The final presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump is on Wednesday at 9 p.m. ET. It's the last chance either candidate will have to make a closing argument before tens of millions of voters.

It follows yet another unprecedented week in the campaign, in which Trump has repeatedly questioned the legitimacy of the election, predicting that it will be stolen from him through media bias and massive voter fraud.

Donald Trump is warning that the election will be rigged. He has precisely zero evidence to back up that claim. But he has a remarkably receptive audience.

Around 30 percent of Americans have "little or no confidence" that votes will be counted accurately — and Trump's voters are far less confident about that than Clinton's.

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Thousands of people turned out to see Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump in Green Bay Monday night. Trump vowed to win Wisconsin in November and reiterated familiar promises to build a wall at the Mexican border and renegotiate trade deals. But, Trump also rolled out something new - a package of ethics reforms that he says are designed to end government corruption.

Trump took the stage to chants of “USA” and “lock her up” in reference to his opponent, Democrat Hillary Clinton. Trump bashed Clinton for her ethics, after WikiLeaks revealed a slew of hacked emails.

Incumbent Sen. Ron Johnson and Democratic challenger Russ Feingold covered a myriad of issues in a debate Friday night in Green Bay. Polling shows the two candidates are locked in a tight race, with Feingold leading by only two points.

The meeting started off with each hopeful defending their endorsements of their party’s presidential nominees. While Sen. Johnson didn’t mention Donald Trump by name, he indicated his support. He says the two agree on major issues.

When Jessica Leeds was a traveling paper saleswoman in the late 1970s and early 1980s, she told herself that sexual harassment was just a fact of life.

"You didn't complain about that sort of thing," she told NPR in an interview Friday, which will air on All Things Considered.

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House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin has been in Donald Trump's crosshairs this week. That's because Ryan said that although he'll vote for Trump, he’ll focus these remaining weeks leading up to November's election on keeping GOP control of the House, not on helping Trump campaign. Ryan made his comments after the video surfaced last week, showing Trump making lewd, predatory comments about women.

With the Trump-Ryan rift grabbing headlines, the media packed into a speech Ryan had scheduled in Brookfield on Thursday. But he had other issues on his agenda.

Republican Sen. Ron Johnson and Democratic challenger Russ Feingold will go head-to-head Friday night in a debate in Green Bay. The two are locked in a tight contest, with a new poll showing just a two point differential. 

One issue that’s heated up just this week is national health care. The two candidates have differing plans for the future of President Obama’s Affordable Care Act.

At 10:33 p.m. on Aug. 21, 2015, Hillary Clinton's lead speechwriter sent around an email with the subject line "Script." In it is a draft of a video address to supporters where Clinton would try to explain the private email system she used while secretary of state "directly, in one place, at one time, as best as I can."

This came just three days after an explosive exchange at a press conference between Clinton and a Fox News correspondent, where Clinton was asked whether she had ordered her server wiped clean. She shrugged and said, "What, like, with a cloth or something?"

Updated Dec. 6, 2017, at 11:35 a.m. ET.

For the first time, President Trump publicly addressed allegations against Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore on Tuesday. The president defended Moore, who is accused of making unwanted sexual advances toward teenage girls as young as 14 when he was in his 30s.

"Let me just tell you, Roy Moore denies it," Trump said. "That's all I can say. He denies it. And by the way, he totally denies it."

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The latest Marquette Law School Poll was released on Wednesday. It says Democrat Hillary Clinton has the support of 44 percent of likely voters. Republican Donald Trump, meanwhile, has the backing of 37 percent of likely voters.

Gary Johnson, the Libertarian candidate, had the backing of nine percent of likely voters, while Jill Stein of the Green Party captured three percent. Six percent of voters surveyed remain uncommitted.

After a video surfaced last week showing Donald Trump boasting in 2005 how he would kiss and grope women without consent, the GOP nominee insisted in Sunday's presidential debate that it was just "locker room talk" and, pressed repeatedly by CNN's Anderson Cooper, finally said that he had never actually taken the action he described.

The nation continues to watch developments in the race for president, stemming from Donald Trump's offensive comments about women caught on tape in 2005. The fallout has Wisconsin state lawmakers talking. They're pondering whether the controversy surrounding Trump will affect races for the Legislature here.

Wisconsin state Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald has backed fellow Republican Trump for months. At a WisPolitics.com luncheon on Tuesday, he was asked about Trump's boasts that as a celebrity, he could freely kiss and grope women.

Miguel Ariel Contreras Drake-McLaughlin/Flickr

Fun fact: Bob Woodward doesn't vote. 

The legendary investigative reporter, a veteran of the Washington Post where he played a role in uncovering the Watergate scandal, says his public duty lies elsewhere.

"I used to take my daughters into the voting booth and let them vote for me," Woodward says. "I don't want to spend time trying to think that out. I want to try to spend time, what can we learn about these people that we don't know?"

Donald Trump declared "the shackles have been taken off me" Tuesday morning on Twitter.

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This election year, WUWM and other public radio stations have collaborated with NPR on A Nation Engaged. The project has probed voters on how they feel about a variety of issues.

In our final installments this week, we ask Milwaukeeans what it means to them to be Americans, and what the next president could do to advance that vision. We collected these responses at a job fair for veterans in Milwaukee.