immigration

Marge Pitrof

Some religious leaders in Milwaukee are condemning President Trump’s 90-day ban on immigrants from seven Muslim-majority nations.

The faith leaders expressed their concerns Sunday at an interfaith gathering the local Ahamdiyya Muslim Community coordinated at Humboldt Park.

While the event was planned long before Trump signed his executive order on Friday, the ban - and the massive protests it has sparked - were on many minds.

President Trump's executive order on immigration late Friday ignited nationwide protests — and a slew of legal challenges.

At least four federal judges across the country have blocked part of the order and temporarily ensured refugees and travelers who reached U.S. soil would not be deported.

Here's an explanation of what happened so far and what could come next.

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

By the time the sun rose on Sunday in the U.S., the chaotic weekend set in motion by Trump's executive order on immigration was beginning to give way to greater clarity — in some respects, at least.

Thousands of protesters gathered at airports across the country Saturday to denounce President Trump's recent executive order that barred citizens of seven mostly Muslim countries: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen, from entering the U.S. for 90 days. The order also temporarily suspended entry to all refugees for 120 days.

Image from Facebook

While hundreds of people gathered at airports across the U.S. to protest President Trump's three-month ban on immigrants from a half-dozen Muslim-majority nations, scores of demonstrators held signs and rallied in Milwaukee on Saturday, outside the federal building on East Wisconsin Avenue.

Even as President Trump takes steps to restrict visitors from some majority-Muslim countries, he and his family continue to do business in some of the others.

Ethics experts question whether that might indicate conflicts between Trump's business interests and his role as U.S. president.

The executive action, "Protecting The Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into The United States," targets seven nations: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. Trump has no business interests in those countries.

Updated 2 p.m. ET

President Trump's freeze on immigration from seven mostly Muslim countries cites the potential threat of terrorism. But here's the twist — it doesn't include any countries from which radicalized Muslims have actually killed Americans in the U.S. since Sept. 11, 2001.

The president's executive action, which he signed Friday at the Pentagon, applies to these countries: Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Yemen, Iraq and Sudan.

Updated at 5:25 p.m. ET

President Trump said on Twitter Thursday morning that "if Mexico is unwilling to pay for the badly needed wall, then it would be better to cancel the upcoming meeting" with Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto.

Shortly afterward, news broke that Peña Nieto had done just that. He also took to Twitter and said he would not attend Tuesday's planned visit to Washington, D.C., without giving a reason.

Jordyn Noennig

On Wednesday, the day President Trump signed two executive orders cracking-down on illegal immigration, a Milwaukee County Board committee listened to what people here had to say about a related item here. A proposed resolution states the county’s commitment to protect all residents and keep families together despite their legal status. The committee deadlocked on the issue, meaning it will go to the full board, with no recommendation.

As the Trump administration is expected to overhaul America's immigration system, some policymakers suggest looking north to Canada.

That's because Canadians see immigration as critical to their economic success. The nation has invited in so many immigrants that today, one-fifth of the population is foreign-born.

Yet Canadians don't seem to wrestle with anti-immigrant nativism that has erupted in the U.S. and Europe.

Remittances, or cash that gets wired, is a big deal for a lot of countries around the world — including Mexico. Just in November alone, nearly $2.4 billion in cash was sent there, mostly by Mexicans and Mexican Americans working in the US. That's the most money Mexicans have sent back in a single month in the last 10 years. And it's more income than Mexico makes off oil.

Updated at 5:50 p.m. ET

President Trump has signed two executive orders related to immigration and border security, moving ahead with his plans to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico and to deport people who are in the country illegally.

Marge Pitrof

Demonstrators in Milwaukee pledged to fight any new policies emerging from a Trump White House that would weaken protections for undocumented immigrants, migrant dairy workers, students, members of the Muslim religion, LGBT community and refugees.

Late Saturday morning, the protesters marched from the near south side to the Milwaukee County Courthouse where speakers and music stirred the crowd. Dozens of people had driven in from Madison, Racine and other Wisconsin cities, to take part.

The results are in, but last month’s presidential election still leaves many questions unanswered, including what will happen with undocumented immigrants.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

It's not clear when or how President-election Donald Trump will implement some of his campaign pledges, including mass deportations of immigrants who are here illegally. Yet Wisconsin groups are taking steps to protect undocumented residents in the event Trump begins his promised round-up.

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