film

Maayan Silver

Six years ago, Will Lautzenheiser was starting a job teaching film at Montana State University, when he started to feel a pain in his leg. After his first two classes, he went to the hospital where he went into total organ failure. In a matter of days, a strep infection had caused Will to lose his arms and legs.

Maayan Silver

There’s graffiti or unsanctioned street art, and then there’s public art.

Sometimes the lines are blurred, sometimes it’s very clear which is which. But as cities around the country try to reduce vandalism, they are enlisting artists to make sanctioned public art and create spaces that not only replace the blight, but engage the communities they are in.

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

The TV show “Bill Nye: The Science Guy” was a staple for countless kids raised in the 90s. He turned on a generation to science, demonstrating the way the natural world works in a way that kids young and old could understand.

Now Nye - both his science guy persona, and the man himself - is the subject of documentary being featured in the 2017 Milwaukee Film Festival. Bill Nye: Science Guy is directed by Jason Sussberg and David Alvarado.

Courtesy of Planned Parenthood

This week, the US House of Representatives passed a 20-week abortion ban. The announcement came just days after both houses of Congress failed to renew the Children's Health Insurance Program, and a day before the Trump Administration issued a rule limiting women's access to birth control.

Chasing Bubbles / facebook.com

If you knew the late Alex Rust when he was a young man, you might not have expected he'd become the subject of a documentary.  Rust was a farm boy from Indiana who became a day trader, working at the Chicago Board of Trade.  By the time he was 25, he realized he had other fish to fry.

"Manlife" Documentary

If you’ve ever taken a drive south along I-94, you might remember seeing a roadside sign in Sturtevant - near Racine - that advertised the "University of Lawsonomy." Or you might have seen the painted sign on a barn that says “Study Natural Law.”

The "law" in question is Lawsonomy: a utopian movement that began in 1929 by Alfred Lawson, a British immigrant who, before he started the eponymous Lawsonomy, founded two Wisconsin airplane manufacturers, and is credited as the inventor of the first passenger airliner.

fabioderby / Fotolia

Millennials seem to get a bad rap these days. Whether it's because they aren't buying homes or are supposedly spending all of their money on avocados, criticism is in no short supply. Typically trends about millennials are not a huge concern for filmmaker and Milwaukee Short Film Festival founder Ross Bigley, but a recent New York Post article caught his attention.

Vonnie Quest

In the past few years, Milwaukee Short Film Festival organizers have received an increasing number of submissions from women, people of color, and local filmmakers. And the festival, now in its 19th year, has been evolving to reflect that. Like last year, the event will showcase both diversity and women in filmmaking.

The festival’s five separate programs will each showcase eight to ten short films.

Photograph by A24 / Everett

There are hundreds of heist films in cinematic history. From How to Steal A Million, to Reservoir Dogs, The Italian Job, and the aptly named film Heist.

DETROIT Movie / facebook.com

Over five days during the summer of 1967, rioting and civil unrest tore apart the city of Detroit, Michigan. The riots left 43 people dead, thousands injured, and more than 2,000 businesses burned or looted.

Detroit, a new film by Kathryn Bigelow, tells the story of the unrest, but in particular the events that transpired at the Algiers Motel. That’s where three young African American men were murdered by police and nine other people, seven black men and two white women, endured brutal beatings.

Baby Driver / facebook.com

Summertime is peak season for moviegoers. Studios tend to release blockbusters, and market their films toward the younger audiences who are mostly out of school.

This summer saw the release of movies like Wonder Woman, Valerian, Dunkirk, Baby Driver, and Girls Trip. But as nationally syndicated radio host and resident film review Ryan Jay notes, some films worked better than others:
 

Annie Leibovitz / Vogue

Sophia Coppola's latest film, "The Beguiled," is set at a Confederate girls school in Virginia, where a group of sheltered young women take in a union soldier during the Civil War. The film is a remake of a 1971 film of the same name starring Clint Eastwood and both are adaptations of the 1966 book "Painted Devil," by Thomas P. Cullinan. 

mts3k.com

Before its recent reboot on Netflix, Mystery Science Theater 3000 (MST3K) was a longtime staple of Comedy Central in the 1990s. The show featured a hapless guy shot into space, sentenced to watch bad movies with his homemade robots. 

Originally that hapless guy went by the name of Joel and was played by the show's creator, Joel Hodgson, a native of Fort Atkinson who found inspiration in Milwaukee television programs of the 1970s. "Local TV was so influential on the creation of Mystery Science Theater," says Hodgson. 

Audrey Nowakowski

The Oriental Theatre on Milwaukee's east side turned 90 at the beginning of this month. Its first day in operation was on July 2nd, 1927.

Lake Effect recently highlighted Milwaukee Film’s long-term lease of the Oriental Theatre, which will begin in July of next year.  Milwaukee Film is the latest in a long line of organizations and individuals who have operated the theater during its history.

UWM

Milwaukee Film - which runs the annual Milwaukee Film Festival - recently announced it had acquired a 31-year lease for the Oriental Theater that begins in July, 2018.  Milwaukee Film’s executive director, Jonathan Jackson, couldn't be happier.

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