immigration

Updated at 4:25 p.m. ET

The Senate failed to pass any immigration legislation before a self-imposed Friday deadline, leaving lawmakers with no plan to address the roughly 700,000 immigrants who stand to lose legal protections as early as March 5.

The defeat follows a rocky 24 hours of negotiations on a bipartisan bill that failed following a veto threat from President Trump. By a 39-60 vote, senators rejected a White House-backed plan that became a partisan lightning rod after Trump insisted his plan was the only one he would sign.

Claudia Delgadillo

The United States Senate is again debating competing immigration plans with less than a month remaining before the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program is set to expire. The Trump Administration has indicated it will require the president’s border wall and broader border security measures to be a part of the solution, even as a majority of Americans say they believe the so-called Dreamers here under DACA should receive legal immigration status.

Original artwork by Ian Anastas / Cooperative Performance

Immigration, and the stories of immigrants, are front and center in this country - from the debate over the future of DACA, to the proposed border wall, no-fly lists and travel bans.  It is a challenging time to be an immigrant in this country.

Maayan Silver

Earlier this week, President Trump asked Republicans in Congress to pass his plan to provide a path to citizenship for millions of immigrants, in exchange for billions of dollars in funding for border security and efforts to reduce legal immigration.

Bath Fitter

On Friday, around 200 immigrants will be sworn in as naturalized citizens in Milwaukee. Their new status as Americans comes as the country continues to debate the topic of immigration and who has the right to enter and stay in this country legally.

The ceremony also comes in the midst of an annual event that a Wisconsin organization has organized for almost three-quarters of a century: the weekend-long Holiday Folk Fair at the Wisconsin State Fair Park.

A federal judge in Maryland has blocked parts of President Trump's most recent attempt to impose broad limits on who can enter the U.S., granting a motion for a preliminary injunction that was filed by plaintiffs led by the International Refugee Assistance Project.

The plaintiffs "have established that they are likely to succeed on the merits," District Judge Theodore D. Chuang wrote in the Tuesday order dealing another setback to the Trump administration's attempt to ban travel to the U.S. by citizens of certain countries.

Joe Brusky

Hundreds of people packed into a hearing room at the State Capitol on Thursday for a debate about the rights of undocumented immigrants. Most of the speakers who attended were there to argue against a bill that would crack down on so-called “sanctuary cities” in Wisconsin. The Republican measure would prohibit local governments from enacting policies that prevent federal agents from enforcing immigration laws.

Guido Hendrikx

Europe and the United States are currently trying to figure out how to deal with what’s been called a refugee crisis that has dwarfed all others - people fleeing from North Africa and the Middle East into Europe, trying to end up in Northern Europe or even the United States.

President Trump on Sunday sent Congress a list of sweeping immigration changes he says "must be included as part of any legislation addressing the status of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients."

Trump wants the border wall he campaigned on to be built, a crackdown on illegal immigration and to switch the U.S. legal immigration system from one that prioritizes family connections to one based on merit.

The Supreme Court has taken two cases involving President Trump's controversial travel ban off its calendar, after the White House issued a revised and expanded ban. The justices ordered both sides to file new briefs over whether parts of the issue are now moot.

"The cases are removed from the oral argument calendar, pending further order of the Court," the justices wrote in an order issued Monday.

Parties in the two cases — Trump v. International Refugee Assistance Project and Trump v. Hawaii — have until next Thursday, Oct. 5, to file their briefs.

The Trump administration is updating its travel ban, just hours before it was set to expire. In a proclamation signed by President Trump on Sunday, the travel restrictions now include eight countries, a couple of which are not majority-Muslim, as had been the case with all the nations in the original ban.

trump
Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images

The Trump administration has announced an end to DACA, an Obama-era law that protects undocumented children brought to the U.S. as minors from deportation. And the decision could have a serious impact on a number of immigrant students in Wisconsin schools.

Updated at 3:57 p.m. ET

The Trump administration Tuesday formally announced it will end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program — also called DACA — putting an expiration date on the legal protections granted to roughly 800,000 people known as "DREAMers," who entered the country illegally as children.

President Trump issued a statement, saying, "I do not favor punishing children, most of whom are now adults, for the actions of their parents. But we must also recognize that we are nation of opportunity because we are a nation of laws."

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

The White House will announce its decision about DACA, an Obama-era immigration policy, on Tuesday, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said. President Trump had earlier said the announcement could come at some point over the weekend.

As a presidential candidate, Trump pledged to "immediately terminate" DACA, the program that former President Barack Obama began five years ago to protect immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

But once in the White House, Trump took a softer stance.

President Trump has pardoned controversial former Sheriff Joe Arpaio for a misdemeanor criminal contempt conviction.

A statement issued by the White House Friday night said, "Today, President Donald J. Trump granted a Presidential pardon to Joe Arpaio, former Sheriff of Maricopa County, Arizona."

Known as "America's Toughest Sheriff," Arpaio gained a reputation for his harsh — his critics would say cruel — treatment of immigrants in the country illegally.

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