food

Expanding Fruit & Vegetable Production

Nov 16, 2010

While Wisconsin may be number one, or close to it, in growing and producing many foods, a new agricultural report from Iowa State University finds there’s even more we could be doing in terms of fruits and vegetables. But some believe the issue is more challenging than just changing what farmers grow. Michelle Miller is associate director for the Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems at UW-Madison. She spoke with Stephanie Lecci as part of our Project Milwaukee: What's on Our Plate? series.

We travel to Organic Valley to learn how supporting family farms and committing to organic practices made this Wisconsin company very successful – and a national role model. WUWM environmental reporter Susan Bence takes us there for our Project Milwaukee: What's on Our Plate? series, and we hear from reporter Joanne Weintraub, who wrote about Organic Valley in the current issue of Milwaukee Magazine.

WUWM begins a week-long look at the state's food economy in our series, Project Milwaukee: What's on Our Plate? The foods that are grown here have always been intertwined with the state's history. Some analysts believe food is also key to the region's future. In our first installment, Ann-Elise Henzl reports on how Wisconsin became so closely associated with food.

Wisconsin food history marks the first segment of our Project Milwaukee: What’s on Our Plate? series. John Gurda is a Milwaukee historian, the author of nineteen books, including The Making of Milwaukee and Cream City Chronicles, and he’s our regular Lake Effect history contributor.

Terese Allen is the author of the new edition of The Flavor of Wisconsin: An Informal History of Food and Eating in the Badger State, published by the Wisconsin Historical Society Press.

Tomorrow on our Project Milwaukee series, What’s On Our Plate?, we move into the present and take stock of what’s being produced in Wisconsin today.

Competing Cooks

Apr 25, 2008

Four students from Badger High School in Lake Geneva Wisconsin are slicing and dicing their way through a cooking competition going on in San Diego today. The quartet won at the state level and now are up against 36 other teams from around the country.

The winning team must concoct a three-course gourmet meal in one hour, and not a second longer.

WUWM's Susan Bence meet Badgers culinary program director Russ Tronsen and his Badger High School team as they practiced for the national ProStart Invitational.

More than 20 years ago, a movement started to take shape in Rome, when angry Italians reacted to the first McDonalds in Rome. Slow Food International was born; today the nonprofit boasts more than 80,000 members. Their combined mission is to bring local food traditions away from drive-throughs and back into the home kitchen.

Martha Davis Kipcak, Dave Swanson and Steve Hargarten are members of Slow Food Southeast Wisconsin. Susan Bence joins them for dinner, and reports on the slow food movement.

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