health

As a neonatal intensive care nurse, Lauren Bloomstein had been taking care of other people's babies for years. Finally, at 33, she was expecting one of her own. The prospect of becoming a mother made her giddy, her husband, Larry, recalled recently— "the happiest and most alive I'd ever seen her."

Courtesy of MIAD

The Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design has a long history of connecting art students with industry. MIAD's signature program is the industrial design major, whose students have gone on to work for everyplace from GE Healthcare to Johnson Controls and companies around the world.

Christine Carr is about to graduate with a degree in industrial design, and her senior thesis features two projects that have one key inspiration in common: Carr’s six-year-old daughter, Lilly who has autism and is nonverbal.

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Early childhood experiences have a profound impact on the way human beings develop. From core functions like talking and walking to more nuanced, emotional responses - what happens to us in our early years, quite literally changes our lives.

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Over the past several months, data has shown rising mortality rates among a surprising population - middle-age, largely rural white people.  But many who study public health say focusing solely on that data ignores the historic disparities in other areas, such as the extraordinarily high maternal mortality rate among African-American women.

Stuart Seeger / Flickr

It used to be that coaches and trainers didn’t pay much attention when an athlete took a blow to the head during practice or competition. But that attitude has changed drastically over the last couple decades.

"I think we've gone a complete 180," says Lindsay Nelson, an assistant professor of neurosurgery and neurology at the Medical College of Wisconsin. 

Federal health officials may be about to get greatly enhanced powers to quarantine people, as part of an ongoing effort to stop outbreaks of dangerous contagious diseases.

The new powers are outlined in a set of regulations the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published late last month to update the agency's quarantine authority for the first time since the 1940s.

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A visit to the doctor’s office can sometimes be an uncomfortable experience - both physically and psychologically. 

Leaders at a medical center in Beaver Dam are leading communities in Dodge County in a multi-year effort to be happier and healthier. 

It's the first Wisconsin site for an international initiative called the Blue Zones Project. The project aims to help communities make healthier choices by making them more accessible.

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When the 21st Century Cures Act was signed by President Obama earlier this week, many praised the bill as a tribute to bipartisanship. The act passed with overwhelming support in the Senate, and was dedicated to Joe Biden’s son, Beau, who died last year from brain cancer.

Although the act earmarks funds for the Beau Biden Cancer Moonshot and BRAIN initiatives, the act is more than 1,000 pages long and includes provisions for a myriad of healthcare issues.

Bacteria are way smarter than we give them credit for.

No, I'm not talking about "brain smarts." Bacteria don't have neurons.

I'm referring to "chemical smarts": the ability to make, break down or gobble up whatever compound they want. Even if they've never been exposed to it before.

Scientists have found a superbug — hidden 1,000 feet underground in a cave — which is resistant to 70 percent of antibiotics and can totally inactivate many of them.

meaganschultz.com

The death of a loved one is one of the hardest things for people to go through.  For expecting parents, the loss of an unborn child through miscarriage brings with it the pain of loss – and also dozens of other tough emotions.

A Milwaukee woman is working not to make the loss easier, per se, but to help women work through their grief.

aidswalkwis / Facebook

A lot has changed in the last 27 years since the first AIDS Walk Wisconsin. The AIDS epidemic was still relatively new, and people around the country were being ravaged by the disease. Since then, more effective treatments have made HIV/AIDS much more manageable.

We all hold our fair share of stress – work, family matters, keeping a social calendar.

For high school students, that list also includes homework, thinking about college and a host of other “teenage” worries.

One all-girls high school in Milwaukee is trying to give its students the tools to manage stress – and take responsibility for their own well-being.

This isn’t your average gym class. In fact, it’s not gym class at all.

In the 1960s, the sugar industry funded research that downplayed the risks of sugar and highlighted the hazards of fat, according to a newly published article in JAMA Internal Medicine.

The Food and Drug Administration is recommending that blood banks screen all blood donations in the U.S. for the Zika virus.

It's a major expansion from a Feb. 16 advisory that limited such screening to areas with active Zika virus transmission.

In a statement released Friday, the FDA says all those areas are currently in compliance with blood screening, but that expanded testing is now needed.

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