Gov. Walker

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On Tuesday night, Gov. Scott Walker discussed his efforts to pull Wisconsin out of the Great Recession while also promising that anybody who wants a job, can get one.

It was the governor’s first state of the state address since he ended his presidential bid in September. Walker’s speech focused largely on commitments to education.

Gov. Walker began his 40-minute speech by ticking off a list of accomplishments since he first took office in 2011. He says Wisconsin has come back strong from the Great Recession that gripped the nation for several years.

Susan Bence

Gov. Walker on Thursday threw his support behind Wisconsin Congressman Paul Ryan to succeed John Boehner as Speaker of the House. Walker says Ryan is the best person for the job.

“He’s someone who has incredible respect not only within his conference, but he has respect across the aisle (be)cause he’s a doer. He gets things done,” Walker says.

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This fall in Madison, a continued partisan divide seems likely as state lawmakers get busy. Republicans and Democrats are pushing widely different agendas. A couple factors -- including the end of Gov. Walker's presidential campaign -- could influence what bills pass.

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos says Republicans, who hold the majority in his house and the Senate, have a full slate of business. He outlined the party's plans at the Capitol late last week.

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Gov. Walker returned to work this week at the State Capitol following his exit from the presidential race.

Walker faces the lowest approval ratings of his career as he settles back in to this duties. The latest Marquette Law School poll indicates that only 39 percent of state voters approve of the job he’s doing as governor.

One of the biggest issues people had with Gov. Walker’s presidential run: he just wasn’t around very much, according to JR Ross. He’s editor of wispolitics.com.

Walker
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Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker ended his campaign for President yesterday.  Walker had until recently polled at or near the top among GOP hopefuls, both nationally and in key states such as Iowa and New Hampshire, and had attracted international media attention.  But after some missteps and limited success in two Republican debates, Walker’s poll numbers had fallen to near zero in the last few days.

Scott Walker may have never had a big "oops" moment like then-Texas Gov. Rick Perry did in 2012. Instead, the Wisconsin governor had lots of little "oopses" that contributed to his political downfall and eventual withdrawal from the GOP presidential race on Monday.

For as much promise as the two-term Midwestern governor showed, there were also noticeable missteps and alarming falters along the way. After a surge in Iowa at the beginning of the year, the nascent beginnings of a campaign seemed ill-prepared to get him up to speed or correct the troubling signs.

Walker
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After tanking in the polls for weeks, Gov. Walker announced Monday he’s dropping out of the presidential race. 

Walker was seeking the Republican nomination amongst a crowded field of candidates.

Insiders say the campaign was simply running out of money. Walker quickly built-out an expansive staff, after formally getting into the race in July.

He announced his bid to a packed house in Waukesha, billing himself as someone who would shake up the gridlock on Capitol Hill.

Updated at 6:40 p.m.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker ended his campaign for president Monday, capping off a rapid rise and equally rapid fall in the GOP race.

At a brief 6 p.m. ET press conference in Madison, Wis., Walker said he was suspending his White House bid, in part, to stop the current GOP front-runner Donald Trump.

"Today I feel I am being called to lead by helping to clear the field so that a positive, conservative message can rise to the top of the field," Walker said.

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Late Monday in Madison, Gov. Scott Walker announced, "I will suspend my campaign immediately, I encourage other candidates to do the same." 

Walker said he believes he is being called to lead, by helping to clear a crowded field of Republican candidates. He also encouraged the GOP candidates remaining in the race to "offer a positive conservative alternative to the current front-runner," without naming real-estate mogul Donald Trump.

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It was a lively debate Wednesday night, as eleven GOP presidential candidates sparred on the main stage on CNN. Gov. Walker was among the hopefuls who answered questions and peppered each other for three hours.

Many political observers insisted the governor needed to do well in the second debate, in order to pull himself out of a slump in the polls.

The candidates batted around a long list of issues, ranging from Iran to immigration to gay marriage. Gov. Walker asserted himself early-on in the debate when he confronted front-runner Donald Trump.

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Gov. Scott Walker has recently fallen in the polls among GOP presidential contenders, and his approval ratings have dropped as well including, in Wisconsin. He did not generate much attention during the first GOP debate, in August, so interests may be watching to observe what he does differently this time.

UW-Madison Political Science Professor Barry Burden says Walker's initial performance was perceived as weak in several ways.

Expect Wednesday night's second GOP presidential debate to be open season on front-runner Donald Trump. The 11 top Republican contenders will take the stage at 8 p.m. ET at the Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, Calif., and their unified goal appears to be to get something to stick to the billionaire real-estate mogul. Trump has so far proved to be made of something akin to Teflon.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, whose battles with labor unions in his own state made him a hero to Republicans, is now proposing huge restrictions on unions nationally as he seeks to revitalize his presidential campaign.

On Monday, Walker released an eight-page plan to take on unions, titled "My Plan to Give Power to the People, Not the Union Bosses."

He's vowing to:

  • Eliminate the National Labor Relations Board, or NLRB.

Gov. Walker says he wants to do nationally, what he did in Wisconsin, when it comes to weakening public and private sector labor unions. He would go further by eliminating the National Labor Relations Board and striking recent orders from the Obama administration.

Last week, while on the campaign trail, Walker announced part of his plan.

Gov. Scott Walker
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Gov. Walker has been getting a lot of attention lately, but it’s not the kind the presidential hopeful wants. 

In recent weeks, he’s walked back comments on immigration, offended Muslims and criticized career politicians insisting he is not one of them. The continuous negative coverage is not something Walker was used to in Wisconsin.

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