Gov. Walker

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The first GOP debate of the 2016 presidential season is over. Ten of the 17 Republican hopefuls took to the stage last night in Cleveland in a debate that sometimes saw testy exchanges between the candidates. 

Not surprisingly, Planned Parenthood, Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton were recurring themes throughout the night.  And so were very pointed questions.

Gov. Walker has been outspoken on the fact that he does not believe there should be exceptions for abortion. One of the first questions he got was whether he would let a woman die to save the life of an unborn child.

To promote his economic ideas and tout his blue collar credentials, Scott Walker has been using a unique tactic: talking about his shopping habits. In his presidential campaign kick-off, the Wisconsin governor talked about how much he and his wife, Tonette, love a certain Wisconsin-based discount retailer.

"Some of you know that Tonette and I like to shop at Kohl's. Over the years, I've learned that if I'm going to buy a new shirt, I go to the rack that says that the shirt was $29.99 but now is $19.99," he said.

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Over the course of the budget process that was recently completed, questions were asked about whether Governor Walker’s presumptive Presidential campaign affected the negotiation process.

Now that Walker’s campaign is no longer just presumptive, more questions are being asked about the campaign’s implications for public policy in Wisconsin.

This story is part of NPR's series Journey Home. We're going to the places presidential candidates call home and finding out what those places tell us about how they see the world.

Scorching temperatures near the triple digits weren't driving away the 325 people gathered to hear Scott Walker speak at a Lexington, S.C., barbecue joint Wednesday.

Packed under an open-air porch with fans that were hardly helping, the heat didn't seem to affect the enthusiasm for the Wisconsin governor on just his second day as an announced presidential candidate — and it's the type of excitement he'll need to generate to win the important South Carolina GOP primary.

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The Wisconsin Supreme Court on Thursday handed Gov. Walker a major victory – just days after he officially launched his bid for President. The court effectively ended an investigation into Walker’s 2012 recall campaign. Prosecutors had been examining whether the campaign illegally coordinated activities with conservative funders such as Wisconsin Club for Growth.

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Governor Scott Walker's official presidential campaign announcement is receiving plenty of national attention - including from National Public Radio.

While NPR White House correspondent Scott Horsley was in Wisconsin to cover the announcement, he stopped by Lake Effect to chat about Walker's presidential run.

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Ann-Elise Henzl

Supporters cheered on Gov. Scott Walker as he announced his presidential bid on Monday. At the same time, his detractors gathered outside the Waukesha County Expo Center to share their views.

Tom Mulvenna, a local leader of the American Federation of Teachers, summed up the crowd’s sentiments.

“So we are here today to warn America: Scott Walker has been wrong for Wisconsin, and he’d be even worse as president of the United States,” Mulvenna said.

"I love America." That's how Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker kicked off his presidential campaign in Waukesha Monday. He's the latest candidate to join the crowded Republican side, but he enters far from the bottom. He's topping nearly every poll in Iowa and made a strong showing at early gatherings.

And the big three of his announcement, in his words: Reform. Growth. Safety.

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