health

Sixteenth Street Community Health Centers

In cities like Milwaukee, there are barriers to healthy living for many residents in neighborhoods with challenging economic conditions, such as the near south side. Organizations such as the Sixteenth Street Community Health Center exist to help area residents navigate those barriers.

Tatiana Maida is the Sixteenth Street Healthy Choices Department Manager. She says key obstacles to healthy living are the lack of healthy foods and safe outside spaces where people can freely exercise and engage with their community.

Chris Kleponis / Getty

Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin is suing the Trump administration over rules for Title X funding. The organization's branches in Utah and Ohio have joined the lawsuit. Title X gives grants to clinics to provide reproductive care for uninsured and under-insured people. Planned Parenthood says the Trump administration's new rules are illegal and will favor clinics that focus on abstinence education.

ipopba / Fotolia

Many businesses and organizations hold courses on administering cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, or CPR, and how to use an automated external defibrillator, or AED, device. The goal of this training is to have as many people as possible ready to assist in the case of a heart emergency.

And that’s music to the ears of Dr. Ivor Benjamin.

Benjamin is the director of the Cardiovascular Center at the Medical College of Wisconsin. And in July, he will assume the role of president of the American Heart Association.

When journalist Maya Dusenbery was in her 20s, she started experiencing progressive pain in her joints, which she learned was caused by rheumatoid arthritis.

As she began to research her own condition, Dusenbery realized how lucky she was to have been diagnosed relatively easily. Other women with similar symptoms, she says, "experienced very long diagnostic delays and felt ... that their symptoms were not taken seriously."

Marti Mikkelson

Community leaders called for an “all hands on deck” approach Tuesday to an outbreak of HIV and syphilis in Milwaukee. The Milwaukee Health Department says more than 120 people, including some high school students, have been affected. 

Nearly two dozen community leaders packed into a room at Milwaukee City Hall to offer solutions.

Eventually it happens to everyone. As we age, even if we're healthy, the heart becomes less flexible, more stiff and just isn't as efficient in processing oxygen as it used to be. In most people the first signs show up in the 50s or early 60s. And among people who don't exercise, the underlying changes can start even sooner.

dekdoyjaidee / Fotolia

WUWM has previously reported on the issue of doctor shortages, especially in already underserved areas.  Many efforts are underway to attract new doctors to practice in these places - efforts like UW’s TRIUMPH program.

READ: UW-Madison Program Places Med Students in Milwaukee's Underserved Communities

Mike Licht / Flickr

There are more than two decades worth of local restaurant inspection reports on the City of Milwaukee’s Health Department website. So if you want to know how your favorite eatery stacks up, you can look them up, see how they’ve done with health inspections in the past, and see the kinds of violations, if any, they’ve received. But the reports can be confusing and are full of jargon that’s generally unfamiliar to those of us who aren’t health inspectors.

Katie Watson

Professor Katie Watson is a classic polymath - a case of “How many hats can one person wear well?”  She’s a lawyer - having clerked in the federal judiciary and practiced public interest law; she’s an ethicist who has completed fellowships in clinical medical ethics and medical humanities; and… she’s also an adjunct faculty member at Chicago’s Second City theater’s comedy training center.

We live in an age of heightened awareness about concussions. From battlefields around the world to football fields in the U.S., we've heard about the dangers caused when the brain rattles around inside the skull and the possible link between concussions and the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

Aurora Health Care / facebook.com

The University of Wisconsin Medical School’s Training in Urban Medicine and Public Health, or TRIUMPH, program was founded nine years ago in an effort to better prepare students for the realities of practicing medicine in urban communities.  While the medical school is part of the university’s Madison campus, the TRIUMPH program is based in Milwaukee and partners with a number of organizations and provi

Aja C. Holmes planned to go to work last week, but her flu symptoms — a cough, fever and severe body aches that worsened overnight — had other ideas.

"It felt like somebody took a bat and beat my body up and down," said Holmes, 39, who works as a residential life director at California State University, Sacramento. "I couldn't get out of bed."

The nation is having a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad flu season.

Skye D. / Flickr

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death for women in the United States. But your odds of dying from the disease vary greatly based on your race and ethnicity. African-American women in the United States are more likely to have aggressive forms of breast cancer - and less likely to catch the disease in an early stage.

Alex Groth

Doctor video visits aren't new, but they are a growing form of treatment across the U.S. Aurora Health Care began treating patients via video six months ago.

Here's how it works: Patients log on to Aurora's platform and select an on-call provider. The doctor reviews a patient's health records before accepting the video call.

Peabody Awards / Wikimedia

You might know Jane Lynch from her work on Glee as the antagonistic gym teacher, Sue Sylvester. Or maybe you know her from one of Christopher Guest’s mockumentary films like Best in Show or A Mighty Wind. Or maybe you've seen her in The Forty-Year-Old VirginTwo and a Half Men, Arrested Development, Weeds... The list could go on and on. 

Pages