Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

The White House will announce its decision about DACA, an Obama-era immigration policy, on Tuesday, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said. President Trump had earlier said the announcement could come at some point over the weekend.

As a presidential candidate, Trump pledged to "immediately terminate" DACA, the program that former President Barack Obama began five years ago to protect immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

But once in the White House, Trump took a softer stance.

President Trump has pardoned controversial former Sheriff Joe Arpaio for a misdemeanor criminal contempt conviction.

A statement issued by the White House Friday night said, "Today, President Donald J. Trump granted a Presidential pardon to Joe Arpaio, former Sheriff of Maricopa County, Arizona."

Known as "America's Toughest Sheriff," Arpaio gained a reputation for his harsh — his critics would say cruel — treatment of immigrants in the country illegally.

Jesus Salas has been involved in nearly every aspect of the agriculture and migrant worker movement in Wisconsin - from founding Obreros Unidos to being CEO of United Migrant Opportunity Services.

As a child, Salas and his family traveled from Crystal City, Texas to the Great Lakes Region to cultivate and harvest crops. In 1959, the family settled in Wautoma, where the young Salas (a third-generation migrant worker) became actively involved in fighting for the rights of improving migrant workers.

Rachel Morello

Fernanda Jimenez is sixteen. She has a bubbly personality and braids in her hair. She's also an undocumented immigrant -- but that's not how she describes herself. 

"People who have DACA call themselves 'DACA-mented!'" Jimenez exclaims. 

Updated at 3:30 p.m. ET

President Trump unveiled controversial legislation on Wednesday that would sharply curtail legal immigration to the United States.

The president met at the White House with two Republican senators pushing the legislation, Tom Cotton of Arkansas and David Perdue of Georgia.

The Supreme Court says it will decide the fate of President Trump's revised travel ban, agreeing to hear arguments over immigration cases that were filed in federal courts in Hawaii and Maryland and allowing parts of the ban that has been on hold since March to take effect.

The justices removed the two lower courts' injunctions against the ban "with respect to foreign nationals who lack any bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States," narrowing the scope of those injunctions that had put the ban in limbo.

Updated at 6:20 p.m. ET

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that a preliminary injunction blocking President Trump's travel ban should remain in effect, at least for now. It's the second appeals court decision in less than a month to maintain a nationwide stay on the ban.

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

President Trump's administration filed a petition with the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday night seeking to reverse rulings by lower courts in Hawaii and Maryland that blocked a temporary ban on travel to the United States from six majority-Muslim countries.

The Trump administration says the Constitution gives the president "broad authority to prevent aliens abroad from entering this country when he deems it in the nation's interest."

David Haynes, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

WUWM and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel hosted Across the Divide: New Realities for Immigrants, an event at Carroll University in Waukesha. On Monday, May 22, panelists shared their thoughts and experiences with community members about an issue that is as complicated as ever.

Meet the panelists:

Michelle Maternowski

Thousands of people taking part in an annual May Day rally in Milwaukee focused their attention Monday on Sheriff David Clarke. Several inmates have died while in his care at the Milwaukee County Jail. An inquest jury recommended late Monday that the district attorney file criminal charges against seven jail staffers. The sheriff was not targeted, but the deaths are not the only reason marchers are upset with Clarke.

Updated 11:45 p.m. ET

A federal judge ruled Tuesday that the Trump administration cannot withhold federal funds from jurisdictions that limit their cooperation with immigration authorities, commonly known as sanctuary cities.

Joy Powers

Refugees from a myriad of countries have been resettling in Wisconsin for decades. Some come from war-torn countries like Syria or the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Others are fleeing religious or ethnic persecution, like the Rohingya Muslims of Myanmar. Most have had their educations disrupted in their home countries or during their time in a refugee camps.

Read a version of this story in Spanish.

As the White House pushes Congress to fund President Trump's U.S.-Mexico border wall, a new wrinkle has emerged that could stymie parts of the massive project.

Marti Mikkelson

Since President Trump’s crackdown on unauthorized immigrants, we’ve been hearing more about sanctuary cities, counties and even school districts. Those are entities that limit their cooperation with federal immigration agents. Now, another location labels itself as a safe haven: Amilinda, a restaurant in downtown Milwaukee that specializes in Spanish and Portuguese food.

Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images

The U.S. Justice Dept. sent letters on Friday to nine jurisdictions, giving them until June 30 to prove they are cooperating with federal authorities in enforcing immigration law - or risk losing a big pot of federal funding. That grant money has been earmarked for law enforcement.

Other communities that received the letter include Chicago, New York and New Orleans.