immigration

Marti Mikkelson

Across Wisconsin, law enforcement agencies have been deciding whether or not to help enforce federal immigration rules.

For instance in Milwaukee, Police Chief Edward Flynn has said he’s not interested, but county Sheriff David Clarke is. He recently asked to participate in the federal 287(g) program, which would train deputies how to identify and detain immigrants who may be in the country illegally.

Joy Powers

The world is facing its worst refugee crisis in recorded history. Millions of people have been displaced by conflicts in Syria, South Sudan and other countries.

Updated at 3:30 a.m. ET Thursday

Hours after a federal judge in Hawaii issued a nationwide temporary restraining order against President Trump's travel ban, U.S. District Court Judge Theodore D. Chuang, in Maryland, issued a nationwide preliminary injunction prohibiting the enforcement of the 90-day ban against travelers from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. Chuang's order denies the plaintiffs' request to block other parts of Trump's March 6 executive order, including the temporary ban on refugees.

President Trump wants to revive a program that deputizes local law enforcement to help federal immigration agents cast a wider net.

It's part of his vow to increase deportations of unauthorized immigrants.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke has signed a letter of intent to take part in the federal government's 287(g) Task Force/Jail Enforcement program. It trains local law enforcement and then gives it authority to enforce immigration violations.

According to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, it currently partners with 37 law enforcement agencies in 16 states.

Clarke released his announcement Wednesday afternoon via a web post.

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

President Trump has signed a new executive order that temporarily blocks visas from being issued to citizens of six majority-Muslim countries, revoking and replacing a controversial, now-suspended executive order known as the travel ban.

Marti Mikkelson

There are more fears now, among immigrants who are in the U. S. illegally that they could be arrested and deported.  The Mexican consulate in Milwaukee says it's served more than 10,000 people since opening last summer.  

And, it's found that many clients don't have basic documentation such as passports.  The consulate held workshops over the weekend, they stressed the urgency of obtaining key papers.

Marti Mikkelson

Members of Milwaukee’s immigrant communities gathered at City Hall on Wednesday to denounce the Trump administration’s updated deportation strategy. He has ordered federal authorities to enforce immigration laws more aggressively, including deporting people arrested for minor offenses.

One person standing with unauthorized immigrants is Elana Kahn of the Milwaukee Jewish Federation. She says her relatives could have easily been subjected to an immigration crackdown nearly 100 years ago.

Rachel Morello

Concern over new federal immigration policies has spread to local school districts. 

Updated 5:25 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is releasing more on its plans to crack down on illegal immigration, enforcing the executive orders President Trump issued in late January. Those orders called for increased border security and stricter enforcement of immigration laws.

The Department of Homeland Security issued the new rules on Tuesday, laid out in two documents signed by Secretary John Kelly.

Marti Mikkelson

As the Trump administration considers tightening the rules over which immigrants and refugees can be in the country, one local church is preparing itself to serve as a sanctuary, if needed. Members of the Casa de Restauracion church in New Berlin say they can transform the building on a moment’s notice.

Marti Mikkelson

The lines have been non-stop at the Milwaukee City Clerk’s office – of people applying for the new Municipal ID card. They cannot use it for voting, but can use it for such things as opening a bank account or accessing prescriptions, if they don’t have any other kind of government ID.

A Syrian refugee living in Dane County filed a lawsuit this month against President Trump's now-stalled travel ban. The U.S. granted the man asylum because soldiers in Syria had imprisoned and tortured him, but his wife and three-year-old daughter remained behind, in Aleppo. He had applied for his family to join him but said the Trump ban halted the procedure, so he sued.

Micaela Martin

What seemed like thousands upon thousands of people showed up at the Milwaukee County Courthouse on Monday. They rallied against immigration policies that President Donald Trump has tried to enact, and that Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke could opt to enforce. It was one of 11 such rallies held across the state.

David Sherman

Whether it's the travel ban or the temporary suspension of refugee admissions, immigration issues are at the forefront these days. As the United States and the world grapple with refugees from Africa and the Middle East, in the 1930s and '40s, the international community needed to respond to the increasing number of European Jews fleeing Nazi Germany.  

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