election

The office of New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman issued a "Notice of Violation" to the Donald J. Trump Foundation and ordered the foundation to cease and desist from soliciting contributions in New York.

The notice states that the Trump Foundation failed to register with the Charities Bureau before soliciting contributions or engaging in fundraising activities.

Most Americans remember the 1990s as a prosperous time when companies were expanding, wages rising and stock prices soaring. In 1997, Fortune magazine published a story headlined: "These Are The Good Old Days ... The U.S. Economy Is Stronger Than It's Ever Been Before."

Donald Trump's campaign is responding to a New York Times report that the real estate mogul claimed hundreds of millions of dollars in losses on tax returns in 1995 — an amount that could have allowed him to legally avoid paying income taxes for many years.

The 1995 tax records obtained by the newspaper show Trump as having reported a $916 million loss on personal income tax returns during that year.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Republican Presidential Nominee Donald Trump delivered a rousing speech to a packed house in Waukesha on Wednesday night. Several thousand people turned out to see Trump at the Waukesha County Expo Center. Trump made many promises during the rally, but also spent time bashing his Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton.

Many supporters wore red baseball caps and waved signs that read “Make America Great Again.” Trump started off by blasting Hillary Clinton, particularly in her performance as Secretary of State during the Obama administration.

GOP Presidential hopeful Donald Trump is scheduled to lead a rally at the Waukesha County Expo Center Wednesday evening. While Wisconsin is considered a battle ground state, it has been decades since a Republican won the state’s presidential vote. On Tuesday, we spoke to early voters in Milwaukee about the issues driving them to the polls. Today, we bring you voices from the streets of Waukesha.

You could see the contrast in the eyes of the respective candidates' spokespersons, surrogates and family members after the first presidential debate of 2016 had wrapped.

As always, earnest efforts were made on both sides to claim victory — even insist on it — after the nationally televised clash between Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican nominee Donald Trump.

"Trump was especially strong on the issues in the first 45 minutes," said former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski on CNN.

Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

Some Milwaukee voters didn't wait to hear Monday night's debate, as Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump attempted to woo voters. In-person absentee voting began Monday in downtown Milwaukee at the Zeidler Municipal Building. 

Business was brisk. We asked a number of voters what issues were important to them as they cast their ballots. Additional early voting sites on the north and south sides will open October 10.

JEFF BERMAN:

Rick Wilking - Pool/Getty Images

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton go head-to-head in the first presidential debate Monday night. NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate.

Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors.

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The first presidential debate tonight is shaping up to be one of the most-watched political events ever, with a potentially Super Bowl-size audience.

Here are four things to watch for as Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump take the stage at Hofstra University on Long Island.

1. Which Trump shows up

Donald Trump "won" the primary debates by dominating his opponents, often by name-calling and bluster. This one will be different.

From his studio in the battleground state of Wisconsin, talk radio host Charlie Sykes has held the mantle of modern conservatism for more than two decades. Every day, he goes on the air for three straight hours, vetting rising stars and inviting Republican leaders and listeners to hash out the issues of the day.

"I think it's fair to say that there's been no conservative leader in Wisconsin who hasn't been a regular guest on my show," Sykes says. "If you wanted to be introduced, you needed to go through conservative talk radio."

    

The fall elections are less than two months away, and the Wisconsin race for U.S. Senate appears to be tightening. Incumbent Ron Johnson is trying to secure a second term against Democratic challenger Russ Feingold, in a rematch from 2010.

This time around, each candidate has been trying to link the other to his party’s presidential nominee. The reason – both candidates at the top have low favorability numbers.

Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

Wisconsin has had its share this year of visits from Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Thursday night, it was Gary Johnson's turn. The Libertarian presidential hopeful stopped in Milwaukee for a spirited rally.

Donald Trump has provided the political world with many moving moments over the past year, but none quite like the whiplash mood swing between his daytime and nighttime performances in Mexico City and Phoenix on Wednesday.

Hours before he is slated to make a major policy speech on immigration Wednesday in Phoenix, Donald Trump is making a bold move — he will be meeting with Mexico's president.

He tweeted the news late Tuesday night:

"I have accepted the invitation of President Enrique Peña Nieto, of Mexico, and look very much forward to meeting him tomorrow."

Wisconsin’s two candidates for U.S. Senate have been crisscrossing the state this summer, talking about issues that matter to voters. In Milwaukee lately, people have been concerned about a fatal police shooting and violence in the Sherman Park neighborhood. Republican Sen. Ron Johnson and Democratic challenger Russ Feingold have weighed in on Milwaukee’s struggles. The two have differing solutions.

While speaking to the Kiwanis Club in Milwaukee, incumbent Sen. Ron Johnson says the violence that broke out near Sherman Park is understandable.

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