election

Bus route 61 in Milwaukee, Wisc., cuts through political lines in a hotly contested swing state. It travels from liberal Milwaukee through to Waukesha County, one of the most conservative in the state.

The bus route was first established to help residents in central city neighborhoods get jobs, mainly retail positions in the suburbs. For Breanna Jordan , a 24-year-old living in Milwaukee, her livelihood depends on bus route 61. She works at a Walmart in Menomonee Falls, an hour and a half bus ride each way.

Former Democratic Presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders stopped in Milwaukee Wednesday night to campaign for not only Hillary Clinton, but Russ Feingold.

Bernie Sanders devoted the first 15 or so minutes of his speech to encouraging people to get out and vote for Democrat Russ Feingold. Earlier in the day, the Marquette Poll was released showing a very tight race between Feingold and his opponent Republican incumbent Ron Johnson.

Justin Sullivan and Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Democrat Hillary Clinton's lead over Republican Donald Trump declined in Wisconsin from seven to six points during the past two weeks and now stands at 46%-40% among likely voters, according to the final Marquette Law School poll before the Nov. 8 Election. 

The margin of error is +/- 3.3 percentage points.

President Obama has called climate change a slow-moving catastrophe, yet we’ve heard little about the issue during this campaign season.

That goes for the U.S. Senate race pitting Democrat Russ Feingold and GOP incumbent Ron Johnson. Their campaigns have sizzled around their disparate views on just about everything else - from job creation to immigration.

Yet, they have said little about how they would approach the subject of climate change.

Dairy farmer Lloyd Holterman likes where Johnson stands on issues.

Chip Somodevilla and Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

As it nears its conclusion, the race for the White House paused in Wisconsin on Tuesday. Both Republican Donald Trump and Democratic vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine visited. They each told voters the state will play an important role in the election. The candidates also both made a point to question the character of the other party's nominee for president.

GOP nominee Donald Trump has made frequent appearances in Wisconsin in the last couple months. This time he chose Eau Claire.

Marti Mikkelson

Is there anything that could happen before next week’s election that would make you change your vote? New inquiries surfaced over the weekend about Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email system while she was secretary of state. A few weeks ago, Donald Trump was hit by accusations of inappropriate actions toward women. WUWM stopped by two early voting sites in Milwaukee to ask people what might be the final straw.

Charles Fletcher doesn’t think there’s anything that could happen between now and Nov. 8, that would make him change his vote in the presidential race.

Michelle Maternowski

A version of one ad Wisconsin people are seeing in the U.S. Senate race first aired more than 50 years ago. known as the "Daisy" ad. It features an atomic explosion.  It's one of the negative ads that supporters of GOP incumbent Ron Johnson and Democratic challenger Russ Feingold have been able to produce and air, because both camps have been the beneficiaries of huge injections of cash and know that negative advertising influences voters.

Updated at 7:58 p.m. ET

Newly discovered emails being examined by the FBI in relation to Hillary Clinton's email server came to light in the course of an unrelated criminal investigation of Anthony Weiner, a source familiar with the matter tells NPR's Carrie Johnson.

Weiner is the estranged husband of close Clinton aide Huma Abedin; he has been under scrutiny for sending illicit text messages to an underage girl. Sources said authorities seized electronic devices in their home, which led them to this new information.

Keio Horton

A different type of presidential poll is underway at the Milwaukee Public Market – a cookie poll. C. Adams Bakery is allowing people to purchase cookies that represent their candidate of choice. It was Lisa Crum's idea. She owns C. Adams Bakery in the Milwaukee Public Market. Crum thought the politically-tinted bakery could add levity to this year's race.

“Right now, there’s so much negativity, and it takes a little bit of the negativity away from it,” Crum says.

Michael Fleshman https://www.flickr.com/photos/fleshmanpix/ / Creative Commons https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

If you had to guess, which demographic of American society do you think votes, in the highest numbers?

The answer – in the last two general elections: black women.

If you applied for an absentee ballot – you need to know about a new state law. It requires you to mail back your ballot earlier than in the past, so that it arrives by 8:00 P.M. on election night, otherwise, your vote won’t count.

Under Wisconsin’s old rule, mail-in ballots had to be postmarked prior to Election Day. Then the clerk would count them, as long as they arrived by 4 p.m. on the Friday after the election.

But a new law took effect in September. It requires absentee ballots to arrive in clerk’s offices by the time polls close on Election Night.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump had one job in his third and final debate with Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton: break out.

He needed to break out from the narrative that is fast enveloping his campaign — the way evening overtakes the late afternoon.

He needed a breakout performance showing himself to be disciplined and knowledgeable enough to be president.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has been ruffling feathers lately by suggesting there could be massive fraud at the polls on Nov. 8. Local elections officials are among the many refuting Trump's allegations and insist every voters' ballot will count.

At a campaign stop in Green Bay, Wisconsin this week, Trump said: "They even want to try to rig the election at the polling booths. And believe me, there's a lot going on."

He repeated his claim of a 'rigged' election during Wednesday's debate:

Win McNamee/Getty Images

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the final presidential debate Wednesday night at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

The debate will be split up into six 15-minute segments. Each segment will be dedicated to a topic selected by moderator Chris Wallace of FOX News.

Wallace selected these topics for the debate: debt and entitlements, immigration, economy, supreme court, foreign hot spots and fitness to be president. These may change, depending on news developments.

Wisconsin’s two candidates for U.S. Senate debated one final time Tuesday night. It took place on WISN-TV in Milwaukee. Republican incumbent Ron Johnson and Democratic challenger Russ Feingold spelled out how they differ. 

From the outset, the two candidates made it clear that they would spend a lot of time trying to tie each other to their party’s presidential candidate.

While incumbent Ron Johnson blasted Secretary Hillary Clinton over her private e-mail server, former Senator and challenger Russ Feingold said that Trump is not qualified to be president.

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