Education

Rachel Morello

If you think about it, an election is sort of like a job interview: candidates present their ideas, hoping the public will hire them.

The three men campaigning to be Wisconsin’s superintendent are nearing the end of the “first round interview,” ahead of next week’s primary.

But rather than surveying voters, we assembled a “hiring committee” – of students!

Stasique / Fotolia

Governor Walker’s proposed biennial budget calls for increases in funding for K-12 schools and the University of Wisconsin System.

But with unemployment and underemployment among the social issues that affected voter behavior in last fall’s elections, some are taking a closer look at how the education system is preparing students for the workforce. A key part of that equation is so-called Career and Technical Education, or CTE.

Today the Senate confirmed Betsy DeVos as President Trump's education secretary, 51-50.

SCOTT OLSON/GETTY IMAGES

Gov. Scott Walker revealed part of his upcoming budget Wednesday morning, as he announced increased funding for rural schools. 

Steven Lilley/Flickr

One of the big unknowns under the new presidential administration is what will happen with education. What we do know is that both Donald Trump and his pick for education secretary, Betsy DeVos, support school vouchers.

Milwaukee boasts the longest-running voucher program in the country. Could that make the city’s initiative a template for the country over the next four years?

Pewaukee Insight Official Website

Business casual. Handshakes. PowerPoint presentations, pitches and customer surveys.

You would think you’d just walked into the boardroom in a downtown Milwaukee business. But, in fact, you’re among a group of upperclassmen from Pewaukee High School.

Pewaukee juniors and seniors have the opportunity to sign up for a capstone class called “Insight.” The program is basically a real-world equivalent of the television show “Shark Tank” – students create, design and pitch business startups over the course of semester.

If you got 13 percent back on your investments every year, you'd be pretty happy, right? Remember, the S&P 500, historically, has averaged about 7 percent when adjusted for inflation.

What if the investment is in children, and the return on investment not only makes economic sense but results in richer, fuller, healthier lives for the entire family?

ADELIE FREYJA ANNABEL, FLICKR

Updated December 8, 2:08 p.m.:

The UW Board of Regents voted Thursday to increase employee salaries, as well as bump up tuition for out-of-state students.

Both decisions come as deep state budget cuts continue to impact public universities across Wisconsin.

The move to increase tuition would add $2,000 to bills for out-of-state students. It would also affect some graduate students in programs like medicine and business.

The Edible Schoolyard Project, facebook

A trio of luminaries of the local, accessible for all, food movement are assembling in Milwaukee Friday evening as part of Growing Power’s Urban and Small Farms Conference.

Its founder Will Allen will take the stage with Ron Finley, who leads a urban garden and education movement in Los Angeles.

Rachel Morello

This year, for the first time, a Milwaukee charter school is trying a new system of teaching and learning created by Facebook engineers.

The Silicon Valley-based company worked with Summit Public Schools in California to create Summit Learning, a computer-based model that puts more of the responsibility on students to take charge of their learning.

How A Happy School Can Help Students Succeed

Oct 31, 2016

Every day at Weiner Elementary School starts with a dance party, usually to Best Day Of My Life by American Authors — and that's before the 7:50 a.m. bell even rings.

Then comes the morning assembly, where all 121 students and the staff gather for 20 minutes in the cafeteria of the school in Weiner, Ark. They sing songs and learn about an artist, a musician and an international city of the week.

PAVE/Colin Deval

Milwaukee professionals looking to give back to their communities can now receive training as a school board member, thanks to a new citywide program.

Most public school districts are governed by elected boards. But many private, independent schools must piece together their own boards.

First, a story:

Late one night, a man searches for something in a parking lot. On his hands and knees, he crawls around a bright circle of light created by a streetlamp overhead.

A woman passes, stops, takes in the scene.

"What are you looking for? Can I help?"

"My car keys. Any chance you've seen them?"

"You dropped them right around here?"

"Oh, no. I dropped them way over there," he says, gesturing vaguely to some faraway spot on the other side of the lot.

"Then why are you looking here?"

The man pauses to consider the question.

The hurdles Native American teenagers face in and out of school are daunting. College Horizons, a small organization based in New Mexico, has proven they're not insurmountable.

Every year, the group sponsors week-long retreats on college campuses for teenagers from some of the more than 500 federally-recognized tribes in the U.S.

One of those retreats was at Lawrence University in Appleton, Wis., where 85 students gathered along with dozens of admissions officers from some of the nation's most selective universities.

We all hold our fair share of stress – work, family matters, keeping a social calendar.

For high school students, that list also includes homework, thinking about college and a host of other “teenage” worries.

One all-girls high school in Milwaukee is trying to give its students the tools to manage stress – and take responsibility for their own well-being.

This isn’t your average gym class. In fact, it’s not gym class at all.

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