health

BUHANOVSKIY/FOTOLIA.COM

The bird flu is wreaking damage in the Midwest, particularly at poultry farms. 

For example, in Iowa, the avian flu has claimed more than five million chickens.

Here in Wisconsin, Gov. Scott Walker has declared a state of emergency. According to the state's agriculture department, poultry farmers have had to destroy more than 300,000 birds.

Raechelle Cline wants to make one thing clear: the avian flu has no impact on public health.

A farm in Iowa is going to destroy more than five million of its chickens in an attempt to curb the spread of the highly infectious avian flu.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed the H5N2 avian influenza outbreak Monday, adding that the agency says that there is little chance that humans could become infected. According to the department's press release:

Looks like many of us don't have the right stomach for a paleodiet. Literally.

Two studies give us a glimpse into our ancestors' microbiome — you know, those trillions of bacteria that live in the human gut.

And the take-home message of the studies is clear: Western diets and modern-day hygiene have wiped a few dozen species right out of our digestive tracts. One missing microbe helps metabolize carbohydrates. Other bygone bacteria act as prebiotics. And another communicates with our immune system.

It's another busy morning at Dr. Anthony Aurigemma's homeopathy practice in Bethesda, Md.

Wendy Resnick, 58, is here because she's suffering from a nasty bout of laryngitis. "I don't feel great," she says. "I don't feel myself."

Resnick, who lives in Millersville, Md., has been seeing Aurigemma for years for a variety of health problems, including ankle and knee injuries and back problems. "I don't know what I would do without him," she says. "The traditional treatments just weren't helping me at all."

Erin Toner

It used to be that if you wanted to see a doctor for your annual checkup or the flu, your options were Monday through Friday, during the day. But things are changing.

Many providers now offer extended hours to make seeing a doctor more convenient, and discourage visits to emergency centers.

Dr. Mushir Hassan is working through a busy morning of appointments, popping in and out of patient rooms, and pulling up charts on the laptop he totes. All pretty routine, except it’s a Saturday, a day doctors normally have off and many healthcare clinics are closed.

Photo by Brian Bahr/Getty Images

Athletes and sports fans are buzzing about Chris Borland’s decision to leave the NFL.

The former Wisconsin Badger is retiring from the San Francisco 49ers after a stand-out rookie season.

The reason: Borland says he’s worried about head trauma. He says he’s researched the potential long-term impact of head injuries and the chance of developing a degenerative brain condition. He told ESPN the risk isn’t worth it.

missty, Fotolia.com

Caregiving for a loved one who is chronically or terminally ill is an important job. And for people who can’t afford, or otherwise aren’t using paid nursing care, it’s also a huge and daunting task. 

Rostislav Sedlacek - Fotolia.com

Obesity is what many people tackle first when it comes to the effort to lead a more healthy life. 

ktsdesign - Fotolia.com

While we can all agree that the prospect of a heart attack is serious, there is evidence that one group of people doesn’t take their own risk for heart attacks seriously.  And it’s a pretty big group.

My Home, Your Home, Inc.

Authorities in Arizona last week announced they’d made dozens of arrests for human trafficking crimes in the events surrounding the Super Bowl. But young women are vulnerable in every city in the country, including Milwaukee.

UNMEER / Flickr

There was good news and bad news in the global fight against Ebola yesterday. 

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

On the surface, the news about Wisconsin and cardiac arrest seems good. If you go into cardiac arrest in the Milwaukee area, your chances for survival are greater than they are in most other parts of the country. 

michaelyork.net

Actor Michael York is known for heralded roles in films as diverse as Cabaret, Logan’s Run, and the Austin Powers movies.  But today, the actor hopes to stand in a spotlight of a different kind.

York suffers from a condition called amyloidosis, a rare disease that occurs when an abnormal protein called amyloid builds up in your organs. If left undiagnosed and untreated, it can be life threatening. Unfortunately there is not yet a cure for the disease, but there are treatments available that can help manage symptoms.

The RENEWAL Project seeks to raise awareness and research dollars for the condition. It is based at the Medical College of Wisconsin, where Doctor Parameswaran Hari is a leading researcher into the disease.

York was in Milwaukee this morning to launch the RENEWAL project, and he recently joined Lake Effect's Bonnie North in the studio along with RENEWAL Project coordinator Paul McComas over the phone.

"It's primed at a time when significant things are happening all over the world. It's so rare, it's 150,000 people in the United States and Europe combined," says York. "So I consider myself incredibly lucky to have had - finally - the correct diagnosis."

The Dept. of Health and Human Services has declared 35 U. S. hospitals prepared to treat Ebola victims, including two medical centers in Milwaukee.

Eric Baillies / nikijohnson.com

It is World AIDS Day, and the devastation the disease has caused around the globe is sobering and grim. But there is cause for quite a lot of hope as education and new advancements in medicine help those infected live healthier lives.

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