essay

Essay: Go, Cubs, Go!

Oct 27, 2016
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In case you’d missed it – and it would be hard – the Chicago Cubs are trying to do something they haven’t done in 108 years – win a World Series. They haven’t even been to the Fall Classic for decades.  Lake Effect Avi Lank remembers someone who would truly appreciate this post-season:

Essay: In Praise of Small Towns

Oct 26, 2016
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This campaign season has brought many divisions this country faces to the forefront. But beyond the liberal-conservative, black and white, and male and female divides, essayist J.F. Riordan says there is another division that has become a regular part of life in America:

A writer in a national magazine recently theorized that small town voters who are worried about the deterioration of American culture are “insular”, and unenlightened, stuck in the past, resistant to progress.

Since You Never Asked: 'Selfie, Schmelfie'

Oct 25, 2016
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If you stop by Lake Effect’s website, you can see pictures of each of our contributors.  That includes essayist Jonathan West, who would like to point that he did not take the picture of himself:

Since you never asked…

…I’m not good looking enough to curate a gallery of Jonathan West selfies. Besides, I almost always look like I need a shave, and who really needs to see that?

Essay: Stitched to Kill

Oct 21, 2016
David Szymanski

Whether you usually shop at The Gap, or Target or Nordstrom or a small boutique, chances are good that there’s probably at least one item of clothing in your wardrobe that was once worn by someone else.

Pavel Losevsky / Fotolia

If you’ve ever taken a child to the library or the bookstore, you know that sometimes there’s a little friction between what they want to read, and what you’d like them to read.  “Captain Underpants” versus “Stuart Little.”  “Calvin and Hobbes” versus “A Wrinkle In Time.”  Lake Effect essayist Christianna Fritz urges you not to fall into that false dichotomy:

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Essayist Jim Spangler spent much of his working life at and around newspapers, during which he met people from many walks of life. But it was as a small town Iowa teenager, working a paper route, that he says he learned some of his first lessons about profit, people, and prejudice:

When I hung up my newspaper bag for the last time 58-years-ago, the Clinton (IA) Herald, my home town daily, was delivered and paid for by every single one of the 68 families on my route. Everyone except Old Ed (black '49 Chrysler). 

Essay: Army of Women

Oct 6, 2016
Marianne Meyer

With the first female candidate on a major party ticket, people have been reassessing the state of feminism in this country. The term “feminist” itself is socially charged - with differing opinions on its true definition. For Lake Effect essayist, Jacey Powers, an interesting encounter with friends led her to reexamine her own rocky road to becoming a feminist.

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For the majority of Major League Baseball teams (including the Brewers), the season comes to an end this weekend. Players will go home to their families, and sports fans will turn their full attention to the playoffs, or to football. Many people will miss watching the games on television, but Lake Effect essayist Jim Spangler is not among them. 

“Why don’t you come up stairs and watch the baseball game on TV?” my wife asked during a recent Milwaukee Brewers broadcast.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr

If you've been paying attention to current events, it's pretty hard not to notice all the conversations surrounding immigrants and what it means to be an American. In a country founded by immigrants and outsiders, differing opinions on immigration have become a dividing force in an increasingly divided nation. Lake Effect contributor Kyle Cherek has also found himself thinking about immigrants – especially when it comes to food production.

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Joanne Weintraub still watches TV. But it’s a lot less TV than she watched for years, when she was the TV critic for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Weintraub, discusses her new views on TV in an essay that appears in this month's Milwaukee Magazine

Essay: The Real Working Class Heroes, NRBQ

Sep 13, 2016
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Many bands from the 1960s and 70s have found new life and fans in the 21st century, even if some the original band members are no longer with us. Lake Effect essayist Tom Matthews was an old fan of one such band.

Photo courtesy of Jessie Garcia

This piece originally aired June 2, 2016. Abe Landsman, age 102, passed away September 2, 2016, peacefully at his home in Madison. 

A couple of videos went viral in the last few weeks featuring some of America’s oldest citizens.  One was of a 92-year old World War II veteran who threw out the first pitch at a Major League Baseball game on Memorial Day. 

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Lake Effect essayist Avi Lank sees some unusual parallels between his own career and what Milwaukee is currently working through as a community:

Essay: Reading Myself

Aug 4, 2016
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Another German Fest has come and gone, and so has Festa Italiana, and Summerfest. And now we're onto the Wisconsin State Fair, which opens this week, along with the Milwaukee Comedy Festival we mentioned in the previous segment. When that's all done, Irish Fest is not far behind.

Essay: How Do You Solve a Problem Like Woody Allen?

Jul 30, 2016
Pascal Le Segretain / Getty Images

Woody Allen is one of the most recognized and controversial film directors. Since 1965 he has made about one film a year. Often his films center on an older lead man and his young female partner, or explore themes of difficult relationships and existential concepts.

Allen’s latest film “Café Society” was released this month, and film critic Duane Dudek shares his thoughts on the prolific director:

How do you solve a problem like Woody Allen?

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