election

BBC World Service / Flickr

The reverberations from the election of Donald Trump to the presidency are continuing to echo around Wisconsin, the country, and the world.  In fact, it seems people in other countries are having almost as many conversations about the historic 2016 election as in the United States. 

Claire Bolderson is a former BBC correspondent and now independent journalist who has covered numerous US elections and other momentous ballot issues, such as the Brexit vote earlier this year.  From London, she added her take on the election.

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

During the early hours of Election Day, the local immigrant advocacy group spread the word. It planned to celebrate historic Latino voter turnout.

But rather than celebratory, it was somber. While Latino voters in Wisconsin backed Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump by a margin of 87 to 10 percent, Trump emerged with a stunning victory.

As the November election approached, Valeria Ruiz served as campaign coordinator for Voces de la Frontera in Racine, Wisconsin.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

One of the many surprises of Tuesday's elections was the fact that Donald Trump won Wisconsin's electoral votes. The last Republican to do so was Ronald Reagan, more than 30 years ago.

Christopher Murray, of the Les Aspin Center for Government in Washington, D.C. has been crunching the numbers to find out why the state turned red.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton finds herself on the wrong end of an electoral split, moving ahead in the popular vote but losing to President-elect Donald Trump in the Electoral College, according to election results that are still being finalized.

As of midday Thursday ET, Clinton had amassed 59,938,290 votes nationally, to Trump's 59,704,886 — a margin of 233,404 that puts Clinton on track to become the fifth U.S. presidential candidate to win the popular vote but lose the election.

When Donald Trump came down the escalator in June of 2015 in the tower he named for himself in Manhattan, few of us who do politics for a living took his off-the-cuff announcement for president seriously.

But the past 17 months have been a lesson to all of us who flattered ourselves — as campaign pros, polling pros and media pros — that we knew more about politics than he did.

What have we learned? That Trump was being taken very seriously, indeed, by the people who ultimately mattered: voters.

President-elect Donald Trump has promised over and over in recent months that he will repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also called Obamacare, when he reaches the White House.

"Obamacare is a disaster. You know it. We all know it," Trump said at a debate last month. "We have to repeal it and replace it with something absolutely much less expensive."

Donald Trump's presidential campaign, like the business career that preceded it, was unpredictable, undisciplined and unreliable. Despite those qualities — or perhaps, in part, because of them — it was also successful.

So what should we expect from President-elect Trump, mindful that his path to the White House has defied expectations at every turn?

Donald Trump has been elected the 45th president of the United States, the capstone of a tumultuous and divisive campaign that won over white voters with the promise to "Make America Great Again."

Trump crossed the 270 electoral vote threshold at 2:31 a.m. ET with a victory in Wisconsin, according to Associated Press projections.

Bonnie Petrie

Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson became the first state Republican to win election to the U.S. Senate during a presidential year, since 1980. On Tuesday, he again defeated former Democrat Senator Russ Feingold in a rematch of Wisconsin's 2010 Senate race. Johnson's win helped Republicans remain in control of the Senate.

The incumbent argued that Feingold did not deserve to be sent back to Washington. Johnson told the Associated Press that he won Tuesday's election because, "I told the truth... I think the good folks of Wisconsin recognized that."

For the latest electoral count in the race for president, visit NPR's live blog.

As the results come in, projected winners of Wisconsin's Tuesday, November 8, 2016 general election will be marked in bold.

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES
Donald J. Trump (R)
Hillary Clinton (D)
Gary Johnson (L)
Jill Stein (Green)

Mitch Teich

People have been inundated with election coverage for months now, but it’s not just Americans who have been riveted to this historic campaign season. 

Many international journalists are in the United States both to cover the election and to learn more about federal elections in this country. As many casual observers have noticed, this has been an unusually contentious election cycle for the U.S. For some, the dirty politics at play in this election has reminded them of elections in their own countries. 

NPR Live Blog: Election Updates & Results

Nov 8, 2016
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

As results come in across the country, NPR reporters will be updating this breaking news blog in real time. 

The NPR Politics team, along with member station reporters, will be providing live updates in the form of photo, video, commentary and analysis for both national and local contested races.

This includes NPR’s Tamara Keith who will be covering the Clinton/Kaine election night event and NPR’s Sarah McCammon at the Trump/Pence event.

Ann-Elise Henzl

The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe has an election observation mission, which sends poll watchers to election sites around the globe. The monitors take notes on goings-on at polling places and report what they see.

Christa Mueller of Germany is among the observers sent to the United States for this fall's elections. She's part of a team, which has kept an eye on election-related activities in the Midwest in the weeks leading up to Election Day.

With all the hype surrounding Tuesday's presidential election, some voters may be tempted to take a photo at the polling place to remember the occasion. For instance, a picture of their completed ballot, or perhaps a selfie with their completed ballot.

But Wisconsin has a law that says you cannot show your completed ballot to another person. So taking a selfie at the polling site is problematic, according to Reid Magney of the Wisconsin Elections Commission. He says the issue isn't so much the photo itself, but rather what people could do with it.

WUWM Live Blog: Wisconsin Election Updates

Nov 7, 2016
Darren Hauck/Getty Images

WUWM will be updating this post throughout the day, as reporters visit polling places across the city and talk with voters. 

You can help WUWM and Electionland track voting problems by texting ELECTIONLAND to 69866.

This evening, WUWM's LaToya Dennis will be at Paul Ryan's party in Janesville, Marti Mikkelson will be in Middleton at Russ Feingold's and Bonnie Petrie will be in Oshkosh with Ron Johnson.

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