election

Updated at 5:55 p.m. ET

The Wisconsin Elections Commission announced Friday that it would hold a statewide recount of the presidential vote. The move was in response to petitions from two candidates, the Green Party's Jill Stein and independent Rocky Roque De La Fuente.

Federal law requires that all recounts be finished 35 days after the election, which is Dec. 13. One or both of the candidates will be required to pay for the recount.

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UPDATE: Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein has filed a request for a recount of votes in Wisconsin's presidential election.

Republican Donald Trump won Wisconsin over Democrat Hillary Clinton by about 22,000 votes. Stein got about 30,000 votes.

Stein made the request late Friday afternoon and must pay for the costs associated with the recount.

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Although the presidential election is behind us, there’s still one more essential procedural step. Members of the Electoral College will meet in December to officially install Donald Trump as the nation’s 45th President. 

The process has come under fire this year, because Hillary Clinton received the popular vote while Donald Trump picked up the electoral votes needed to win. And, there’s been some talk of electors casting protest votes.

South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley said Tuesday the fact that Republicans now control the White House, Congress and so many governors' mansions has left her "giddy."

Haley and the rest of the Republican Governors Association are meeting this week in Orlando, Fla., to discuss their party's victories last week and how they hope to work with President-elect Donald Trump.

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President-elect Donald Trump has picked former Wisconsin Republican Party chair Reince Priebus as chief of staff. House Speaker Paul Ryan appears poised to maintain his position. And Gov. Scott Walker has just become chairman of the Republican Governors Association.

The three are close, they share an ideology, and they’ve risen to prominence at about the same time. WUWM wondered about their impact nationally, including on Trump's victory in Wisconsin. It was the first for the party in decades.

A study has commenced at UW-Madison, to determine whether Wisconsin's Voter ID law contributed to the state's lowest turnout for a presidential election in more than two decades. Approximately 66 percent of eligible state voters cast ballots in the November 8th election, down about four percentage points compared with 2012 and three percentage points from what Wisconsin elections officials had forecast.

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In Wisconsin, the Marquette Law School Poll had Hillary Clinton winning by six points. She lost by one.

Poll Director Charles Franklin says it will take months of study to gather any clear idea about why polls nationwide were so wrong about who was going to win, but he says exit polling provides some clues. It revealed many voters hadn’t yet decided who they wanted for president when Marquette took its last poll of the 2016 election season.

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Many people in Milwaukee are still coming to grips with the results of the presidential election. More than 1,000 people gathered in Red Arrow Park on Thursday night and then took to the streets to protest Donald Trump’s impending presidency.

Rallies were held in other cities across the country for a second night in a row. Some marchers in downtown Milwaukee voiced a desire to keep the demonstrations peaceful.

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The reverberations from the election of Donald Trump to the presidency are continuing to echo around Wisconsin, the country, and the world.  In fact, it seems people in other countries are having almost as many conversations about the historic 2016 election as in the United States. 

Claire Bolderson is a former BBC correspondent and now independent journalist who has covered numerous US elections and other momentous ballot issues, such as the Brexit vote earlier this year.  From London, she added her take on the election.

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During the early hours of Election Day, the local immigrant advocacy group spread the word. It planned to celebrate historic Latino voter turnout.

But rather than celebratory, it was somber. While Latino voters in Wisconsin backed Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump by a margin of 87 to 10 percent, Trump emerged with a stunning victory.

As the November election approached, Valeria Ruiz served as campaign coordinator for Voces de la Frontera in Racine, Wisconsin.

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One of the many surprises of Tuesday's elections was the fact that Donald Trump won Wisconsin's electoral votes. The last Republican to do so was Ronald Reagan, more than 30 years ago.

Christopher Murray, of the Les Aspin Center for Government in Washington, D.C. has been crunching the numbers to find out why the state turned red.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton finds herself on the wrong end of an electoral split, moving ahead in the popular vote but losing to President-elect Donald Trump in the Electoral College, according to election results that are still being finalized.

As of midday Thursday ET, Clinton had amassed 59,938,290 votes nationally, to Trump's 59,704,886 — a margin of 233,404 that puts Clinton on track to become the fifth U.S. presidential candidate to win the popular vote but lose the election.

When Donald Trump came down the escalator in June of 2015 in the tower he named for himself in Manhattan, few of us who do politics for a living took his off-the-cuff announcement for president seriously.

But the past 17 months have been a lesson to all of us who flattered ourselves — as campaign pros, polling pros and media pros — that we knew more about politics than he did.

What have we learned? That Trump was being taken very seriously, indeed, by the people who ultimately mattered: voters.

President-elect Donald Trump has promised over and over in recent months that he will repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also called Obamacare, when he reaches the White House.

"Obamacare is a disaster. You know it. We all know it," Trump said at a debate last month. "We have to repeal it and replace it with something absolutely much less expensive."

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