Great Lakes Compact

Wisconsin DNR

Wednesday, the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Water Resources Regional Body completed the last step necessary to push the City of Waukesha’s request to draw Lake Michigan water for a final vote.

Waukesha maintains the Great Lakes provide the only sustainable solution to its radium-tainted well water.

The group’s job was to review the application, judge if it adheres to the tenets of the Great Lakes Compact and pass recommendations to the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Council, or Compact Council.

S Bence

As Great Lakes delegates take another look today at Waukesha’s application to divert Lake Michigan water, they may consider an unsettled issue.

Two weeks ago, the so-called Regional Body held a marathon session in Chicago and seemed to agree that Waukesha should trim down its proposed service area closer to the city’s boundaries. During the discussions, one question arose intermittently.

S Bence

Two days of crucial discussions that could affect Waukesha and its drinking water ended Friday afternoon in Chicago. Representatives of the Great Lakes states and Canadian provinces scaled-back part of the city's plan to divert water from Lake Michigan. The changes are recommendations but could influence the final outcome in June. 

S Bence

The Conference of Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Governor and Premiers held the only scheduled public hearing as it scrutinizes Waukesha’s application on Thursday.

City leaders say that after years of fine-tuning their application, diversion is the only viable solution to replace Waukesha's current water source – deep wells that have become increasingly contaminated with radium.

S Bence

At 3 pm today, Wisconsin's neighboring seven state and two Canadian provinces will listen to what the public has to say about Waukesha's request to draw water from the Great Lakes Basin.

The visiting delegates face an immense decision, and the Great Lakes Compact is their guide.

It came to life in 2008 after years of discussion and negotiation. The agreement bans diversions from the Great Lakes Basin, save rare exceptions.

S Bence

Waukesha hopes to pump in 10 million gallons a day from Oak Creek’s utility, then treat and return the water to Lake Michigan via the Root River.

The city says it’s the best way to solve its existing underground source that it’s becoming more tainted with cancer-causing radium.

S Bence

Waukesha’s proposal to tap into Lake Michigan is inching forward after years of debate and revision.

The city is under federal order to secure clean water for residents because their underground source is increasing concentrated with radium, a health hazard.

The state DNR recently gave the nod to Waukesha’s application.

Waukesha's proposal to purchase Lake Michigan water is now open for public review. The City held the first of four public meetings Thursday.

As Waukesha holds its first public meeting on a revised request to purchase Lake Michigan water, an environmental expert shares concern that the Great Lakes Compact may contain holes in its protective armor.

The Waukesha Water Utility on Monday submitted its application to the DNR, to take and return Great Lakes water, starting by 2018.

Waukesha has been toiling over a tedious application to which a LOT of people are paying attention, including a coalition of conservationists.

Waukesha has made major revisions in its request for Lake Michigan water, so the Dept. of Natural Resources should conduct new hearings, according to several environmental interests.