Congresswoman Gwen Moore

Marge Pitrof

The Obama administration's Affordable Care Act is not perfect, but it has enabled the United States to take a major step forward in making health insurance available to all Americans, multiple speakers told a crowd Sunday morning, on Milwaukee's south side.

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House and Senate conferees are in the process of working on a revised federal budget package that will eventually come before the respective houses of Congress for a vote.

As is often the case, Republicans are seeking cuts in domestic spending while some increases in spending on defense programs. Democrats, meanwhile, are hoping to preserve a variety of social service programs.

Analysts say an uncommon atmosphere of compromise is in the background as the work goes on.  But will that spirit enter the budget talks?

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Reaction is continuing to come in around the community in the wake of Monday's decision in the Dontre Hamilton case.

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Caucus members, including WI Rep. Gwen Moore, want to challenge Rep. Paul Ryan for questioning the work ethic of men living in inner cities and for his plan scaling back anti-poverty programs.

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Though Congress has managed to break Washington gridlock to pass an Omnibus spending bill, Democratic Congresswoman Gwen Moore of Milwaukee says most Republicans "would like to carry us back to a point in time when government does practically nothing."

Wisconsin Congresswoman Gwen Moore says she’s relieved the House and Senate are pulling the country back from the financial cliff.

Leaders on Wednesday agreed to reopen the government at least until mid-January and raise borrowing into February. Moore says the political stalemate has been frustrating, yet she thought it would end the way it did.