immigration

Updated at 5:50 p.m. ET

President Trump has signed two executive orders related to immigration and border security, moving ahead with his plans to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico and to deport people who are in the country illegally.

Marge Pitrof

Demonstrators in Milwaukee pledged to fight any new policies emerging from a Trump White House that would weaken protections for undocumented immigrants, migrant dairy workers, students, members of the Muslim religion, LGBT community and refugees.

Late Saturday morning, the protesters marched from the near south side to the Milwaukee County Courthouse where speakers and music stirred the crowd. Dozens of people had driven in from Madison, Racine and other Wisconsin cities, to take part.

The results are in, but last month’s presidential election still leaves many questions unanswered, including what will happen with undocumented immigrants.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

It's not clear when or how President-election Donald Trump will implement some of his campaign pledges, including mass deportations of immigrants who are here illegally. Yet Wisconsin groups are taking steps to protect undocumented residents in the event Trump begins his promised round-up.

The fate of one of President Obama's controversial executive actions on immigration goes before the Supreme Court on Monday. The action would grant temporary, quasi-legal status and work permits to as many as 4 million parents who entered the U.S. illegally prior to 2010. The president's order applies only to parents of children who are U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents.

LaToya Dennis

On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court begins considering a divisive issue related to immigration. The case originated in Texas, but the implications are potentially broad-reaching. Interests in Wisconsin are keeping close watch.

LaToya Dennis

On Wednesday, immigrant advocates carpooled to the state Capitol to voice opposition to several bills, including one that would penalize so-called sanctuary cities.

WUWM's LaToya Dennis met up with a group of about 20 immigrant advocates before they boarded a bus in Milwaukee to protest what they’re calling anti-immigrant legislation.

“We are all immigrants. We are not criminals like some people say," Guadalupe Gallardo says. She is originally from Mexico but has lived in the U.S. for more than 40 years. Gallardo says she got her citizenship in the late 1990s.

Win McNamee / Getty Images

Controversy continues to swirl around Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump’s call to ban Muslims from entering the United States in the wake of the violence in Paris and in Southern California.  

Some GOP leaders, such as House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, have condemned Trump’s idea. But Ryan and others have stopped short of saying the comments should disqualify Trump from holding the highest office in the country.

WisDoc / Flickr

All summer, Jewish Museum Milwaukee has hosted an exhibit that views the history of baseball through the lens of the immigrant experience.

Chasing Dreams: Baseball and Becoming American features not only the stories of pioneering Jewish baseball players, but those of other immigrant communities.

Jose

Millions of immigrants are living in the U.S. illegally. President Obama put forth a plan to allow five million of them to remain in the U.S. without fear of deportation. His plan is on hold because 26 states, including Wisconsin, have sued.

WUWM spoke with a man and his daughter about living in limbo.

It’s late in the day and Jose is sitting in his living room. He rents a duplex in Waukesha.

“Yeah, it’s a good life, you know,” Jose says.  

LaToya Dennis

In just a few weeks, President Obama will tell five million undocumented immigrants what they must do to avoid deportation.

The federal lawsuit Wisconsin and 16 other states have filed, accuse President Obama of exceeding his authority and violating the Constitution.

LaToya Dennis

Many undocumented people in Wisconsin may be wondering what steps to take now that President Obama has changed some rules on immigration.

Sen. Ron Johnson, Facebook

Last Thursday, President Obama outlined his plan for immigration reform in a televised address. 

LaToya Dennis

Pres. Obama will allow five million immigrants in the U.S. illegally, to as he put it, “come out of the shadows,” at least temporarily.

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