film

A24 Films

From Rebel Without a Cause, to The Breakfast Club, to 10 Things I Hate About You, coming-of-age movies have been around for almost as long as the film industry.

Low Strung / facebook.com

Many people had childhood hobbies that perhaps fell to the way side as they grew older. However, filmmaking for Milwaukee natives Victoria Lee and Lili K started at age 11 when they created a horror trilogy about a serial killer who wreaked havoc on their friends at slumber parties.

The "Oops I Peed My Pants," "Oops I Did It Again," and "Oops I Peed the Pool" trilogy created by Lee and Lili K that "didn't make any sense" may be lost in the back of their professional portfolios, but their passion for creativity on camera never faltered.

Denny Rauen

More six months of protests over the Dakota Access pipeline ended in February following a law enforcement crackdown on protesters.  A federal court also denied a final request to block the last link of the pipeline.

Mount Liptak

Ever been to Antarctica? Maybe not, but if you find yourself there, make note of a peak known as Mount Liptak. When Milwaukee filmmaker Ryan Allsop found out that that very mountain is named after his uncle, Navy veteran Lester Liptak, - he knew he had a story to share.

"When I heard the final story about how he had a mountain named after him on Antarctica, being a filmmaker and one who tells a lot of stories and loves writing - it just clicked," says Allsop. "It was just the final thing, 'this is a movie right here, this is incredible.'"

Warner Bros. Pictures

When Ridely Scott's Blade Runner hit theaters in 1982, its shocking, dystopian future world alienated audiences. It didn't do well at the box office and only years later did it become a cult favorite.

35 years later, Blade Runner 2049 expands the Los Angeles of the original as well as upon the basic question of the original film: what does it mean to be human?

Maayan Silver

Six years ago, Will Lautzenheiser was starting a job teaching film at Montana State University, when he started to feel a pain in his leg. After his first two classes, he went to the hospital where he went into total organ failure. In a matter of days, a strep infection had caused Will to lose his arms and legs.

Maayan Silver

There’s graffiti or unsanctioned street art, and then there’s public art.

Sometimes the lines are blurred, sometimes it’s very clear which is which. But as cities around the country try to reduce vandalism, they are enlisting artists to make sanctioned public art and create spaces that not only replace the blight, but engage the communities they are in.

Susan Bence / Milwaukee Public Radio

The TV show “Bill Nye: The Science Guy” was a staple for countless kids raised in the 90s. He turned on a generation to science, demonstrating the way the natural world works in a way that kids young and old could understand.

Now Nye - both his science guy persona, and the man himself - is the subject of documentary being featured in the 2017 Milwaukee Film Festival. Bill Nye: Science Guy is directed by Jason Sussberg and David Alvarado.

Courtesy of Planned Parenthood

This week, the US House of Representatives passed a 20-week abortion ban. The announcement came just days after both houses of Congress failed to renew the Children's Health Insurance Program, and a day before the Trump Administration issued a rule limiting women's access to birth control.

Chasing Bubbles / facebook.com

If you knew the late Alex Rust when he was a young man, you might not have expected he'd become the subject of a documentary.  Rust was a farm boy from Indiana who became a day trader, working at the Chicago Board of Trade.  By the time he was 25, he realized he had other fish to fry.

"Manlife" Documentary

If you’ve ever taken a drive south along I-94, you might remember seeing a roadside sign in Sturtevant - near Racine - that advertised the "University of Lawsonomy." Or you might have seen the painted sign on a barn that says “Study Natural Law.”

The "law" in question is Lawsonomy: a utopian movement that began in 1929 by Alfred Lawson, a British immigrant who, before he started the eponymous Lawsonomy, founded two Wisconsin airplane manufacturers, and is credited as the inventor of the first passenger airliner.

fabioderby / Fotolia

Millennials seem to get a bad rap these days. Whether it's because they aren't buying homes or are supposedly spending all of their money on avocados, criticism is in no short supply. Typically trends about millennials are not a huge concern for filmmaker and Milwaukee Short Film Festival founder Ross Bigley, but a recent New York Post article caught his attention.

Vonnie Quest

In the past few years, Milwaukee Short Film Festival organizers have received an increasing number of submissions from women, people of color, and local filmmakers. And the festival, now in its 19th year, has been evolving to reflect that. Like last year, the event will showcase both diversity and women in filmmaking.

The festival’s five separate programs will each showcase eight to ten short films.

Photograph by A24 / Everett

There are hundreds of heist films in cinematic history. From How to Steal A Million, to Reservoir Dogs, The Italian Job, and the aptly named film Heist.

DETROIT Movie / facebook.com

Over five days during the summer of 1967, rioting and civil unrest tore apart the city of Detroit, Michigan. The riots left 43 people dead, thousands injured, and more than 2,000 businesses burned or looted.

Detroit, a new film by Kathryn Bigelow, tells the story of the unrest, but in particular the events that transpired at the Algiers Motel. That’s where three young African American men were murdered by police and nine other people, seven black men and two white women, endured brutal beatings.

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