.com

March, Book One tells the story of John Lewis' childhood in the segregated south, his formative meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., and the organization of the Nashville Student Movement, and its fight to integrate lunch counters.

Representative John Lewis serves Georgia's 5th congressional district. He’s the co-author, along with staffer Andrew Aydin, of the comic book March, Book One. Lewis and Aydin were at Marquette, where Lewis was awarded an honorary degree.

Mark Frohna

The Civil Rights era was a defining time in American history, and the reverberations are still being felt today.

A contemporary musical, Violet, explores those early days of the modern civil rights era through the eyes of a young woman – Violet – traveling through 1964 America.

In the late nineteenth century, civil rights pioneers Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass lived near each other in Rochester, NY. They were friends and often supported each other as they fought for the rights of women and African Americans in America.

Andrew Burton, Getty Images

We have discussed some of the myriad causes of racial discrimination.  And some have spoken about what they see as racially discriminatory practices at several levels.  While some lump that concept in under the umbrella term, “racism,” our first guest this morning would urge you to understand the distinction between the two concepts.

Doctor Imani Perry is professor at Princeton University’s Center for African-American Studies – she was one of Marquette University’s three Metcalfe Chairs this semester and talked about the persistence of racial inequality last week in Milwaukee.

National Archives and Records Administration, Wikimedia Commons

Service is growing part of the King Day observance.