election

Final Day of the Campaign in Wisconsin

Nov 7, 2016
Spencer Plat and Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Neither Donald Trump nor Hillary Clinton campaigned for president over the weekend in Wisconsin, but each camp sent its vice presidential nominee.

In Milwaukee Sunday, Democrat Tim Kaine rallied activists who are helping turn-out the vote, saying the Clinton campaign can't take anything for grant. The vice presidential candidate said the stakes are too high, and polls can be wrong.

Rachel Morello

How can we turn out the vote? That’s one of the biggest challenges facing both political parties this election. It’s also a question some millenials want to tackle, because they’ve posted the lowest turnout rate of any demographic group over the last few elections.

Student leaders at Milwaukee’s Mount Mary University are trying to change that by “engaging” their friends – quite literally.

Republicans are feeling the best they have this cycle about their chances of holding their majority in the U.S. Senate, but doing that would require several states to break their way on election night. That's a risky place to be one day before control of the Senate is decided.

The tightening of the presidential race over the past week may have had an impact on these Senate contests. Most of the contests remain firm toss-ups, though Democrats still have multiple paths to winning back the five seats they need (or just four if Democrat Hillary Clinton wins the presidency).

DESTINA, FOTOLIA

If you head to the polls Tuesday, don't just expect to see voters and election workers. Observers of all stripes also could be there, keeping an eye on the goings-on.

For months, GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump has been urging supporters to head to the polls to combat what he alleges is election-rigging. He renewed his claim recently at a rally in Green Bay.

"They say there's nothing going on (but) people that have died 10 years ago are still voting. Illegal immigrants are voting," Trump said.

Updated at 7:46 p.m. ET

Following up on his letter that set off a firestorm of speculation just two weeks before U.S. voters head to the polls to choose a new president, FBI Director James Comey says the investigative team that analyzed a new trove of emails that were either to or from Hillary Clinton has finished its work — and that the review doesn't change the findings he put forth in July, when he said no charges will be pursued against Clinton.

No matter who wins the presidential election on Tuesday, it's nearly certain Congress will be more narrowly divided come January.

And with no clear mandate likely coming out of 2016, there is little reason to be overly optimistic that the next Congress can escape the cycle of unproductivity and polarization that has gripped Washington in recent years.


The 115th Congress: Political Dynamics

With little chance of a Democratic House takeover in the 2016 election, the two likeliest scenarios are:

Bus route 61 in Milwaukee, Wisc., cuts through political lines in a hotly contested swing state. It travels from liberal Milwaukee through to Waukesha County, one of the most conservative in the state.

The bus route was first established to help residents in central city neighborhoods get jobs, mainly retail positions in the suburbs. For Breanna Jordan , a 24-year-old living in Milwaukee, her livelihood depends on bus route 61. She works at a Walmart in Menomonee Falls, an hour and a half bus ride each way.

Former Democratic Presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders stopped in Milwaukee Wednesday night to campaign for not only Hillary Clinton, but Russ Feingold.

Bernie Sanders devoted the first 15 or so minutes of his speech to encouraging people to get out and vote for Democrat Russ Feingold. Earlier in the day, the Marquette Poll was released showing a very tight race between Feingold and his opponent Republican incumbent Ron Johnson.

Justin Sullivan and Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Democrat Hillary Clinton's lead over Republican Donald Trump declined in Wisconsin from seven to six points during the past two weeks and now stands at 46%-40% among likely voters, according to the final Marquette Law School poll before the Nov. 8 Election. 

The margin of error is +/- 3.3 percentage points.

President Obama has called climate change a slow-moving catastrophe, yet we’ve heard little about the issue during this campaign season.

That goes for the U.S. Senate race pitting Democrat Russ Feingold and GOP incumbent Ron Johnson. Their campaigns have sizzled around their disparate views on just about everything else - from job creation to immigration.

Yet, they have said little about how they would approach the subject of climate change.

Dairy farmer Lloyd Holterman likes where Johnson stands on issues.

Chip Somodevilla and Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

As it nears its conclusion, the race for the White House paused in Wisconsin on Tuesday. Both Republican Donald Trump and Democratic vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine visited. They each told voters the state will play an important role in the election. The candidates also both made a point to question the character of the other party's nominee for president.

GOP nominee Donald Trump has made frequent appearances in Wisconsin in the last couple months. This time he chose Eau Claire.

Marti Mikkelson

Is there anything that could happen before next week’s election that would make you change your vote? New inquiries surfaced over the weekend about Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email system while she was secretary of state. A few weeks ago, Donald Trump was hit by accusations of inappropriate actions toward women. WUWM stopped by two early voting sites in Milwaukee to ask people what might be the final straw.

Charles Fletcher doesn’t think there’s anything that could happen between now and Nov. 8, that would make him change his vote in the presidential race.

Michelle Maternowski

A version of one ad Wisconsin people are seeing in the U.S. Senate race first aired more than 50 years ago. known as the "Daisy" ad. It features an atomic explosion.  It's one of the negative ads that supporters of GOP incumbent Ron Johnson and Democratic challenger Russ Feingold have been able to produce and air, because both camps have been the beneficiaries of huge injections of cash and know that negative advertising influences voters.

Updated at 7:58 p.m. ET

Newly discovered emails being examined by the FBI in relation to Hillary Clinton's email server came to light in the course of an unrelated criminal investigation of Anthony Weiner, a source familiar with the matter tells NPR's Carrie Johnson.

Weiner is the estranged husband of close Clinton aide Huma Abedin; he has been under scrutiny for sending illicit text messages to an underage girl. Sources said authorities seized electronic devices in their home, which led them to this new information.

Keio Horton

A different type of presidential poll is underway at the Milwaukee Public Market – a cookie poll. C. Adams Bakery is allowing people to purchase cookies that represent their candidate of choice. It was Lisa Crum's idea. She owns C. Adams Bakery in the Milwaukee Public Market. Crum thought the politically-tinted bakery could add levity to this year's race.

“Right now, there’s so much negativity, and it takes a little bit of the negativity away from it,” Crum says.

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