election

President-elect Donald Trump has promised over and over in recent months that he will repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also called Obamacare, when he reaches the White House.

"Obamacare is a disaster. You know it. We all know it," Trump said at a debate last month. "We have to repeal it and replace it with something absolutely much less expensive."

Donald Trump's presidential campaign, like the business career that preceded it, was unpredictable, undisciplined and unreliable. Despite those qualities — or perhaps, in part, because of them — it was also successful.

So what should we expect from President-elect Trump, mindful that his path to the White House has defied expectations at every turn?

Donald Trump has been elected the 45th president of the United States, the capstone of a tumultuous and divisive campaign that won over white voters with the promise to "Make America Great Again."

Trump crossed the 270 electoral vote threshold at 2:31 a.m. ET with a victory in Wisconsin, according to Associated Press projections.

Bonnie Petrie

Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson became the first state Republican to win election to the U.S. Senate during a presidential year, since 1980. On Tuesday, he again defeated former Democrat Senator Russ Feingold in a rematch of Wisconsin's 2010 Senate race. Johnson's win helped Republicans remain in control of the Senate.

The incumbent argued that Feingold did not deserve to be sent back to Washington. Johnson told the Associated Press that he won Tuesday's election because, "I told the truth... I think the good folks of Wisconsin recognized that."

For the latest electoral count in the race for president, visit NPR's live blog.

As the results come in, projected winners of Wisconsin's Tuesday, November 8, 2016 general election will be marked in bold.

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES
Donald J. Trump (R)
Hillary Clinton (D)
Gary Johnson (L)
Jill Stein (Green)

Mitch Teich

People have been inundated with election coverage for months now, but it’s not just Americans who have been riveted to this historic campaign season. 

Many international journalists are in the United States both to cover the election and to learn more about federal elections in this country. As many casual observers have noticed, this has been an unusually contentious election cycle for the U.S. For some, the dirty politics at play in this election has reminded them of elections in their own countries. 

NPR Live Blog: Election Updates & Results

Nov 8, 2016
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

As results come in across the country, NPR reporters will be updating this breaking news blog in real time. 

The NPR Politics team, along with member station reporters, will be providing live updates in the form of photo, video, commentary and analysis for both national and local contested races.

This includes NPR’s Tamara Keith who will be covering the Clinton/Kaine election night event and NPR’s Sarah McCammon at the Trump/Pence event.

Ann-Elise Henzl

The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe has an election observation mission, which sends poll watchers to election sites around the globe. The monitors take notes on goings-on at polling places and report what they see.

Christa Mueller of Germany is among the observers sent to the United States for this fall's elections. She's part of a team, which has kept an eye on election-related activities in the Midwest in the weeks leading up to Election Day.

With all the hype surrounding Tuesday's presidential election, some voters may be tempted to take a photo at the polling place to remember the occasion. For instance, a picture of their completed ballot, or perhaps a selfie with their completed ballot.

But Wisconsin has a law that says you cannot show your completed ballot to another person. So taking a selfie at the polling site is problematic, according to Reid Magney of the Wisconsin Elections Commission. He says the issue isn't so much the photo itself, but rather what people could do with it.

WUWM Live Blog: Wisconsin Election Updates

Nov 7, 2016
Darren Hauck/Getty Images

WUWM will be updating this post throughout the day, as reporters visit polling places across the city and talk with voters. 

You can help WUWM and Electionland track voting problems by texting ELECTIONLAND to 69866.

This evening, WUWM's LaToya Dennis will be at Paul Ryan's party in Janesville, Marti Mikkelson will be in Middleton at Russ Feingold's and Bonnie Petrie will be in Oshkosh with Ron Johnson.

Final Day of the Campaign in Wisconsin

Nov 7, 2016
Spencer Plat and Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Neither Donald Trump nor Hillary Clinton campaigned for president over the weekend in Wisconsin, but each camp sent its vice presidential nominee.

In Milwaukee Sunday, Democrat Tim Kaine rallied activists who are helping turn-out the vote, saying the Clinton campaign can't take anything for grant. The vice presidential candidate said the stakes are too high, and polls can be wrong.

Rachel Morello

How can we turn out the vote? That’s one of the biggest challenges facing both political parties this election. It’s also a question some millenials want to tackle, because they’ve posted the lowest turnout rate of any demographic group over the last few elections.

Student leaders at Milwaukee’s Mount Mary University are trying to change that by “engaging” their friends – quite literally.

Republicans are feeling the best they have this cycle about their chances of holding their majority in the U.S. Senate, but doing that would require several states to break their way on election night. That's a risky place to be one day before control of the Senate is decided.

The tightening of the presidential race over the past week may have had an impact on these Senate contests. Most of the contests remain firm toss-ups, though Democrats still have multiple paths to winning back the five seats they need (or just four if Democrat Hillary Clinton wins the presidency).

DESTINA, FOTOLIA

If you head to the polls Tuesday, don't just expect to see voters and election workers. Observers of all stripes also could be there, keeping an eye on the goings-on.

For months, GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump has been urging supporters to head to the polls to combat what he alleges is election-rigging. He renewed his claim recently at a rally in Green Bay.

"They say there's nothing going on (but) people that have died 10 years ago are still voting. Illegal immigrants are voting," Trump said.

Updated at 7:46 p.m. ET

Following up on his letter that set off a firestorm of speculation just two weeks before U.S. voters head to the polls to choose a new president, FBI Director James Comey says the investigative team that analyzed a new trove of emails that were either to or from Hillary Clinton has finished its work — and that the review doesn't change the findings he put forth in July, when he said no charges will be pursued against Clinton.

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