Gov. Walker

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Gov. Scott Walker has recently fallen in the polls among GOP presidential contenders, and his approval ratings have dropped as well including, in Wisconsin. He did not generate much attention during the first GOP debate, in August, so interests may be watching to observe what he does differently this time.

UW-Madison Political Science Professor Barry Burden says Walker's initial performance was perceived as weak in several ways.

Expect Wednesday night's second GOP presidential debate to be open season on front-runner Donald Trump. The 11 top Republican contenders will take the stage at 8 p.m. ET at the Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, Calif., and their unified goal appears to be to get something to stick to the billionaire real-estate mogul. Trump has so far proved to be made of something akin to Teflon.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, whose battles with labor unions in his own state made him a hero to Republicans, is now proposing huge restrictions on unions nationally as he seeks to revitalize his presidential campaign.

On Monday, Walker released an eight-page plan to take on unions, titled "My Plan to Give Power to the People, Not the Union Bosses."

He's vowing to:

  • Eliminate the National Labor Relations Board, or NLRB.

Gov. Walker says he wants to do nationally, what he did in Wisconsin, when it comes to weakening public and private sector labor unions. He would go further by eliminating the National Labor Relations Board and striking recent orders from the Obama administration.

Last week, while on the campaign trail, Walker announced part of his plan.

Gov. Scott Walker
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Gov. Walker has been getting a lot of attention lately, but it’s not the kind the presidential hopeful wants. 

In recent weeks, he’s walked back comments on immigration, offended Muslims and criticized career politicians insisting he is not one of them. The continuous negative coverage is not something Walker was used to in Wisconsin.

Last week, while on the campaign trail, Gov. Walker was quoted as saying there are only a "handful of reasonable, moderate followers of Islam who don't share the radical beliefs" of Islamic terrorists.

Darren Hauck/Getty Images

If Wisconsin Republicans voted in their presidential primary today, 25% would pick Gov. Scott Walker, according to the new Marquette Law School Poll. In April, 40% said they would select Walker.

Most state GOP voters favor other Republican candidates. Following Walker (25%) are Ben Carson (13%), Donald Trump (9%), Ted Cruz (8%), Marco Rubio and Carly Fiorina (each 7%) and Jeb Bush (6%).

No Republican presidential hopeful this year has more riding on Iowa than Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker.

After leading in polls in Iowa most of the year, Walker is suddenly slumping. And he might have Donald Trump to blame.

It's not necessarily that the support Walker had earlier in the summer, when he was the clear front-runner in Iowa polls, has gone to the real estate mogul. Ben Carson, Carly Fiorina and Ted Cruz have seen something of a surge since the first presidential debate.

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Where Presidential Candidates Stand On Climate Change

Aug 11, 2015
ALDEN PELLETT AP

Last week, President Obama released a plan to cut carbon emissions from power plants. Climate change has also been cropping up on the presidential campaign trail — both Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders have released their own proposals.

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