immigration

The Department of Justice has filed a brief with the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, responding to a legal challenge to President Trump's executive order on immigration.

The court is set to hear oral arguments by phone on Tuesday at 6 p.m. ET, in the next critical legal test of whether the president's decision to ban travel by people from seven Muslim-majority countries and halt refugee resettlement in the U.S. will be upheld.

Updated at 4:13 a.m. ET Sunday

President Trump's travel ban remains suspended, after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit denied a Justice Department request to stay the suspension of President Trump's order.

The court asked opponents of the ban to respond to the Trump administration's appeal by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. PT; the court asked the Justice Department to respond by Monday at 3 p.m. PT.

Marti Mikkelson

The Milwaukee County Board held a contentious debate Thursday over refugees and undocumented immigrants. When it ended, the board voted 12-6 to affirm its commitment to protecting immigrants who live here. 

The issue arose in response to President Trump’s order to temporarily bar people from seven mostly Muslim countries and his talk of deporting at least some undocumented immigrants.

GABRIELLA DEMCZUK FOR NPR

Last week, President Trump signed an executive order suspending new-refugee admissions for 120 days and blocking travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries — Iraq, Iran, Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Libya and Somalia — for 90 days. Syrian refugees are banned indefinitely.

Micaela Martin

More members of the Milwaukee community are hoping to send a message to President Donald Trump. It is that America and Milwaukee will not stand for discrimination. Late last week, Trump signed an executive order, temporarily banning immigrants and refugees from seven countries where Islam is the main religion. A mix of local lawmakers, immigrants and advocacy groups joined together Monday to voice their position.

State Rep. JoCasta Zamarripa stood at a podium in a room filled with concerned people on Milwaukee’s south side, with this to say…

Updated at 10:30 p.m. ET

President Trump has fired Acting Attorney General Sally Yates, concluding she has "betrayed the Department of Justice" by refusing to defend his executive order that imposes a temporary ban on refugees and visa holders from seven majority-Muslim countries.

In a statement, the White House called Yates, an Obama administration holdover with 27 years of experience prosecuting corrupt public officials and the man who bombed the Atlanta Olympic park, "weak on borders and very weak on illegal immigration."

A young man did not arrive this week, as expected, at Lutheran Social Services of Wisconsin and Upper Michigan because of President Trump’s temporary immigration freeze on seven nations.

"This morning (Monday), we were supposed to greet a young, single man. A 24-year-old man from Sudan, who was actually on an expedited case because of the fact that he was a victim of cruelty and torture. So he was turned back,” says spokesperson Kristi Strode.

Strode says other plans may also change at the agency, in coming days.

Former President Barack Obama has criticized President Trump's immigration and travel ban issued on Friday, saying through a spokesman that he is "heartened by the level of engagement" over the weekend in opposition to the action.

Marge Pitrof

Some religious leaders in Milwaukee are condemning President Trump’s 90-day ban on immigrants from seven Muslim-majority nations.

The faith leaders expressed their concerns Sunday at an interfaith gathering the local Ahamdiyya Muslim Community coordinated at Humboldt Park.

While the event was planned long before Trump signed his executive order on Friday, the ban - and the massive protests it has sparked - were on many minds.

President Trump's executive order on immigration late Friday ignited nationwide protests — and a slew of legal challenges.

At least four federal judges across the country have blocked part of the order and temporarily ensured refugees and travelers who reached U.S. soil would not be deported.

Here's an explanation of what happened so far and what could come next.

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

By the time the sun rose on Sunday in the U.S., the chaotic weekend set in motion by Trump's executive order on immigration was beginning to give way to greater clarity — in some respects, at least.

Thousands of protesters gathered at airports across the country Saturday to denounce President Trump's recent executive order that barred citizens of seven mostly Muslim countries: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen, from entering the U.S. for 90 days. The order also temporarily suspended entry to all refugees for 120 days.

Image from Facebook

While hundreds of people gathered at airports across the U.S. to protest President Trump's three-month ban on immigrants from a half-dozen Muslim-majority nations, scores of demonstrators held signs and rallied in Milwaukee on Saturday, outside the federal building on East Wisconsin Avenue.

Even as President Trump takes steps to restrict visitors from some majority-Muslim countries, he and his family continue to do business in some of the others.

Ethics experts question whether that might indicate conflicts between Trump's business interests and his role as U.S. president.

The executive action, "Protecting The Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into The United States," targets seven nations: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. Trump has no business interests in those countries.

Updated 2 p.m. ET

President Trump's freeze on immigration from seven mostly Muslim countries cites the potential threat of terrorism. But here's the twist — it doesn't include any countries from which radicalized Muslims have actually killed Americans in the U.S. since Sept. 11, 2001.

The president's executive action, which he signed Friday at the Pentagon, applies to these countries: Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Yemen, Iraq and Sudan.

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